Called in sick today and got lost

#1
Called in sick and put in some work to get myself up to a high river. I'm a new fly fisher and can only seem to coax the juvenile fish to take my offering, but goddamn is it fun. I'd much rather catch these wily rascals in a wilderness area - by my self surrounded by trees - than a steelhead underneath the bridge in sultan surrounded by 52 other dudes.

I've sighted very large trout in this stream on other occasions, (15+inch) but had no such luck today. I'm hoping these were not juvenile steelhead. I'll be back here later in this season to get after some of the bigger lurkers I spotted last week.


The bite was hot on a small white colored nymph pattern and a purple/brown emerger in a dry dropper configuration.

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Greg Price

Love da little fishies
#8
If you are not already using one, a 2 wt size rod will make those wild 6 inch trout feel like monsters. This is my fav kind of fishing and usually starts some time after July 4 when small streams drop into wadeable shape and the evening caddiss hatch is predictable
 
#9
If you are not already using one, a 2 wt size rod will make those wild 6 inch trout feel like monsters. This is my fav kind of fishing and usually starts some time after July 4 when small streams drop into wadeable shape and the evening caddiss hatch is predictable
Yeah I'm currently saving up for a new rod and reel combo for these types of streams. My 5 wt is much to strong.

I was thinking a 3 wt though because some of these streams hold sizeable trout. Would a 2 wt have an advantage over the 3? What length also do you like on your 2 wt for these streams and fish?

I'm a new fly Fisher and am looking to learn is why I ask
 
#12
You can pick up a Cabela's wind river 7'6" 3wt for very cheap on occasion. I got one from the bargin cave for 30 bucks a few years ago and I've put it through the ringer on small streams, warm water lakes, and just about everywhere I fish for trout. It's still going strong. Surprisingly it can sling line pretty far if I need to too.
 
#13
Beautiful spot, you wouldn't mind giving the world the coordinates, would you....Just kidding !!! Big advantage in a 3wt (or 4wt) over a 2wt is wind, but I'd recommend a 3 or 4wt in a fiberglass rod, these are the places they are at their best. Even a 4wt glass rod would be more fun (and versatile) than a 2wt in graphite imo. Many options out there but the Cabelas CGR would be good place to start. Something to think about.
 
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Greg Price

Love da little fishies
#14
When i was new, like you had an all around 6 wt. it was over kill, so my next rod was a 4 wt. Then, since i wanted something lighter and smaller, i opted for a 7'3" Echo Carbon XL.

Echo used to replace a broken rod for free if you stop by the shop near Vancouver WA. First two breaks were definitely my fault and i was completely honest with Echo when returning them.

First one i hooked a elk hair caddis in a tree and tried to jerk it out of the tree. I did not think i could break a rod with 6x tippit.

Second one i was climbing a rock waterfall, lost my hand grip and threw the rod to its demise 20 feet below me, better it than the rod.

The third time i broke it the tip just broke came off as i was casting. Tim Rajiff, owner of the Echo brand and i argued about him trying to charge 35 bucks for him to replace rod that i had brought to him. I lost, but at least i was able to get a new rod same day and did not have to wait weeks for it to be assessed and/or repaired.
 

Greg Price

Love da little fishies
#15
oh and the 7'3" is a 2 wt. I prefer it over the 4 wt 9 footer for small streams, but the 4 wt is the go to rod for panfish and basss throwing small poppers and micro leaches in lakes and ponds. I have not tried the fiberglass rods, but may be interesting to try a 3 wt fiberglass on the small stream
 

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