Best way to clean wading boots

#1
The recent thread on which states have banned felt soles got me to wondering: What is the best way to clean my wading boots after a day of fishing? Is there a method that is quick, easy and effective?
richard
 
#7
What makes you think that 48hrs in your freezer would be sufficient (just trying to learn more about it)
Living here in New England, we have had a rock snot problem for many years. All the info put out by TU and state water authorities recommend either cleaning boots in a quaternary ammonia solution, or freezing for 48 hrs. There are a few locations where organizations have provided dipping tubs to rinse boots and scrub with brush, but 99% of the time it is left to the user to do the right thing. Yes, freezing is not possible when moving between waters on the same day, but freezing will get 100% of the boot "cleaned" as opposed to washing and scrubbing which is a PITA and leaves much of the boot untouched. Freezing is also recommended for molusks/snails by USDA.
 
#9
Here is what Montana’s Fish, Wildlife and Park’s recommends:

http://fwp.mt.gov/news/newsReleases/fishing/nr_4048.html

1. Inspect. 2. Clean. 3. Dry

I’m always a bit hesitant to use any type of chemicals on my boots or waders, so I think simply cleaning them thoroughly with water is sufficient, if you are able to dry them afterwards. However, if you’re moving from one stream or river to another this may not always be practical since it can sometimes take a couple days to dry your fishing boots. I normally don’t move frequently from one watershed to another, but if I would I almost always have a backup pair, or 2, of boots and waders available.
 
#10
Living here in New England, we have had a rock snot problem for many years. All the info put out by TU and state water authorities recommend either cleaning boots in a quaternary ammonia solution, or freezing for 48 hrs. There are a few locations where organizations have provided dipping tubs to rinse boots and scrub with brush, but 99% of the time it is left to the user to do the right thing. Yes, freezing is not possible when moving between waters on the same day, but freezing will get 100% of the boot "cleaned" as opposed to washing and scrubbing which is a PITA and leaves much of the boot untouched. Freezing is also recommended for molusks/snails by USDA.
Didymo, aka "rock snot", has been proven by leading scientists to be a non-invasive species. It's not "spread" by wading boots or any other means, it's been present in waters for a very long time. It's believed that reduced phosphorous levels are responsible for the increased blooms.

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/0269249X.2014.889041
 
#12
I'll have to buy a dedicated freezer! I can just imagine what my wife would say upon opening the freezer to find my boots in there. In the mean time, I think I'll pick up a giant jug of 409.
Thanks Everyone, it's information like this that keeps me reading here.
Richard
 
#15
My Mother was tolerant of some things, the squirrel tails, buck tails, and chicken capes were no problem, but if I ever put maggots in the icebox I'd have been hit with something other than a wooden spoon. She had a distinct fondness for cutting switches from the peach trees for some reason.............
 

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