Advice: Boat for the Ocean

#1
I'm giving some thought to buying a platform to get out on the ocean and flyfish. I was thinking about a Boston Whaler but the rail on them looks a bit low and I can just picture myself being pitched over the side into the water. Fairly open deck space is a prime consideration. Any suggestions?
 
#8
Bow rails are the least of your worries if you're truly looking for an ocean boat. Rails can be modified. Many more important factors cannot.

No matter what if you mean ocean and not sound, self bailing should be at the top of your checklist.
 
#9
I worked on a 22ft Boston whaler for a few months. They seem to be designed to keep the crew wet. You can cut them up into pieces and still float an elephant but otherwise IMHO they suck. The ultimate boat is a Raddon. Period. 18ft to 40ft they are by far a superior hull. Anyone that has owned one knows that I tell the truth. Modern versions are labeled "Cotez" I think, but a solid Raddon hull is without parallel.
 
#11
I fished out of a center console 24’ pursuit for albacore one year. It was a really stable boat that handled rough as good as anything it’s size.

My best friends dad (Ray Manke of Tacoma) had a Buffalo from Bellingham (If I remember correctly). That was the best boat for fishing, hands down, and had no expense spared. It was comfy to sleep onboard too.
 
#12
Open ocean or inland waters?
Inside waters generally. Barkley Sound, Johnstone Strait, Nootka...Areas still capable of creating a good pounding if the weather dictates so. Presently a friend who fishes from a 12 foot Zodiac is catching coho and chinook around Port Hardy. I'd like to join him next year.
 

Chucker

Chucking a dead parrot on a piece of string!
#13
Inside waters generally. Barkley Sound, Johnstone Strait, Nootka...Areas still capable of creating a good pounding if the weather dictates so. Presently a friend who fishes from a 12 foot Zodiac is catching coho and chinook around Port Hardy. I'd like to join him next year.
Whilst I would normally say that the best kind of boat for the ocean is... someone else’s, that might not actually be true if it’s a 12’ zodiac!
 
#14
I've owned my share, big and little, aluminum and fiberglass, inboard and outboard. AL tows easy and doesn't need a big outboard so it's very economical. That light weight translates into a bouncy ride and less comfort. Fiberglass rides great but is heavy and usually requires more power which equals bigger fuel bills. For a medium-sized (18'-22') boat, with a nice ride and lots of capability, that is still towable to Port Hardy without needing an F-350 diesel, I like my 19' Tiderunner the most of any I've owned. Rides better than any equal-sized Whaler (the older Montauks are tri-hull designs that went out of favor long ago), self-bailing, has a 4 stroke on a bracket for lots of room in the cockpit, supremely stable for its size, and has lots of room to cast, front or back. I found mine for less than $12K.
 

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