Pikeminnows (squawfish) problem all over lowers of Chehalis Tribs

Tobe Hagge

New Member
I catch (smaller) pikeminnows in the lower Yakima from time to time, while fishing for non-native sport fish. It's never been clear to me why they seem to get a worse rap than carp, which grow as thick as my leg in that river and from what I understand are an unmitigated nuisance.
 
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GAT

Dumbfounded
Of course some folks believe a Mountain Whitefish is a "trash fish", but it is listed, at least in Oregon, as a game fish. Now, why the whitefish is considered a game fish and the NPM is not isn't exactly clear to me. I've caught some 20-inch NPM at Foster Reservoir and they hit like a freight train and put up a heck of a fight ... for awhile.
 

Gyrfalcon2015

Wild Trout
Of course some folks believe a Mountain Whitefish is a "trash fish", but it is listed, at least in Oregon, as a game fish. Now, why the whitefish is considered a game fish and the NPM is not isn't exactly clear to me. I've caught some 20-inch NPM at Foster Reservoir and they hit like a freight train and put up a heck of a fight ... for awhile.
NPM are one of my favorites to catch, as a kid they were the first fish to readily hit my first ugly, self-tied flies.
Big NPM are a gamefish in my eyes. Predators like Bull Trout, no doubt.

Someone can jump in, but I think the Whitefishes, having an adipose fin, are Salmonidae family and very closely related to the rest of the all salmon, trout, lenok and taimen, grayling, where as the Northern Pikeminnow are larger members of the Cyprinidae minnow family, a bit older in the evolutionary scheme.

I think the Whitefish family lineage plays a big part of inclusion in gamefish.
 
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dustinchromers

Active Member
The ones you are seeing are no doubt suckers. The ones you are catching are likely pike minnow. They've always been thick in there. The schools of them holding on tail outs are not pike minnow. And as far as destroying game fish? That's been done already. Soon all there will be to catch is pike minnow and some fly fishing rag will be prattling on about the majestic predatory fish as a trophy species.
 

dflett68

Active Member
Someone can jump in, but I think the Whitefishes, having an adipose fin, are Salmonidae family and very closely related to the rest of the all salmon, trout, lenok and taimen, grayling, where as the Northern Pikeminnow are larger members of the Cyprinidae minnow family, a bit older in the evolutionary scheme.

I think the Whitefish family lineage plays a big part of inclusion in gamefish.
i'd love to see the experts jump in and really talk about taxonmy along those lines, kindof pull back the veil for us laypeople. i get that a whitefish has an adipose fin, but is that one vestigial trait really what lumps it into salmonidae, when there so much else that seems untroutlike? meanwhile, the golden dorado also has an adipose fin, and looks/acts for all the world like an exotic salmon, but is lumped with pirahnas and tetras - while in an ironically named genus "Salminus". i trust there's more to it, but sometimes this stuff seems pretty arbitrary from the outside.
 

Gyrfalcon2015

Wild Trout
i'd love to see the experts jump in and really talk about taxonmy along those lines, kindof pull back the veil for us laypeople. i get that a whitefish has an adipose fin, but is that one vestigial trait really what lumps it into salmonidae, when there so much else that seems untroutlike? meanwhile, the golden dorado also has an adipose fin, and looks/acts for all the world like an exotic salmon, but is lumped with pirahnas and tetras - while in an ironically named genus "Salminus". i trust there's more to it, but sometimes this stuff seems pretty arbitrary from the outside.
Made a mistake by mentioning the adipose as meaning anything, I think.

I agree, bring out the taxonomists on here and set us straight !

Golden Dorado needs to be brought into the salmon family, even if honorarily : )
 
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