DIY leaders?

#31
I use 30# on heavy rods - 8 & 10 weights.


How well do your swivels float? :D I might try a micro swivel on a sinking rig though. My point in using a tippet ring is: it's easier for old eyes in dim light to tie an improved clinch than a blood knot when replacing tippets, especially in dim light. And . . . I never have to replace the next step ahead of the tippet because it has become too short.

Whatever works for you. I'll keep my seat on the band wagon. :D.

tippet rings float? if you bother to read i said i onyl use swivels for subsurface... smh
 

Jim Ficklin

Genuine Montana Fossil
#32
Tippet rings can't break the surface tension of the water when fishing dries.

tippet rings float? if you bother to read i said i onyl use swivels for subsurface... smh
I did "bother to read" your entire post, including "sub-surface," hence my statement that I'll try them when fishing that way. I read BOTH posts, including your attempts to belittle fellow members who use either tippet rings or loops. Tippets rings work just fine for my desired purpose, just as swivels satisfy your needs. Fortunately, we don't all have to fish the same way.
 
#33
Tippet rings can't break the surface tension of the water when fishing dries.



I did "bother to read" your entire post, including "sub-surface," hence my statement that I'll try them when fishing that way. I read BOTH posts, including your attempts to belittle fellow members who use either tippet rings or loops. Tippets rings work just fine for my desired purpose, just as swivels satisfy your needs. Fortunately, we don't all have to fish the same way.
FOREWARING. the below are my opinions. im not putting down anyone who does things different. do what you want. im sharing for the people who might be open to trying things that are a little outside the "normal" when it comes to building and fishing custom leaders and rigs.

lol sorry you feel that way. i cant see an argument for using a tippet ring for dry fly work. just a good old blood know for me. but i suppose if the knot is hard to tie then ya gotta do what ya gotta do. still my personal opinion is that its an inferior rig to a blood knot tippet.

as far as the loops. i didnt belittle anyone.... i think its a less then ideal setup that has become the "norm" because of its ease of use and popularity amount fly line makers. but give it a try, 30lb clinch knoted to the welded fly line loop casts better, drags less, runs through guides better, and in my expereince from steelhead to lake fishing does not damage the fly line.
 
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#35
FOREWARING. the below are my opinions. im not putting down anyone who does things different. do what you want. im sharing for the people who might be open to trying things that are a little outside the "normal" when it comes to building and fishing custom leaders and rigs.

lol sorry you feel that way. i cant see an argument for using a tippet ring for dry fly work. just a good old blood know for me. but i suppose if the knot is hard to tie then ya gotta do what ya gotta do. still my personal opinion is that its an inferior rig to a blood knot tippet.

as far as the loops. i didnt belittle anyone.... i think its a less then ideal setup that has become the "norm" because of its ease of use and popularity amount fly line makers. but give it a try, 30lb clinch knoted to the welded fly line loop casts better, drags less, runs through guides better, and in my expereince from steelhead to lake fishing does not damage the fly line.

Lol love it. Call using loops dumb then claim you aren't belittling anyone. Passive aggressiveness at its finest. If you think they're dumb, that's fine with me. Your experience, however, differs greatly from mine. I've fished loops for years and have caught plenty of fish up to lingcod and albacore with zero issue. My leader does not enter my guides until I'm done for the day and reeling in so how smoothly it goes thru is simply not a concern, not that I've noticed loops to be much of a problem. I've never had any issue with loops damaging fly lines but have seen that with clinch knots.

I have zero issue casting a loop, and can't imagine why that would ever be an issue. Same with its drag in the water. But then of course presentation isn't a focus in my fishing.

To each their own. There is more than one way to skin a cat. The type of fishing one is doing could definitely play a part. If I'm fishing floating lines and 30' of leader on a lake I'd probably be more concerned with how a loop or knot went thru guides but since virtually all of my fishing is sinking lines with 6' or less of level leader it doesnt enter my radar.
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#36
thinking a method of line connections is "dumb" is not belittling anyone for using them. I simply think there is a better and more effective solution. ive fished loop to loop for years. super happy i accidently learned the method i use now. I have used both methods and base my opinion on the differences i have experienced.. have you? im tapping out, yall are taking this stuff way to serious and personal. lol
 
#37
Sounds like thus is right up my alley. What’s a tippet ring? Instead of blood knots, what are you using to connect each section? Could you give me an example of what size lines you might piece together to fish a 6wt with streamers and full sink line ?
for streamers either on sinking lines or weighted streamers, depending on the size of fish I just tie directly using 12 lb. or 8 lb. Seaguar fluorocarbon.

When I use tippet rings, I don't notice any hinge issues wet or dry. I have never had any issues with a tippet ring sinking on a dry fly leader even with size 18 flies. They are much easier/faster to use so they make it easier for me to have the fly in the water more.
 
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#38
I tied my own spey leaders last year starting with 50# down to 12#. I've found that blood knots are a pain to tie and I have less confidence in them with larger diameter lines... somewhere around 15lb ultragreen and up is where I really have troubles with blood knots and go with triple surgeons.

I've been fishing flies that have a 5/32 dumbell on them lately with my 8wt. I find that a tapered leader still seems to help things roll out (maybe I'm kidding myself?) I go 25# to 12# and then use 8# tippet for a total length of about 5'.
You use a triple surgeons for 50# test? I had a tough time a few years ago trying to tie any knots with anything above 25#.
 

the_grube

Active Member
#40
I think I double surgeon the 50# to 40# connection. It might only be a 50% knot but I'm pretty sure the tippett will break first. In fact I've verified that on several rocks and underwater foliage

What are others using for large diam mono splicing? Do I just need to dial in my blood knot chops or is there a better alternative.
 
#41
Back to the OP. This doesn't really answer your question on making leaders, but as a couple others have mentioned, if you are just fishing a fast sink line deep....

The only leader and tippet you need is 4-6' of straight mono/fluoro in your final tippet size. Say 6' of 10 lb fluoro for trout in lakes...done.
 
#42
there is an advantage to a triple surgeons over a double, and that is the natural direction of the knot when well dressed is in line with the leader. it will have a slight variation in direction with a double surgeons. I dont ever use that heavy of line so I cant speak to the value of either knot on the heavy mono.
 
#43
thinking a method of line connections is "dumb" is not belittling anyone for using them. I simply think there is a better and more effective solution. ive fished loop to loop for years. super happy i accidently learned the method i use now. I have used both methods and base my opinion on the differences i have experienced.. have you? im tapping out, yall are taking this stuff way to serious and personal. lol

No, I have no experience with it. I just like to babble about things I have no experience in :rolleyes:

I'm not taking anything seriously. This is the internet. And I'm glad you've used your experience to decide what works best for you. I've done the same and my experience is much different than yours. I already mentioned that different fishing may attribute to this difference in experience, but its different nonetheless.

Nothing wrong with your way of doing things. If it works for ya then that's all that matters. However that doesn't make it a superior method or the right way to do it... But the way you present your opinions as fact leaves you open to differing thoughts. And speaking of taking things too seriously, someone "tapping" out when disagreed with seems to be taking things quite seriously indeed lol. Lighten up my man... You're not the only one who has tried different methods and settled on what works best for you.
 

Irafly

Indi "Ira" Jones
#44
thinking a method of line connections is "dumb" is not belittling anyone for using them. I simply think there is a better and more effective solution. ive fished loop to loop for years. super happy i accidently learned the method i use now. I have used both methods and base my opinion on the differences i have experienced.. have you? im tapping out, yall are taking this stuff way to serious and personal. lol
I loop all the time. Oh, and you are a bit tone deaf sometimes.
 

Tinker

Reactive Member
#45
I fish deep, still water often and agree with the general consensus that you don't need multiple sections in a hand-tied leader, but... with heavy sinking line (I use sink tips not integrated lines) I find it's important for me to use a short, 9-10" section of 30# line as a butt section to control hinging at the leader-fly line connection. It allows the line to unroll better than a leader without a heavier but section unrolls. Maybe that's just the way I cast.

I don't use a tippet very often since I learned how to tie 4# and 6# line directly to the 30# butt section, so I've never used a tippet ring - but I have some on order for saltwater fishing from my kayak. I change flies often when ocean fishing and thought it might be better to use a short section of tippet so I'm able to change-out a tippet instead of needing to change leaders and hold onto my fly rod while bobbing around in the ocean in a little plastic boat.

In freshwater lakes, I may use a leader that's 8 feet long when fishing deep, but usually they're 5-6 feet long.

I guess I buck the trend of using fluorocarbon lines for anything. I was an early adopter until I noticed that my fluorocarbon lines cast shadows just as dark as any other line. If the line was "invisible" (Seaguar disagrees with those claims, BTW), the shadow it casts is most definitely visible.

Someone said that fluorocarbon lines are UV resistant, therefore, since fish can see UV light, flurocarbon may be visible to us but not to fish. I think that's hogwash, because UV resistant means it will reflect UV light rather than absorbing it, thus, if it's true that fish can detect light in the UV spectrum and fluorocarbon reflects UV light... well, it's not rocket surgery. Why would I pay more for a line that doesn't cinch down and hold knots as well as cheaper nylon lines, weakens by at least 50% of it's rated break strength when it's stretched, and doesn't seem to be all that invisible?