Fishing Report (Pic Heavy)

Brian Miller

Be vewy vewy qwiet, I'm hunting Cutthwoat Twout
It's been a pretty good summer so far. A buddy and I hiked in 2.5 miles to a stream we had gone to a month prior, and I had been to a week earlier with a mutual friend but my buddy had to work. The water level was a lot lower so we picked a high gradient section with boulders that had many plunge pools. The going was slow through the boulder garden so we only got to fish 0.4 river miles before we decided to call it a day due to decreasing daylight and a weather change. Even so my GPS recorded a 6.2 mile day.
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Here are just a few of the fish I landed with my 3.9 meter Tenkara rod and where I found them.
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longputt

Active Member
Nice report...when I got to the last picture I could feel my feet go numb and I had that sensation that I was stumbling. Wet wading cold water for me is a nothing but a controlled fall!
 

Brian Miller

Be vewy vewy qwiet, I'm hunting Cutthwoat Twout
I could feel my feet go numb and I had that sensation that I was stumbling. Wet wading cold water for me is a nothing but a controlled fall!
I have worn knee pads for several years when fly fishing rivers to protect my knees and waders when getting low for stealth (ala the "Curtis Creek Sneak"), and for kneeling when releasing a fish from the net.

First I used standard contractor hard shell knee pads (noisy & awkward-unstable when kneeling on rocks, won't stay put over the knees especially with breathable waders), then Rothco neoprene tactical knee and shin guards (more protection, stays put even over waders, but heavy and very stiff to hike & wade in).

But I recently purchased some padded neoprene Wader Knee and Shin Guards from Esoteric Tackle in the UK. They have a little less padding than the Rothcos but still provide adequate protection and comfort when kneeling on rocks, stay put very well (on the ACU trousers I wear wet wading), and are lighter and more flexible to hike and wade in. They also wrap all the way around the calf with trousers on so they provide a little warmth. When combined with wool socks, neoprene wading socks, and neoprene gravel guards, my legs haven't gotten cold at all.

Highly recommended!
 
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JACKspASS

Active Member
Great report! If you dont mind me asking......Did you see any sign of wolves, cougars, bears, or tweakers? If you did see sign, i would appreciate a general location so i can avoid this area forever, thanks.
 

Brian Miller

Be vewy vewy qwiet, I'm hunting Cutthwoat Twout
Did you see any sign of wolves, cougars, bears, or tweakers? If you did see sign, i would appreciate a general location so i can avoid this area forever, thanks.
I have seen a bear near the location in that report some years back. But no tweakers or grow sites that I would fear more.

95% + of my freshwater stream fishing is hiking in 3/4 mile or more to access a stream; often alone. 80% is hiking in 1.5 to 2.5 miles. Most are very rural or USFS Wilderness, far from public transportation or other services that the homeless rely on, which lessens the odds on tweakers.

A few years ago at one stream closer to a city I did walk through an abandoned homeless camp (that the county; not King, refreshingly had cleared out). I carried my 45 in a chest rig there a few times after that but thankfully I don't feel a need to carry there anymore, or anywhere else I fish (man that thing is heavy/bulky).

I've seen bears, bear scat, or heard reports of bears on several streams I fish but had no issues. I've heard reports of and undoubtedly I've been observed by cougars at places I fish but I feel pretty safe playing the odds there.

edit* After re-reading your question about wanting to avoid the location because of a potential bear encounter, the "general location" is

Screenshot_20190914-071027_US Topo Maps.jpg
:)
 
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SawyerJones

Active Member
This water and those fish sure look familiar. Fishing plunge pools and pockets amongst boulders is so fun. Did you find your tenkara lacking in reach at all, or were you able to reach out to all the pockets you wanted?
 

Brian Miller

Be vewy vewy qwiet, I'm hunting Cutthwoat Twout
This water and those fish sure look familiar.
wink wink ;)

Did you find your tenkara lacking in reach at all, or were you able to reach out to all the pockets you wanted?
Thanks for asking!

Sorry if this answer seems long-winded but Tenkara was developed by mountain villagers in Japan to feed their families and to sell their catch in the village market. It was first documented in the 17th century and was refined over nearly 400 years by generations of commercial fishermen to be a highly effective and efficient way to catch fish in mountain streams (translated "genryu") just like the one in the pictures. It only became a means of sport fishing in Japan during the 1960s.

I'm still a comparative beginner in the Tenkara "community" but during my first few months of fishing Tenkara gear and techniques I gradually became capable of making accurate fly-first casts out to ~18 feet ending in the classic "Tenkara Triangle" vertical tight line presentation with precise drifts using level fluorocarbon lines that are the length of my (11 ft or) 13 ft Tenkara "zoom rod". I have a (14.5, 16) 17.5 foot two handed "triple zoom rod" that can reach out to around 29 feet but I need more practice with it to get accurate fly-first casts with an unweighted fly. I also have a wonderful lightweight 8 ft or 10.5 ft full flex "zoom" rod for fishing smaller brushy creeks with low overhead cover that has been able to turn chunky 12" trout darting for snags and undercut banks in heavy current to land them.

A stealthy approach to within casting range requires some thought and care taking direction of current, wind, and available cover (for me) into account. It's a lot like hunting. In 2019 I began wearing a camo shirt, cap, and buff with pant waders, and when wet wading wearing ACU digital camo trousers to get even closer. It's basically using the "Curtis Creek Sneak", to get as close as I need to get to virtually any lie I can read.

I've logged 20 to 25 fish days on that stream with my 11-13 ft "zoom rod". So far I've seen no other anglers, footprints, snagged lures, bait cups, or other trash, and pray to God it stays that way as long as my body can take me there to fish it.
 
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SawyerJones

Active Member
wink wink ;)

Thanks for asking!
That sounds like a very fun way to fish. That bit of history behind it all is pretty neat.

I had no idea that there were rods that could reach out to 29 feet. I'm going to have to give it a try next summer. There were a few to many times this season where my stripped fly line tangled into brush at my feet in extra skinny water, or wrapped around logs, only for me to reach down to untangle it and in doing so putting my leader in the branches above me.

I like working in close with stealth on creeks also, I pretty much have to to maintain a dead drift. I'm thinking learning tenkara will make this kind of fishing more manageable for me. Thanks for the insights!
 

Brian Miller

Be vewy vewy qwiet, I'm hunting Cutthwoat Twout
Expert Tenkara anglers are using fluorocarbon level lines and (extruded) tapered mono lines that are 1.5x to 2x the length of their rods! Some are are using PVC coated floating lines to vastly extend their reach.
 

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