Puyallup

#1
I recently moved up to the Sumner area from SW Washington and was curious about how the salmon runs (or trout/other fish) are on the Puyallup River. My back door is a stone throw away and it would be nice to go fishing this fall before and after work
Thanks
 

wetswinger

Active Member
#2
Look at the State fishing regulations guidebook. The pinks and coho run up there by the opening day. Pay attention to the closure dates for tribal netting and hope they leave some for you....
 
#3
I also live near the river, 5 mins, but rarely fish it. I call it the pukeallup river since it is dark all summer/fall. When the fish are in, every run will be crowded. However explore, use variety of methods and you might get lucky.
 
#4
I also live near the river, 5 mins, but rarely fish it. I call it the pukeallup river since it is dark all summer/fall. When the fish are in, every run will be crowded. However explore, use variety of methods and you might get lucky.
Thanks, looking out my porch it's pretty murky now. Hopefully, it won't be too crowded since I'm on private property, it would be nice just to have a beer and a rod in the water without having to drive.
 
#5
I moved to Orting last spring. I fished the Carbon quite a bit, and the Puyallup a few times. Never once did I try to fly fish it. August and September the rivers are mud and you could probably swing up some fish by flossing/snagging which I am not into. The vast majority (99%?) of Puyallup salmon are flossed/snagged with a corkie and yarn. Never have I seen so many snaggers. It's pretty terrible, and puts fish that would willingly bite, off the bite.

I used bait (blasphemy, I know) in the glacial water and did well. Once the temps drop (early October) the rivers start to clear and you could probably find willing fish with streamers. Less fish are around though. I caught several coho on spinners in October. Lots less people in October and November, which is nice.

If you want to fish sometime let me know.
 

wetswinger

Active Member
#6
I moved to Orting last spring. I fished the Carbon quite a bit, and the Puyallup a few times. Never once did I try to fly fish it. August and September the rivers are mud and you could probably swing up some fish by flossing/snagging which I am not into. The vast majority (99%?) of Puyallup salmon are flossed/snagged with a corkie and yarn. Never have I seen so many snaggers. It's pretty terrible, and puts fish that would willingly bite, off the bite.

I used bait (blasphemy, I know) in the glacial water and did well. Once the temps drop (early October) the rivers start to clear and you could probably find willing fish with streamers. Less fish are around though. I caught several coho on spinners in October. Lots less people in October and November, which is nice.

If you want to fish sometime let me know.[/QUOT

All the fish I,ve caught on the Puyallup, using corkies and yarn were hooked nicely in the jaw. Have'nt foul hooked a one. That is BS that we are all a bunch of flossers. I now swing flys on the Puy. and guess what, several foul hook ups. WTF?
 

wetswinger

Active Member
#7
All the fish I,ve caught on the Puyallup, using corkies and yarn were hooked nicely in the jaw. Have'nt foul hooked a one. That is BS that we are all a bunch of flossers. I now swing flys on the Puy. and guess what, several foul hook ups. WTF?
 
#8
All the fish I,ve caught on the Puyallup, using corkies and yarn were hooked nicely in the jaw. Have'nt foul hooked a one. That is BS that we are all a bunch of flossers. I now swing flys on the Puy. and guess what, several foul hook ups. WTF?
You think salmon bite corkies in water with 1" of visibility? Corkie and yarn with no visibility is pretty much the definition of flossing.
 
#10
I’ve tried swinging the Puyallup and Carbon every year and have yet to hook up. Really muddy. Can get crowded but usually good natured guys. No such thing as ‘working’ a run though. Always nice to just practice the casting though.
 
#11
Try a heavily weighted, barbell and cone head, fly with a fast sink tip line. Cast slightly upstream then mend giving the fly a chance to sink. When the line comes taught it will raise and start swinging. That's the sweet spot. I've tied up some hot pink sliders to try skating across the surface. Hopefully we'll see a decent run..
 
#12
Try a heavily weighted, barbell and cone head, fly with a fast sink tip line. Cast slightly upstream then mend giving the fly a chance to sink. When the line comes taught it will raise and start swinging. That's the sweet spot. I've tied up some hot pink sliders to try skating across the surface. Hopefully we'll see a decent run..[/QUO
 

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