Pikeminnows (squawfish) problem all over lowers of Chehalis Tribs

Gyrfalcon2015

Wild Trout
I’ve fished these rivers since a young’n and never noticed quite the quantity. @Gyrfalcon2015, a proper study would be a strong sample size of which is almost impossible as a solo slinger, hens the posting to gather data. Don’t be such a keyboard warrior brother bear. @Shad I never said to eliminate the problem, but rather manage the situation. And I never claimed they were trash fish, I could care less about stupid labels, but do find their eating habit might be conducive to a thriving game population. Granted I don’t consider pikeminnow/squaws a game fish by any means, still fun to catch I guess but that is beside the point of this thread. @Buzzy yup released them all, have no want to kill them or eat, you don’t want to give them public housing and a fish kitchen too do you? I’m just yanking your chain since this thread has turned into hoots and hollers. :D
My point is how spooky it is for asking for the collective heads of a species because of a small sampling, adding derogatory names to a fish that internet people often misread as true fact without fully researching or putting out the question to some of fish biologists on this site, of which we are lucky to have contribute.

I see it every year with a group of Trumpeter Swans we have locally here. 100-150 birds sit in our fields throughout the Winter. Families, birdwatchers will most often say how they have never seen any in their lifetime. "How rare" ...
Many hunters come by and don't understand why there is not a season on them because they are "so common here." They look common in THAT field, to those local hunters, eventhough they are a pretty much stationary, non-moving group for 4 months.

Perception can be deadly when it comes to estimating populations, especially hard to count aquatic species. Err on the side of caution is usually wisest in the end.

My three cents
 
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Dustin Bise

Hot-spotting Sheriff.
Well humans hump a lot too with certain generations more than others, that’s a different story leading to over-pressuring food systems that we don’t need to go there.

But we can’t change that, we can however change this.
so we should destroy yet another native species for what??? it would gain nothing....
 
Our rivers can only sustain healthy populations of native predators (e.g., pikeminnow in this instance, but substitute osprey, merganser, otter, bull trout, etc.) if there is a healthy population of prey. As sport fishermen, we should always be pleased to see those predators on the rivers we fish as evidence that the resources we cherish are doing okay. Viewing native predators as competition for the same resource we pursue, and taking steps, whether through regulation or individual action has led to some of the most serious wildlife problems we have today.
 

Divad

Catch & Release
@Gyrfalcon2015 in which case I would prefer a biologist stand point, instead of hearing from you continue on about a naming problem. Which is so far from the point of this topic. During my lifetime I’ve seen this happen so many times with groups, at one time we called natives Indians, then native Americans, and now the proper term is indigenous(?). My point is don’t let naming conventions spin your panties so tight that you subtract yourself from the issue at hand. I simply added both names as some people purely refer to them as such.

Typically issues are observed and deliberated on, before throwing dollars at sampling procedures, and thus the reasoning of my post. Nobody goes into a study without a thesis or background :p

I know these are native along with suckers, had both of them on my lines countless times before. Just saying that it seems like the population has far exceeded other species to where I am wondering if it is a problem. Furthermore I’ve never noticed them as far up both tribs in the past.
 

Divad

Catch & Release
Our rivers can only sustain healthy populations of native predators (e.g., pikeminnow in this instance, but substitute osprey, merganser, otter, bull trout, etc.) if there is a healthy population of prey. As sport fishermen, we should always be pleased to see those predators on the rivers we fish as evidence that the resources we cherish are doing okay. Viewing native predators as competition for the same resource we pursue, and taking steps, whether through regulation or individual action has led to some of the most serious wildlife problems we have today.
I would agree completely, but that doesn’t mean one should be scared of action. Just that action should be scrutinized more carefully.
 

Gyrfalcon2015

Wild Trout
@Gyrfalcon2015 in which case I would prefer a biologist stand point, instead of hearing from you continue on about a naming problem. Which is so far from the point of this topic. During my lifetime I’ve seen this happen so many times with groups, at one time we called natives Indians, then native Americans, and now the proper term is indigenous(?). My point is don’t let naming conventions spin your panties so tight that you subtract yourself from the issue at hand. I simply added both names as some people purely refer to them as such.

Typically issues are observed and deliberated on, before throwing dollars at sampling procedures, and thus the reasoning of my post. Nobody goes into a study without a thesis or background :p

I know these are native along with suckers, had both of them on my lines countless times before. Just saying that it seems like the population has far exceeded other species to where I am wondering if it is a problem. Furthermore I’ve never noticed them as far up both tribs in the past.
Oh, I was just referencing you calling out the species as "bastards" or some dark inference.
As far as Pikeminnow/ Squawfish naming, we all know how stuff works, was not calling you out on that.

Proper is only to use the Latin names, but who wants to do that?

I actually do have professional fish population calculating experience, worked in field electroshocking studies at EWU-mostly working on the Pend Oreille River in the 90's, and then did my time behind a scope at the Ichthyology lab of UCUT. My name is in published studies if you'd like a reference. Our job was sampling and studying populations, fish prey, etc.
Perhaps I should have added that so you would know I was not just a "internet big bear"..but wanted to defer to the true career fisheries biologists we luckily have on here with many decades of field time in, of which I am not one.

Not calling you out, but just adding my experience. Hey, maybe the population has exploded, but need to be cautious, all I was adding.

I know we are all on the same side, trying to enhance the fisheries to their greatest potential.
 
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FinLuver

Active Member
Finally: I've caught both suckers and pikeminnow while fishing for trout, salmon, and steelhead in those rivers, but it's a rare occurrence in general. I find it interesting that you guys caught so many without targeting them (which I honestly don't know how to do, except that I have found they eat bait more readily than artificials). If you don't mind a little hotspotting, what flies were you using? (I might want to keep that in my back pocket for the next time I'm getting brutally skunked on the Nooch and need to feel the rod bend!)
Breaded and deep fried chicken strips... ;)
They are a blast to target!! :D
 
Don't forget peamouth and chiselmouth, both minnows as well. I've seen plenty of them tossed dead in the bushes under mistaken identity. Suckers do seem to bear the brunt of it behind pikeminnow though.

Pikeminnow are cool, but a chiselmouth with spawning tubercles takes the cake for me.
 

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