Newbie Advice

Rob Allen

Active Member
No doubt it is the most entertaining and educational beginner's flyfishing book ever penned.

I recommend it to every novice fly angler.

I recommend it to all the experts who think they know more about fly fishing than there is to actually know about fly fishing.
 

Jojo

Trout Thank Me
Take casting lessons until casting is easier and a more natural motion that you don’t have to consciously think about.
I think learning to cast is very similar to learning to drive a stick!

Because i am not fond of fishing from boats i hired a guide to wade in with me. That way i didn’t feel trapped with the guide service and if I wanted to quit before 6 or 8 hours i could.
 

Skip Enge

Uck Uck Uck, bitches
Take good care of yourself...With longevity comes accidental knowledge and peace...Love of the water, respect for it and all that incidental knowledge that feeds the spirit and why you love it so. The details only matter to you and concurrently you build a philosophy for a lifelong pursuit of brandishing that magic wand..
 

Rob Allen

Active Member
In terms of enjoyment, i think learning to really cast well brings a lot..

I know that if nothing else i can make a beautiful cast and that just feels good.

We are foreign objects when we enter the water but if my cast looks like it belongs there it makes me feel good.
 

Jojo

Trout Thank Me
In terms of enjoyment, i think learning to really cast well brings a lot..

I know that if nothing else i can make a beautiful cast and that just feels good.

We are foreign objects when we enter the water but if my cast looks like it belongs there it makes me feel good.
I feel the same way. It’s the one part of fly fishing where i appear to seem to know what i’m doing. My casting teacher many years ago told me that women are better learning to cast well because they don’t power the line and are more patient. He also told me my presentation was best in the class which of course i basked in the glow of doing something well that i didn’t know much about. My cast might be why when i catch a fish it always pretty much hooks itself and always right on the lip, easy to take out. (I’m terrible about setting the hook, i need the fish to do all the work!)

I used to practice in front of a picture window so i could see my back cast in the reflection and see where i was executing my forward cast too soon.

I still practice casting before a trip because as i’ve gotten older i realize i tend to get lazy with it. And i don’t fish like y’all do and my arm gets tired and hurts the next day if i don’t.
 

YAKIMA

AKA: Gregory Mine
I feel the same way. It’s the one part of fly fishing where i appear to seem to know what i’m doing. My casting teacher many years ago told me that women are better learning to cast well because they don’t power the line and are more patient. He also told me my presentation was best in the class which of course i basked in the glow of doing something well that i didn’t know much about. My cast might be why when i catch a fish it always pretty much hooks itself and always right on the lip, easy to take out. (I’m terrible about setting the hook, i need the fish to do all the work!)

I used to practice in front of a picture window so i could see my back cast in the reflection and see where i was executing my forward cast too soon.

I still practice casting before a trip because as i’ve gotten older i realize i tend to get lazy with it. And i don’t fish like y’all do and my arm gets tired and hurts the next day if i don’t.
Advil...
 

Brian Miller

Be vewy vewy qwiet, I'm hunting Cutthwoat Twout
+2 on Curtis Creek Manifesto. My first book and have given away a few copies to new anglers.
I'd also suggest two Dave Hughes books; Reading the Water, and Trout in Small Streams.
 

Rob Allen

Active Member
I feel the same way. It’s the one part of fly fishing where i appear to seem to know what i’m doing. My casting teacher many years ago told me that women are better learning to cast well because they don’t power the line and are more patient. He also told me my presentation was best in the class which of course i basked in the glow of doing something well that i didn’t know much about. My cast might be why when i catch a fish it always pretty much hooks itself and always right on the lip, easy to take out. (I’m terrible about setting the hook, i need the fish to do all the work!)

I used to practice in front of a picture window so i could see my back cast in the reflection and see where i was executing my forward cast too soon.

I still practice casting before a trip because as i’ve gotten older i realize i tend to get lazy with it. And i don’t fish like y’all do and my arm gets tired and hurts the next day if i don’t.

It's the only thing i have ever been good at.

I am a dunce at everything, until you put a fishing rod in my hands.
 

Brian Miller

Be vewy vewy qwiet, I'm hunting Cutthwoat Twout
Here's some more thoughts.
IMHO small to mid-sized (~20 feet across at the widest) are good to learn on for several reasons.
1. Don't require long casts, 25 ft is more than enough. More than 30 ft is excessive and pointless. The shorter distance is easier for a new angler to learn how to accurately cast a fly.
2. Small streams have all the elements of larger water but they're less complex and easier to learn and apply "reading" skills.
3. Wading is usually easier and safer.
4. Fish in small streams are often smaller (but not always:)), more aggressive and will readily take a fly.
5. Landing smaller fish is usually going to require less skill than the nuances required for larger fish.
6. Can be less angling competition because they're often overlooked by many fishermen looking for larger fish.
 

SilverFly

Active Member
One piece of advise you would tell a new aspiring Fly Fisherman?

Several pieces of advice but ... listen to the good advice here, learn to cast well, learn to read water, don't chase reports, find a stream or lake you like and let it be your teacher.

Beyond that, also be open to new things.

Yes, chasing bass and panfish would be one of those. Carp, absolutely great and under-rated gamefish. Shad would be another worth checking out.

Steelhead opportunities still exist but should be chosen with care, and low expectations of catching. I remember what it was like when steelheading was good, and prefer to preserve those memories instead of poisoning them with the vitriole and angst the sport is saturated with now.

Saltwater in general offers much more in terms of both opportunity and variety. If I lived anywhere near the Sound I'd be a full-on SRC/resident coho junky. Virtually year-round fishing, plenty of elbow room (usually) and great fish. If you have any explorer tendencies there are other species that are largely ignored by fly fishers. Surf, piling, and striped seaperch come to mind.

We also have a world class fishery off our coasts every summer that apparently doesn't exist for 99.7% of fly fishermen/women in the PNW. Boggles my mind that only a handful of folks with bugsticks chase albacore tuna. Yeah, who wants to catch 15-30# fish that can be picky as a spring-creek trout and swim at freeway speeds.

BTW, this year we also have confirmed catches of dorado, yellowtail (hamachi), mako shark, striped marlin, and bluefin tuna to 120#. All species that can and have been taken on fly gear (elsewhere) ... but fishing sucks in Washington.
 
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castsN2trees

It's not an addiction because I don't want to quit
1pc of advise....concentrate on having fun....the most fun thing about fishing is catching...so fish in situations where you have a strong chance of catching multiple fish an outing, like bluegill with poppers....you won't see bream on the cover of many fly fishing magazines, or the subject of many books, but you will learn the fundamentals of fly fishing (casting, knot tying, hooking fish) and you'll have fun the whole time...

Don't worry about expensive gear....a $900 fly rod is no more fun than a $25 fly rod....a $500 reel doesn't help you catch more fish....and $129 fly line won't make much difference in your casting....especially in the beginning...wait to buy nice gear after you have figured out that you plan to stick with it for a long while...and after you realize exactly what you want from the gear...

if you are lucky, you'll fish for decades....I've been doing it for 29yrs....and I still can't sleep the night before I go fishing.....

so have fun...
 

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Dustin Bise

Hot-spotting Sheriff.
Can you elaborate on that?
even basic fly rods are pretty good these days. but not all lines are equal. a good line floats well, mends well, and casts well. if there is a place on the setup to go all out, its the line. 100 bucks gets you into a great line.
 

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