Reg pamphlet hits the street

Shad

Active Member
#16
Maybe a dumb question, but why can't the regs at least coincide with the general season and be out before it starts?
One aspect of science WDFW clearly leads the way on is the science of selling the sizzle before the customer sees the steak.

By far, more citizens participate in lowland lake fisheries than in any other type. Those fisheries are where WDFW makes their hay on license revenues. That makes April (at the end of which the lake season opens) the ideal month to start selling new licenses.

A nice "side benefit" this schedule affords WDFW is that it requires most salmon and steelhead anglers to buy their new license before they know what kind of opportunities they will get to fish for those species (as was mentioned, those seasons don't get set until after North of Falcon). That's good business for the department, because they might have sold a lot fewer licenses and "salmon and steelhead endorsements" in the past couple years had the seasons been set prior to licenses going on sale.

Basically, this strategy maximizes their potential to exploit a shrinking revenue base.
 

FinLuver

Active Member
#17
One aspect of science WDFW clearly leads the way on is the science of selling the sizzle before the customer sees the steak.

By far, more citizens participate in lowland lake fisheries than in any other type. Those fisheries are where WDFW makes their hay on license revenues. That makes April (at the end of which the lake season opens) the ideal month to start selling new licenses.

A nice "side benefit" this schedule affords WDFW is that it requires most salmon and steelhead anglers to buy their new license before they know what kind of opportunities they will get to fish for those species (as was mentioned, those seasons don't get set until after North of Falcon). That's good business for the department, because they might have sold a lot fewer licenses and "salmon and steelhead endorsements" in the past couple years had the seasons been set prior to licenses going on sale.

Basically, this strategy maximizes their potential to exploit a shrinking revenue base.
Are WA licenses good for the calendar year JAN thru DEC or during the New Reg's duration?
If it's the later, I would wait till the New Regs came out to decide on my purchase...they might get the hint with less revenue/sales.
 

Snopro

Active Member
#18
It's three different dates. Jan 1 is the start of the calendar year, April 1st is the start of your license year, and July 1st is the regulatory year.
 

Shad

Active Member
#22
Are WA licenses good for the calendar year JAN thru DEC or during the New Reg's duration?
If it's the later, I would wait till the New Regs came out to decide on my purchase...they might get the hint with less revenue/sales.
The license year is April-March, no matter when you buy it. If you buy an annual license to fish the last week of March, you'll have to renew it April 1 to keep fishing.

The point of my post was that the current timing of license renewals and regulation publication is either ridiculously fortuitous or entirely by design. I suspect the latter, and if I'm right, they're not likely to change that because we say so. Their revenue stream depends on selling as many licenses as possible, and this accomplishes that goal.

To be clear, salmon and steelhead anglers DO have a choice to wait on buying their license until after seasons are set. Trouble is (and WDFW knows and leverages this very effectively), most of us also like to fish for trout and other stuff, too, and if we want to do that during the prime spring months, we have to buy in early.

* I should add that spring fishing is some of my favorite, so I'm mostly okay with the way it works now. The thing that bugs me most is when fisheries that were open the previous year get closed, just a few months after I bought my new license. Grrrr....
 
#25
The April 1st to March 31st license period was established quite a few years ago to accommodate the winter steel head fishers. That was done at the request of said fishers to coincide with the general steel head season.

There is nothing underhanded about the action as some here seem to infer.

I can relate to the frustration of the closures. We are paying for years of habitat abuse and to place all the blame on WDFW is short sighted. Like SG I have issues with some management practices and would like to see a shift in focus. I have issues with how the ESA listings and implication of "preservation of wile stocks are being handled. That too is not all the fault of WDF ad their hands are tied in some ways by federal mandates.

The bottom line is there are no simple solutions and we have to learn to put up with what we have and work to influence changes.

Dave
 

Salmo_g

Well-Known Member
#27
Wetline Dave has it closest. The timing of the fishing license year goes back to the 1970s following the US v WA court decision and long before the old WDG (and briefly the WDW) and WDF merged to form the present day WDFW. The license and punch card years used to follow the calendar year. The problem is that the winter steelhead season (mostly Dec. - Mar.) spans two calendar years. So we had one year where our fishing licenses actually lasted 15 months, to the end of March, so that entire salmon and steelhead fishing seasons would be captured in a single catch reporting year.

That's how we got to the fishing license year that begins April 1 and ends March 31. The regulation pamphlet (or encyclopedia, if you wish) used to be available in January, then March when the catch reporting year changed. Now it comes out after NOF because too many salmon seasons, and even steelhead and SRC seasons that get cold-cocked by the salmon negotiations, are not known until after April 15. Then it takes a while to get it all sorted out and printed, making it lucky we see it before July 1.
 

FinLuver

Active Member
#28
Wetline Dave has it closest. The timing of the fishing license year goes back to the 1970s following the US v WA court decision and long before the old WDG (and briefly the WDW) and WDF merged to form the present day WDFW. The license and punch card years used to follow the calendar year. The problem is that the winter steelhead season (mostly Dec. - Mar.) spans two calendar years.
Oregon doesn't have problems...
I don't get what's so hard about it???
 

_WW_

Geriatric Skagit Swinger
#30
A nice "side benefit" this schedule affords WDFW is that it requires most salmon and steelhead anglers to buy their new license before they know what kind of opportunities they will get to fish for those species (as was mentioned, those seasons don't get set until after North of Falcon).
Where I come from this is called "buying a pig in a poke"
 

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