Who wants to try tuna?

SilverFly

Active Member
I mean, obviously you are using fly rod, but does it work for multiple clients to fly fish, or have a mix of fly and gear people?
And to specifically answer the "mix" aspect I can speak from personal experience. The answer is yes - given some limitations. In the typical "bait stop" situation, I think it works just fine to have one or two guys fly fishing but crew experience makes a huge difference. Fast sinking lines also play much better in general due to less current drift and simply getting down and hooked up quicker. The other thing is fly fishers actually NEED one or two at a given time fishing conventional to keep fish hooked, and the school at the boat.
 
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SilverFly

Active Member
I'm still cleaning up my boat from our trip on Friday. The fishing now is as good as I've ever experienced.
View attachment 211529
I see your bloody tuna, and raise you four...ty more!

From the gear crew today that could, nay should, have been FOUR Washington Fly Fishing members (calm.. breathe in ... breathe out ...) Horribly rough ocean today too.

Hey look, gear slinging gals like to catch tuna too! Love it! Have a hunch she out-fished all 3 of those guys. A bit smaller grade of fish but those are actually super-fun 12wt size. They may look small but they pack a lot of kinetic energy. Imagine someone throwing one from a seafood truck, and hitting you in the chest at 30mph. Except that energy is telegraphed through a fly rod and line your holding. Not sure I'd use the word "tug"...

But yeah, that's a really fun fly rod size. You get the difficult-to-describe-grab, a few blistering runs well into your backing (keep fingers clear of handle!), and an almost enjoyable winch session at the rail. If I wanted to suffer a bit I'd try those with a 10wt... maybe... if I still had one. Also liking the pink and white flat-fall jig. Bet that thing did some damage today. "Pink, it's not just for humpies any more!"

Should have more deets tomorrow.

14776.jpeg

Damn, I love this boat...

14774.jpeg
 
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SilverFly

Active Member
Post meat pics and crickets... interesting. Maybe we're onto something here.

Again, if lack of fly fisher interest in this fishery has anything to do with aversion to, or disapproval of catch and kill, there's absolutely no reason we would have to fish that way. If 4 guys wanted to fly fish and do nothing but C&R, you're renting the boat, it's your choice.

My personal position is that, currently, this is a sustainable resource and I think sport caught fish are a much MUCH better utilization of said resource. There probably isn't a grocery store in the entire nation that doesn't have a few cans of Bumble Bee albacore, and likely several cases. Where do you guys think those thousands of metric tonnes of fish comes from? Yes, much of it from off our coast and further flung into the Pacific. Not that it matters since it's all basically the same stock.

So riddle me this, what would be the economic benefit "trail" to an albacore caught on a large commercial boat 200 miles of the Washington coast, canned in San Diego, and sold in a Kentucky Walmart? .... Obviously local caught processed and sold as a vastly higher quality product is the way to go. Even more so for sport dollars spent on hotels, restaurants and charters.

Interesting side story on that note. The guy that pioneered the current fresh-to-market (same DAY) trend on the famous "yellow boat" a.k.a the "Opportunaty" which is still running and kicking ass bringing fresh, HIGH VALUE albacore tuna to local markets and restaurants, STARTED AS A FLY FISHING CHARTER! Unfor-tuna-tely, an albacore fly charter that failed. Again, due to lack of clients, which might be partly my fault since I apparently suck at pitching this fishery. I fished on that boat several times and was on one of the last "sport commercial" trips before the Capt/fly fishing guide ditched town to South America, Mexico or Belize. I'm not making this shit up, nobody seems to know where he went. Not that it matters. The upside to the death of the charter operation, is the live bait tactics Capt Jad refined, with the goal of starting an amazing fly fishing charter, are now being used to develop the local fresh-to-market angle.

I guess my point is, whether or not you like to eat albacore, spending some fishing dollars on chasing them puts value on these incredible fish beyond ending up in a can on a Walmart shelf.

What I have in mind is a hybrid approach. Get a fly crew together, decide on how many fish we really want or need, and set a self-imposed boat limit. Then C&R everything else. What's wrong with that?
 
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jasmillo

Active Member
If I had to guess, there is not a lack of interest (CR or not), just a lack of people able to do it - especially on short notice. I would LOVE to do this. Unfortunately, I have already taken time off this month to fish coho and I am taking time off later this month to fish in Montana and I have a trip planned next month (with the wife so I stay out of divorce court:)). I also have colleagues in town next week so that will not work.

If I cannot make this work as a guy who theoretically (I can - but never do) take almost 50 days off a year due to my tenure with my company, have no kids and a pretty understanding wife, It is probably pretty tough for a lot of folks on the forum who have kids, less vacation time, etc.

I really, really want to do this. I just do not see how I can make it work this year unless you all somehow snag a weekend charter date while I am around while the weather is decent. Boo!
 

SilverFly

Active Member
If I had to guess, there is not a lack of interest (CR or not), just a lack of people able to do it - especially on short notice. I would LOVE to do this. Unfortunately, I have already taken time off this month to fish coho and I am taking time off later this month to fish in Montana and I have a trip planned next month (with the wife so I stay out of divorce court:)). I also have colleagues in town next week so that will not work.

If I cannot make this work as a guy who theoretically (I can - but never do) take almost 50 days off a year due to my tenure with my company, have no kids and a pretty understanding wife, It is probably pretty tough for a lot of folks on the forum who have kids, less vacation time, etc.

I really, really want to do this. I just do not see how I can make it work this year unless you all somehow snag a weekend charter date while I am around while the weather is decent. Boo!
And yet almost every single gear charter is fully booked. Some a year or more in advance. Yes, we are vastly outnumbered by gear fishermen but the main difference is they seem to be much more willing and aware of what a great fishery it is. Just say'n.

If advance planning is the issue, I'm totally down with looking at next year. Again, it takes a critical mass of fly clients to reserve these boats. Then let's get a list of people started and talking to each other about long range plans.
 
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plaegreid

Saved by the buoyancy of citrus
Post meat pics and crickets... interesting. Maybe we're onto something here.

Again, if lack of fly fisher interest in this fishery has anything to do with aversion to, or disapproval of catch and kill, there's absolutely no reason we would have to fish that way. If 4 guys wanted to fly fish and do nothing but C&R, you're renting the boat, it's your choice.

My personal position is that, currently, this is a sustainable resource and I think sport caught fish are a much MUCH better utilization of said resource. There probably isn't a grocery store in the entire nation that doesn't have a few cans of Bumble Bee albacore, and likely several cases. Where do you guys think those thousands of metric tonnes of fish comes from? Yes, much of it from off our coast and further flung into the Pacific. Not that it matters since it's all basically the same stock.

So riddle me this, what would be the economic benefit "trail" to an albacore caught on a large commercial boat 200 miles of the Washington coast, canned in San Diego, and sold in Kentucky Walmart? .... Obviously local caught processed and sold as a vastly higher quality product is the way to go. Even more so for sport dollars spent on hotels, restaurants and charters.

Interesting side story on that note. The guy that pioneered the current fresh-to-market (same DAY) trend on the famous "yellow boat" a.k.a the "Opportunaty" which is still running and kicking ass bringing fresh, HIGH VALUE albacore tuna to local markets and restaurants, STARTED AS A FLY FISHING CHARTER! Unfor-tuna-tely, an albacore fly charter that failed. Again, due to lack of clients, which might be partly my fault since I apparently suck at pitching this fishery. I fished on that boat several times and was on one of the last "sport commercial" trips before the Capt/fly fishing guide ditched town to South America, Mexico or Belize. I'm not making this shit up, nobody seems to know where he went. Not that it matters. The upside to the death of the charter operation, is the live bait tactics Capt Jad refined with the goal of starting an amazing fly fishing charter, are now being used to develop the local fresh-to-market angle.

I guess my point is, whether or not you like to eat albacore, spending some fishing dollars on chasing them puts value on these incredible fish beyond ending up in a can on a Walmart shelf.

What I have in mind is a hybrid approach. Get a fly crew together, decide on how many fish we really want or need, and set a self-imposed boat limit. Then C&R everything else. What's wrong with that?
Man, I'd love to fill a freezer with fly caught albies. That's the one problem with Wyoming: no salt. :(
 

jasmillo

Active Member
And yet almost every single gear charter is fully booked. Some a year or more in advance. Yes, we are vastly outnumbered by gear fishermen but the main difference is they seem to be much more willing and aware of what a great fishery it is. Just say'n.

If advance planning is the issue, I'm totally down with looking at next year. Again, it takes a critical mass of fly clients to reserve these boats. Then let's get a list of people started and talking to each other about long range plans.
Yeah, Outside of them outnumbering is, I think the other thing to consider is it is probably more comfortable for a gear guy to go from their normal everyday fishing to albacore fishing. I don’t know the actual numbers but I imagine a big majority of fly guys are really only comfortable fly fishing for smaller fish with lighter rods - like 6 weights and under. There might me an intimidation factor in going out with a 12 weight (which they probably do not own), casting it, etc.

That being said, I am no big game fisherman myself. The biggest fly rod I currently own is an 8 weight. I still really want to do this though!!

If you get a list started for next year, include me. Even if it does not happen it gives me a legitimate reason to start shopping for a new 12 weight :)!
 

Nick Clayton

Active Member
I happen to know a guy who will be running a tuna charter boat full time next year who is quite open to fly fishing ;)

FYI I had guys onboard today who brought a fly rod. They didn't fish it much as they were too busy piling fish onboard with live bait, 52 of them but who's counting.. But they did hook and land 3 on the fly. Could have done much more if they put more time into it
 

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