AAFTA and China Tariffs

dflett68

Active Member
#91
Gee....I will sure look at these groups differently now that I know they are political activists. They probably should have stayed in the sandbox they usually play in. I notice they don't protest the regimes that send all the tackle manufacturers overseas, but that would hurt their candidate.....
isn't the sandbox they play in manufacturing? do the gun manufacturers voice their positions on gun legislation?
 
True. I have noticed that I seem to be paying made in USA prices for made in china gear from the big brand names. Which is why I am largely changing to cheaper brand names. Clothing especially. It’s all made in the same factory over there. Why pay triple the price.
You pay more for brand name stuff made in China because they have different factories, different manufacturing methods, and different standards of quality. Oh yeah, and different levels of enforcement of those quality standards. It is not likely that a factory making, say, high end clothing, has cheapo Wal-Mart t-shirts made in the same factory. I'm speaking from personal experience:

I worked in China for four years at a factory making a popular consumer good. My company had Americans like me in all the factories producing our product, watching quality all day long, personally inspected manufacturing methods and adherence to same, as well as the results, before they left the factory doors. My company's goods were high-end, often costing twice what the competitors charged, but we made billions, and even though I've since left that company, they're still making billions, and a good percentage of those goods are made in China.

Made in China does not necessarily mean "piece of sh1t," as much as folks would like to think that. The Chinese people can manufacture high quality goods. You Get What You Pay For. I think this lesson has been described many times in earlier posts. Want the cheapest items? Yup, quality will suffer, and materials will be downgraded.
 
You pay more for brand name stuff made in China because they have different factories, different manufacturing methods, and different standards of quality. Oh yeah, and different levels of enforcement of those quality standards. It is not likely that a factory making, say, high end clothing, has cheapo Wal-Mart t-shirts made in the same factory. I'm speaking from personal experience:

I worked in China for four years at a factory making a popular consumer good. My company had Americans like me in all the factories producing our product, watching quality all day long, personally inspected manufacturing methods and adherence to same, as well as the results, before they left the factory doors. My company's goods were high-end, often costing twice what the competitors charged, but we made billions, and even though I've since left that company, they're still making billions, and a good percentage of those goods are made in China.

Made in China does not necessarily mean "piece of sh1t," as much as folks would like to think that. The Chinese people can manufacture high quality goods. You Get What You Pay For. I think this lesson has been described many times in earlier posts. Want the cheapest items? Yup, quality will suffer, and materials will be downgraded.
Agreed. I've been to China for work on multiple occasions, and it's astounding how different reality is from the general narrative around here.

As a consumer, I can agree that a lot of crap comes from China. But so do some of the nicest products available in a great many of segments.
 
Chick-fil-a is next.
Time for some chicken tariffs!
SF
Interesting trivia: My wife's sister's in-laws live in Guangzhou, China. They are in the chicken importing and exporting business. They import chicken wings and feet from the USA - despite Buffalo Wild Wings, there is overall very little demand for them here, but lots in China for both appendages. They export breasts, thighs, and drumsticks to the USA. Especially breast meat, Chinese are not fond of - they feel that meat that's closest to the bone is tastiest. Chickens for local consumption in China are scrawny things, compared to the plump things you pull out of a Purdue package.
 
Agreed. I've been to China for work on multiple occasions, and it's astounding how different reality is from the general narrative around here.

As a consumer, I can agree that a lot of crap comes from China. But so do some of the nicest products available in a great many of segments.
You know, my arguments are based on macroeconomics and retaining middle class sustainable wages for American workers, not on the perceived quality of Chinese goods nor on disparagement of the Chinese people.

Never been to China and don't want to go, as Montana is just a little too crowded for me these days. My daughter and SIL were stationed in Korea for 3 years though, and the differences there are amazing. Lots of construction from the bad old days. Spotless public transposition, pristine and safe city streets, well dressed and polite children. My daughter taught English as a Second Language in an immersion school. Their value of education is so different from ours; the school was already pricy, and for Holidays, Birthdays, Teacher's Day and sometimes just because of good progression in language skills my daughter would be given French perfume, Hermes scarves and food delicacies by grateful parents. She could carry all this loot home on the subway and never worry about being mugged. If it was Teacher's Day and you were seen with gifts it was just assumed, and everyone you made eye contact with would bow down. If you knew my daughter, or I suspect, most twenty-somethings she felt that was just her due as well :cool:.

Aging parents cared for by their families.

Oh, and I do know the dark side too; single folks drunk most nights, highly competitive from birth, high suicide rates, etc. Yin and Yang everywhere.

One of my hopes is that Trump and Pompeo can persuade Kim that NK could be at least the rival of SK economically rather than have starving masses.
 
Never been to China and don't want to go, as Montana is just a little too crowded for me these days.
There are parts of China, some of them very beautiful indeed, that are uncrowded. Many of those parts might remind you of the mountainous parts of Montana. I speak of the Yunnanese foothills of the Himalayas. I've hiked around there; it's breathtaking. I didn't go trout fishing, though. :(
 

Latest posts