Newbie Advice

c-dawg

Active Member
Plus 1 on Curtis Creek Manifesto, it's an excellent all-around intro (and funny).
That was the first book I read on fly fishing when it was originally published. Fast forward nearly 40 years when my adult son finally developed an interest in fly fishing (I know, late bloomer), I gave him that book to get started.
 

Old Man

Just an Old Man
even basic fly rods are pretty good these days. but not all lines are equal. a good line floats well, mends well, and casts well. if there is a place on the setup to go all out, its the line. 100 bucks gets you into a great line.
A great line can be bought for as little as 14 bucks. A expensive line can also be a piece of shit line. I have also had one of those. The line I paid 14 Dollars for I bought from Allen Fly Fishing. I used it for about 6 or 7 years. I just wanted a change when I replaced this year. I paid 16 dollars for it's replacement. The 14i dollar line I could fish it right off the reel no stretching needed. It was a 4wt line.

I had one of those Cortland 555 5wt lines which was a piece of crap. Everytime I used it I had to stretch it. It didn't even matter that I used it everyday I still had to stretch it. It just got to be a bother. So I shit canned it. I think I paid 80 dollars for it new. I replaced it with a demo line which lasted for about 5 years. I have since replaced that line. Another 80 dollar line.
 

teedub

Active Member
Make it a rule that each time you fish, sit and watch the water before plunging in. Look for obvious things, but also look for things that are not obvious. Rising fish, weather (wind, sun, temp and pressure changes) bird activity, bugs in the air and on the water, current seams, cover, clarity, predators and many more. Then use what you see to help you fish.
 

Rock Creek Fan

Active Member
@teedub great advice. Many times fish are near the edge of the river and walking into the water just spoiled your chances of catching them... If they are feeding, are they sipping, flashing, leaping/splashing or digging near the bottom ? What is the pattern (frequency) of each fish eating?
 
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Dustin Bise

Hot-spotting Sheriff.
A great line can be bought for as little as 14 bucks. A expensive line can also be a piece of shit line. I have also had one of those. The line I paid 14 Dollars for I bought from Allen Fly Fishing. I used it for about 6 or 7 years. I just wanted a change when I replaced this year. I paid 16 dollars for it's replacement. The 14i dollar line I could fish it right off the reel no stretching needed. It was a 4wt line.

I had one of those Cortland 555 5wt lines which was a piece of crap. Everytime I used it I had to stretch it. It didn't even matter that I used it everyday I still had to stretch it. It just got to be a bother. So I shit canned it. I think I paid 80 dollars for it new. I replaced it with a demo line which lasted for about 5 years. I have since replaced that line. Another 80 dollar line.
never claimed all expensive line was good.
 

Old Man

Just an Old Man
Make it a rule that each time you fish, sit and watch the water before plunging in. Look for obvious things, but also look for things that are not obvious. Rising fish, weather (wind, sun, temp and pressure changes) bird activity, bugs in the air and on the water, current seams, cover, clarity, predators and many more. Then use what you see to help you fish.
I know of a creek here in Montana that you won't see any fish. But hold your arm out over the water and the fish will scatter, From the bottom to the top. They will come out from behind rocks and sunken logs. Watch that piece of water for a while and they will come back to their lies.

Shit, I should go back one more time before it starts to get cold. But it's about 100 miles one way. The drive kind of tires me out.
 

Jake

(not really a sea otter)
never claimed all expensive line was good.
Especially if you’re fishing the salt. Rio is
I know of a creek here in Montana that you won't see any fish. But hold your arm out over the water and the fish will scatter, From the bottom to the top. They will come out from behind rocks and sunken logs. Watch that piece of water for a while and they will come back to their lies.

Shit, I should go back one more time before it starts to get cold. But it's about 100 miles one way. The drive kind of tires me out.
I’ll drive you there next summer, if you’d like.
 

Jake

(not really a sea otter)
If I'm still alive.
Ok. If we’re both still alive, and you’re still fishing, I’ll take you up there. Hell, I’ll take you up there even if you aren’t still fishing just for the stories, piss, and vinegar.
 
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