Trip Report Blue line fishing

Buzzy

Active Member
This little creek is way the heck n gone out there. Some places you have the hazard of overhanging trees and deadfall, other sections it is wide open. Today it was bright and sunny and hot. Wet wading felt really good, especially for @Engee since he slipped and fell in three times. Spaz - seriously though, he was wearing worn out running shoes, I was wearing felt wading boots.
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Engee drew the first overhead snag (we both had several). I only lost one fly to a branch I couldn't reach and 5X tippet doesn't bend deadwood very far.
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When we found pools like the one below, we'd take turns casting our dry flies into the run. Eastern brook and cutthroat trout were eager. The creek is fast and tumbles down the mountain; most places the trout don't have a long time to inspect offerings.
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Engee started out slow but he caught on and caught a lot of fish. He was fishing an Echo Glass 378 - what a sweet little rod.
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I didn't see many insects flying in the air besides a few carpenter ants, a couple wasps and some pesky houseflies. No 'skeeters, no rattlers, no grizzly bears, no ticks, no wolves, no mountain lions, no cougars. But I did see some big split shucks.
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I'm a fan of deer hair to help keep small flies floating and a Goddard caddis is one of my favorites. This one accounted for perhaps 50 fish sneaking a peak or trying to eat it.
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The trout are small but amazingly beautiful. Look how broad the tail is on this little fish. My 2 weight FethaStik bends deep with a fish this "big".
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Hard to believe it but no snags on the submerged wood, that branch to the left - that's another story.
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I'm always fascinated by some of what nature offers up. Engee saw this rock embedded in the roots of a long dead tree, pretty cool.
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@Old Man Jim is right, the blue lines can offer a lot of fun.
 

PV_Premier

Active Member
Great post. I haven’t made enough time for this type of nonsense this summer. Need to find time soon before steelhead become a distraction again.
 

Jim Ficklin

Genuine Montana Fossil
Very nice report, Pat! Looks like you folks had a wonderful time. That does appear to be felt sole submerged terrain.
 

Buzzy

Active Member
Very nice report, Pat! Looks like you folks had a wonderful time. That does appear to be felt sole submerged terrain.
Jim -
I didn't realize how tired I was from the exercise of trying to get a 70 year old man around, over, on top of and sliding on huge boulders, and then the trees, stumps and logs. We stopped to have a late lunch on the way home - I almost fell asleep waiting for my cup of coffee. Yes sir, the felts were necessary.

I joked about not seeing certain critters or "rattlers". Pretty high up on the mountains but I did see a timber rattler at the stream mouth. Timber rattlers can make the little Basin rattlers look like toys.
 

Jim Ficklin

Genuine Montana Fossil
Everything I have read documents that the only Rattlesnake in WA is the Western Rattlesnake, "Rattlesnakes in eastern Washington are western rattlesnakes or Crotalus viridis. " We had Prairie Rattlers in Montana. "The Timber rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus) also commonly known as canebrake rattlesnake or banded rattlesnake, is a species of venomous pit viper found in the eastern region of the United States." There were folks who claimed that Timber Rattlers were along the Klickitat, but that has not been proven true. I have seen some rather large rattlesnakes in my Washington state wanderings, but they were all westerns which are fairly docile & non-aggressive unless stepped-on or otherwise threatened and don't pose near the threat that Timber Rattlers do.
 

Old Man

Just an Old Man
I've been here in Montana for almost 13 years now. I have yet to even see a Rattlesnake here. I've seen some big Garter Snakes. I don't pay attention on what critters are in the woods when I go fishing. They all need to look out for me.
 

Jim Ficklin

Genuine Montana Fossil
I've been here in Montana for almost 13 years now. I have yet to even see a Rattlesnake here.
No Rattlers around Butte/Anaconda/Deer Lodge; even Garter & Water Snakes are a rare find. Maiden Rock Canyon on the lower Big Hole hosts some Rattlers, as does the Hogback area near Dillon. Supposedly there are a few Prairie Rattlers around Drummond, but I never saw any in the area. I'm surprised that you never saw any on the road in all your travels around BSC. We ran into a few down there while hunting Antelope & Sage Hens in early September, as well as in the Beartrap & around Pony.
 

Buzzy

Active Member
Everything I have read documents that the only Rattlesnake in WA is the Western Rattlesnake, "Rattlesnakes in eastern Washington are western rattlesnakes or Crotalus viridis. " We had Prairie Rattlers in Montana. "The Timber rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus) also commonly known as canebrake rattlesnake or banded rattlesnake, is a species of venomous pit viper found in the eastern region of the United States." There were folks who claimed that Timber Rattlers were along the Klickitat, but that has not been proven true. I have seen some rather large rattlesnakes in my Washington state wanderings, but they were all westerns which are fairly docile & non-aggressive unless stepped-on or otherwise threatened and don't pose near the threat that Timber Rattlers do.
Okay - let's just say that the snake up where I was in the mountains was many times larger (longer, fatter) than any rattler I've ever seen in the Basin. Conservatively 3X as big. Darc (Desert Fly Angler) had a picture of a rattler from Keller Ferry area that was as long as he was tall (if my so called memory serves). :D
 
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