Trip Report Love the Cascades

#4
very nice! What a place to catch fish. I love the spotting and color patterns on the westlope cutthroats. I'm working up the courage to do an overnight backpack solo so I can do some alpine fishing too. I've backpacked plenty, just never solo. Did you get spooked at night?
 

dekartes

Active Member
#5
No. Not much to be spooked about. My wildlife sightings are rare. If a cat or bear is close to you, just practice good food storage and they have no interest in you. Keeping food away from camp also stops rodents from chewing holes in your gear. Its a different experience by yourself, for sure. This trip i didnt make it to my final destination cause the snow was soft and the descent was more than i wanted to risk by myself. So being alone does affect decisions.
 
#6
No. Not much to be spooked about. My wildlife sightings are rare. If a cat or bear is close to you, just practice good food storage and they have no interest in you. Keeping food away from camp also stops rodents from chewing holes in your gear. Its a different experience by yourself, for sure. This trip i didnt make it to my final destination cause the snow was soft and the descent was more than i wanted to risk by myself. So being alone does affect decisions.
Sounds like a wise choice to avoid the sketchy snow descent, lol. Believe it or not I've worked on trail crews for the better part of the last 6 years and spent a lot of time camping in wilderness areas. The group mentality and having buddies with me really puts my mind at ease, even if it is all in my head - kind of like a placebo effect.

One time we were pretty remote in between snoqualmie and stevens pass and I had pitched my tent very far away from the crew. I awoke to the sound of sniffing, and large foot falls circling my tent in the dead of the night. I was incredibly spooked. My food was hung far away but whatever the fuck it was took a keen interest on my tent. After that event I've had very little motivation to sleep in the woods by myself. Carrying my firearm doesnt help non either, because at that point I'm just a scared dude in a tent with a gun in the dark. Car camp and long remote day trips are not an issue, but I hope to be able to backpack solo soon.

What region of the cascades was this trip you took in? central? North?
 
#7
very nice! What a place to catch fish. I love the spotting and color patterns on the westlope cutthroats. I'm working up the courage to do an overnight backpack solo so I can do some alpine fishing too. I've backpacked plenty, just never solo. Did you get spooked at night?
I remember probably 30 years ago going on my first overnighters solo. I was given great advice that truly helped. Camp close enough to roaring creeks and rivers so you cannot hear all the bears and monsters crawling around your camp : )

Never camp next to a quiet, dried twiggy and leafy spot. You will never sleep well that night.

Also, sand bars are not advised as those fresh bear prints in the morning circling your tent will not help the next night's sleep.

In all seriousness, just go. Nothing bad will happen (usually).
 
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dekartes

Active Member
#8
You have to think about how many prople are out each summer. When is the last time you heard of someone mauled in a shelter? Im not sure it has ever happened here. That water noise is good advise! Natures noisemaker!
 
#9
Glad to see I'm not the only one climbing solo to the high lakes. Don't mind going solo on a trail but I now get a companion if I'm going off trail. I got a bivy from REI for my solo treks. Only $150. Really light, allows room for my Wilderness Light float tube, keeps the mosquitos out but precious little room to move around in. I wouldn't want to have to rely on one in a heavy rain.

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dekartes

Active Member
#10
I saw that REI has some good UL options now. Their quarter dome SL is pretty attractive at the price point. My bivy and tarp is 12oz together. Hard to beat, although i do like tent space sometimes.
 

Kilchis

Active Member
#11
Sawyer, take it from an old coot: The spookiest thing in the woods at night is your own imagination*. It might take a few trips to adjust to solo back country camping. Maybe fade in the experience. Start with a trip or two to dispersed sites you can drive to, then commence ranging further afield.

If you're over 50 don't listen to the running water advice, it will make you want to pee every 20 minutes all night!


*Disregard this statement in grizzly country and Transylvania.
 

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