Silence no longer!

roadglideguy

Active Member
I was fishing this morning for Pinks... the river Gods smiled favorably on me! Unfortunatley though I have to bring something up that was really upsetting! What is it with people who drag fish up on the shore and do not use nets? WTF is wrong with people? It beats the hell out of the fish. I actually had someone say to me "oh it's just a pink"...I would like to see a law passed where people have to use nets to land their fish! My other pet peeve while I think of it is if you want to take your picture with the fish then you should hold your breath for the same length of time...
 

tkww

Member
It takes a long time to correct "wisdom" or "how you do it" that gets passed on--generations. Without better examples, most people simply never consider it. But unless this state gets serious about enforcement, any and all regulations are just suggestions. People only follow speed limits because they know the risk of a ticket is real.
 

Porter

Well-Known Member
I was fishing this morning for Pinks... the river Gods smiled favorably on me! Unfortunatley though I have to bring something up that was really upsetting! What is it with people who drag fish up on the shore and do not use nets? WTF is wrong with people? It beats the hell out of the fish. I actually had someone say to me "oh it's just a pink"...I would like to see a law passed where people have to use nets to land their fish! My other pet peeve while I think of it is if you want to take your picture with the fish then you should hold your breath for the same length of time...
Using a 12 weight.... sorry. :p:D
 

roadglideguy

Active Member
The sad reality of it is as global warming progresses (in spite of the naysayers) our much sought after Spring, Sockeye and Coho stock are going to be a thing of the past ...the salmon that are going to survive are the Pink and Chum... they tolerate warmer water temperatures. We need to look ahead and consider their conservation (and protection)!
 

Jim Darden

Active Member
The sad reality of it is as global warming progresses (in spite of the naysayers) our much sought after Spring, Sockeye and Coho stock are going to be a thing of the past ...the salmon that are going to survive are the Pink and Chum... they tolerate warmer water temperatures. We need to look ahead and consider their conservation (and protection)!
The reason the chum survive is because the commercial guys haven't figured out how to target them.
 

FinLuver

Active Member
My other pet peeve while I think of it is if you want to take your picture with the fish then you should hold your breath for the same length of time...
I usually do, so as not to shake too much, while I snap multiple poses. :p
Truthfully though, I do hold my breath when I snap a photo of fish or just about anything else.:)
 

Jake

(not really a sea otter)
My other pet peeve while I think of it is if you want to take your picture with the fish then you should hold your breath for the same length of time...
Or run a mile and have someone immediately after hold their head in a bucket of water for long enough to take several posed photos.

Personally I’ve hit peak “grip and grin” and would like to see people taking other shots. For like $20 you can get a done for a GoPro and do one of those half-underwater, half-above water photos. Tail the fish and photograph while it’s in the water.
 

Old Man

Just an Old Man
I watched a gal on the main Stilly lansd a King on the gravel bar drag, it up the bar unhook it and then kick it back into the river. I was on the opposite bank fishing for Sea Runs. I just shook my head. This was before I ever got on a computer.
 

Mickeyd

Active Member
The sad reality of it is as global warming progresses (in spite of the naysayers) our much sought after Spring, Sockeye and Coho stock are going to be a thing of the past ...the salmon that are going to survive are the Pink and Chum... they tolerate warmer water temperatures. We need to look ahead and consider their conservation (and protection)!
Why didn't Spring, Sockeye, and Coho stocks disappear during the last global warming cycles?
 

Jake

(not really a sea otter)
Why didn't Spring, Sockeye, and Coho stocks disappear during the last global warming cycles?
I’m no expert, but off the top of my head I’d say it’s
likely because it was far more gradual, and because there wasn’t human-caused habitat destruction, toxic runoff, human-caused pollution, cattle in streams, diked and dammed rivers, water reservoirs, commercial harvest, tribal harvest, mine tailings, culverts, etc.
 

Mark Dankel

Active Member
I learn a lot of stuff on the forums. (Kinda' hard not to when you start late in life and the slope of your learning curve is straight up...) One thing is how to photograph a fish. This was taken by Jan Fredrik Lund (Norway) and posted on his own website: www.paintthewater.comJanFredrikLund.jpg
 

mikemac1

Active Member
I got a chuckle when I read the original post. Dragging fish onshore is not good practice—UNLESS. Been doing a lot of research on Barramundi fishing in the Northern Territory of Australia. Got a month long trip planned next March including a week in Darwin chasing Barra. Recently watched a You Tube video from a Helifish outfit where an angler was standing on a sand spit a good 10 feet from the water and catching Barra after Barra. The guide had a 10 foot long boga grip deal and would reach down to the waters edge and drag the Barra ashore. On his hip was a large caliber automatic pistol. Bear Spray doesn’t work on Saltwater Crocodiles.

In the fishing advice section for Kakadu National Park, just east of Darwin — kinda the Yellowstone of Australia, there’s this to say.

*
Be Crocwise: Fishing and boating
* Be alert when fishing on riverbanks. When fishing from the bank fish five metres from the water’s edge. Try to fish with an obstacle such as a rock in front of you.
* Do not enter the water when fishing.
* Don’t stand on logs overhanging the water while fishing or when retrieving lures.
* Be extra vigilant when fishing alone or where a croc can approach you from behind.
* Don’t take dogs fishing with you. Their presence may attract crocs.
* Crocodiles can attack and take people from boats. The smaller the boat the greater the risk. Don’t use or sleep in boats with low sides.
* All non-powered vessels are prohibited in Kakadu.
* Take extreme care when launching and retrieving boats. Crocodiles are known to gather at boat ramps, jettys and launching sites. Avoid entering the water.
* Don’t ever hang arms, legs or any part of your body out of or lean over the edge of a boat when on the water. This includes boats near or at the shoreline.
* Crocodiles can lunge at and can follow fish onto your boat so always use landing nets when retrieving a fish.
* Wear polarising sunglasses to help spot crocodiles near the surface of the water.
* If night fishing illuminate the outside of your boat to help see what is around you and be extra vigilant.
* Do not clean fish while on the water.
 

FinLuver

Active Member
I’m no expert, but off the top of my head I’d say it’s
likely because it was far more gradual, and because there wasn’t human-caused habitat destruction, toxic runoff, human-caused pollution, cattle in streams, diked and dammed rivers, water reservoirs, commercial harvest, tribal harvest, mine tailings, culverts, etc.
I'm no expert, but ya probably could have said just one word...

MAN
 
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