NFR Rant: I’m no huge tree hugger, but this is a crime.

KerryS

Ignored Member
Our community has a lot of units and i say in a crowd you can always hide. We could move, but then what if i get a next door neighbor who is horrible and has a terrible yard or a bunch of broken down cars in front or a continuous barking dog? There is not much you can do about it and a couple of bad neighbors is not easy to ignore. In a condo you can because here we have more friends here than those we can’t stand.

What ever you do don’t move to the hills above Sedro Woolley. Most of what you described are required to live up here. Also, owning any number of guns and shooting them from dawn to dusk.
 

Jojo

A sometimes eternal optimist
WFF Supporter
Why give her songs with a beat when you can play this banger:
Hahahahahaha.... LOVE This torture music! THAT is horrible! I would definitely have to leave the house to play that!

I actually like some hip hop music and could listen to it and i know she would hate hate hate it!

@herkileez, The ground on our side of that tree is always kind of wet too and in fact our front area is landscaped with topsoil and beauty bark, no sod. They took out a maple in front of our place in 1993 (without notice) because it lifted the sidewalk slightly. Since that time there is no more lifting and neither is the exposed aggregate on the pool patio side lifted anywhere that i can see.

I would have to measure, but the tree is positioned about 15 feet from the shallow end of the pool.
 

chadk

Be the guide...
It's not like there is a shortage of trees. I can understand appreciating and become somewhat attached to one, but like others have said, unless you buy land and don't have an HOA, you just have to deal with that kind of thing. Clear cuts and forest fires look ugly at first, but they increase the biodiversity and quickly become prime habitat for many forest animals. People like to cry about a clear cut or forest fire and how terrible they look, but that is short sighted - it is just part of the cycle of life. Like beavers creating a meadow where a forest used to stand - change isn't bad.
 

Buzzy

Active Member
I would have to measure, but the tree is positioned about 15 feet from the shallow end of the pool.
I planted arborvitae as privacy screen along a retaining wall on the east side of our lot. Can't recall the timeframe but the raised beds that are up to 15 feet from the wall became tangled and choked with arborvitae roots, they simply loved the drip system that kept the three beds irrigated. The end of the privacy screen came when the roots got into the 68 year old sewer line. Roto guys and me with a chainsaw.
 

KerryS

Ignored Member
It's not like there is a shortage of trees. I can understand appreciating and become somewhat attached to one, but like others have said, unless you buy land and don't have an HOA, you just have to deal with that kind of thing. Clear cuts and forest fires look ugly at first, but they increase the biodiversity and quickly become prime habitat for many forest animals. People like to cry about a clear cut or forest fire and how terrible they look, but that is short sighted - it is just part of the cycle of life. Like beavers creating a meadow where a forest used to stand - change isn't bad.
The issue I have with clear cut, plant and repeat forestry is it doesn’t increase biodiversity. When clear cuts are replanted they use a single, man made, fast growing hybrid tree throughout. Mono forestry.
 

Gyrfalcon21

Active Member
And to add, there is a reason giant old growth trees ruled large areas of the Pacific Northwest coast. To think clear cutting and re-planting in managed forests of smaller trees is fully the way to go for a fully healthy diversity of fauna is a bit shortsighted, but modern man has no patience for such things as "leaving it as you found it" because it worked fine before.

We are ruthless consumers and the thirst only grows as we find buyers overseas for our timber.
 
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bconrad

Active Member
That’s a Leyland Cypress IMO. A lot of people confuse them with Western red cedar. Could also be an incense cedar as was mentioned earlier, but in this area there are a lot of Leyland’s planted In the wrong place because people buy them at Home Depot and have no idea how big they get. Also agree, 6 days to cut that thing down is a joke.

Sorry about your experience though, to remove a tree like that with no notice is a crock.
 

Charles Sullivan

Active Member
And to add, there is a reason giant old growth trees ruled large areas of the Pacific Northwest coast. To think clear cutting and re-planting in managed forests of smaller trees is fully the way to go for a fully healthy diversity of fauna is a bit shortsighted, but modern man has no patience for such things as "leaving it as you found it" because it worked fine before.

We are ruthless consumers and the thirst only grows as we find buyers overseas for our timber.

Very true. The change in hydrology is another huge problem. Young trees drink a bunch more. Less water gets t our streams.

In the future, I would hope we could get our fiber in a less impactful manner.

Go Sox,
cds
 

Bruce Baker

Active Member
Hey Jojo,
Better than hip hop, try the Gyoto Monks, throat singing from Mongolia. I personally like it, but I think I am the only one. The FBI used it to try to flush one of the crazy compound guys a few years back.
richard
Have you heard of Tanya Tagaq CM? She is a Canadian throat singer and was profiled on 60 Minutes.
 

Jojo

A sometimes eternal optimist
WFF Supporter
Have you heard of Tanya Tagaq CM? She is a Canadian throat singer and was profiled on 60 Minutes.
Oh my gosh.... @Bruce Baker , I never knew this was a thing, throat singing? People like this stuff? This is pretty funny only i would be afraid that people would think that was ME inside my house making those noises!
 

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