bridge cameras?

rawalker

Active Member
Hi All,
Anyone have any experience with the "bridge cameras"? I'm thinking of one for taking pictures of birds that just never seem to be close enough for my little point and shoot camera.
Thanks,
Richard
 

tkww

Member
The Nikons are very popular, though Canon, Panasonic, and Sony also make good compacts.

Be aware that these cameras have some limitations. They're not going to excel in lower light due to a couple of factors. However solving that problem is a very expensive proposition (i.e., DSLR/MILC plus a lens), so they are what they are. Just don't expect miracles as the light fades. 2nd, because they can offer extreme magnifcation, they also need stabilization. Yes there is some built in, but it will only get you so far. So if you plan on pushing the zooming, you should plan on a tripod/monopod/window mount.

All that said, they are the only way to "inexpensively" get into the telephoto game, which is why they are popular with birders.
 
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Gyrfalcon2015

Wild Trout
Adding a very light tripod and an equally small fluid ballhead on even a point and shoot will increase the number of quality results.

A light monopod on a telephoto works wonders as well.
 

rawalker

Active Member
Thanks for the tripod/monopod advice. Going to give it a shot with my point and shoot before forking out the $ for one of those cameras.
richard
 

Nick Clayton

Well-Known Member
WFF Supporter
FWIW I picked up a Nikon P900 fairly recently.

My main camera setup is a Sony a6300 and I have a good selection of lenses but decided on the Nikon as a fairly inexpensive alternative to a crazy spendy telephoto lense. I haven't used it a ton but I've been quite happy with it. Not a great option in low light, but that's not what I bought it for. Pics tend to get fairly soft when zoomed way out, but at zoom levels that I can manage without a tripod they look plenty good for my needs. A tripod or some sort of support is definitely needed at the furthest zoom ranges but I use this mostly from my boat so that's not really an option.

The auto focus is ok but nothing to write home about, and overall it seems a bit slow in general but not major complaints considering I bought it specifically for the occasional long range use.

For my needs it works quite well and its a lot of fun to play with. The zoom is super fun to play with at max range, if not overly practical for normal use.
Wouldn't be a replacement for my main camera but does well with normal day to day stuff in a pinch and considering the money I'd need to shell out for a decent telephoto lense I'm quite happy with it as an alternative.


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rawalker

Active Member
tkww,
thanks for the link. I will look them over. sounds like a good way to get a feel for what is possible.
richard
 

Kyle Smith

Active Member
You can get fairly recent Olympus Pen cameras for like $100. The PM2 and PL5 both have 16mp sensors and touchscreen autofocus. The Olympus 40-150 lens can be found under $100, as can a normal zoom like the Panasonic 12-32.

The PL5 is very small, and since I paid so little I won't cry too hard when I fall in the water with it. I personally like Panasonic bodies better, but they usually cost more. So my GX85 lives in a dry bag half the time, with my favorite fish close-up lens attached.

The nice thing with mirrorless interchangeable lens cameras is that you can add lenses in the future, such as a fast fixed lens or two for low light shooting. Like fishing, photography is a serious source of GAS.
 

Ron McNeal

"Sheltering"........ & BORED....
Adding a very light tripod and an equally small fluid ballhead on even a point and shoot will increase the number of quality results.

A light monopod on a telephoto works wonders as well.
Having admired your many photo posts, I think, if I were looking for camera advise, I’d place extra value on your comments.
 

Jim Ficklin

Genuine Montana Fossil
I picked-up 2 bridge cameras - a Sony RX10 IV & a Nikon P1000. Both take good pictures, but the Sony has the edge all the way around & I use it the most. The Nikon with its huge zoom capability has its uses for long-range still shots, however.
 

tkww

Member
I picked-up 2 bridge cameras - a Sony RX10 IV & a Nikon P1000. Both take good pictures, but the Sony has the edge all the way around & I use it the most.
The 1" sensors that the sonys use really do make a difference, and sony has done a good job of putting quality glass in front of them. I just wish that series wasn't so darn expensive.
 

Jim Ficklin

Genuine Montana Fossil
The 1" sensors that the sonys use really do make a difference, and sony has done a good job of putting quality glass in front of them. I just wish that series wasn't so darn expensive.
Indeed . . . they are spendy, but both cameras suited my needs. I played the "camera body & multiple lenses" game before and neither need-to nor want-to go there again. Sony did a great job, Nikon has some shortcomings but I'll overlook those when I use the massive zoom capacity.

Heck, at almost 72, I'm pretty sure I'll only be here one time, so what the hell . . . it's only money & and it ain't coming with me when I check-out . . .
 
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JamesRPL+

Active Member
If the situation calls for a tripod, don't go cheap or lite weight.tripods are to steady the camera not just hold it.

Mono pods are ok like a hiking stick, easy to carry but if your using longer exposures get a good tripod

Nice thing about the newer Sony's is they got rid of the mirror,lighter, quieter and just a better system.
 

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