Spey Fishing Puget Sound Rivers in September for Salmon

tsuribaka

New Member
Hi,

I'll be making a trip out to Seattle in a couple of weeks. Used to live in East Renton HIghlands, but moved out of WA 4 years ago, sadly. When I lived there I used to fish the Green, Puyallup, Carbon, and occasionally the Snohomish system. But, I didn't do much fly fishing back then. Now I almost exclusively fly fish.

Would love to do some Spey fishing for Salmon on the Sky as I believe it will be open Sept 1-30. If it's not, can anyone suggest other places that are ideal for Spey fishing for Salmon in Puget Sound? I'm sure I'll try the Green as long as I can find a time or place where gear fisher aren't combat fishing.

I would greatly appreciate suggestions for fly patterns, colors, and sink tips as well, most likely for Coho and Pinks.

Thanks!
Cam
 

chadk

Be the guide...
In a couple of weeks, the humpies will be mush. Maybe a few zombies willing to bite, but I'd look for coho. Only thing you can legally target anyway (besides trout and steelhead). The Sky has been terrible for salmon in the last 10 years. Maybe look to the green, Puyallup, nisqually, Skagit, or some OP rivers?
 

tsuribaka

New Member
In a couple of weeks, the humpies will be mush. Maybe a few zombies willing to bite, but I'd look for coho. Only thing you can legally target anyway (besides trout and steelhead). The Sky has been terrible for salmon in the last 10 years. Maybe look to the green, Puyallup, nisqually, Skagit, or some OP rivers?
Thanks, Chadk! I'm definitely going to try the Green. In fact, I also plan to bring my 4wt single hand and target trout. Please let me know if you have any suggestions for that!
 

Shad

Active Member
The Sno/Sky should be good for silvers this year (IF predictions materialize). You will have company, but that's no different from anywhere else (where there are fish around, that is). Pink marabous and intruders (don't be afraid to jerk and twitch them as they swing) should get it done. Bring a spinning rod (with big hootchie spinners) for the times you get frustrated and really need a bite. Almost as much fun as a fly rod.
 

flybill

Purveyor of fine hackle, wine & cigars!
Drove up to Monroe this morning, and drove up to Sultan and down Ben Howard. The water looked good, but there weren't any people that I saw on the river, other than a boat launching at Lewis Street and some cars parked at Ben Howard. I thought the water might have been a little cloudy with the rain we had a few days ago, but it looked good.
 

Bentley

Active Member
Thanks, Chadk! I'm definitely going to try the Green. In fact, I also plan to bring my 4wt single hand and target trout. Please let me know if you have any suggestions for that!
Landing at SeaTac at end of this month for 2+ weeks to swing coastal rivers NW of there. Your a veteran to be bringing your 4 wt. SH rod to accompany steelhead & salmon gear. SRC are willing when you find them. All those little surface splashes are not always smolts. On a long leader, try a small black & white reverse spider and a orange belly caddis for surface action. For below surface fast seams and deeper water, go to a hot orange bead, peacock bodied wooly worm palmered with flame orange/brown hackle. Please pinch barb real well and gently release all. If you do not, may my Louisiana voodoo curse be upon you.
 

tsuribaka

New Member
Landing at SeaTac at end of this month for 2+ weeks to swing coastal rivers NW of there. Your a veteran to be bringing your 4 wt. SH rod to accompany steelhead & salmon gear. SRC are willing when you find them. All those little surface splashes are not always smolts. On a long leader, try a small black & white reverse spider and a orange belly caddis for surface action. For below surface fast seams and deeper water, go to a hot orange bead, peacock bodied wooly worm palmered with flame orange/brown hackle. Please pinch barb real well and gently release all. If you do not, may my Louisiana voodoo curse be upon you.
Thanks, Bentley! Appreciate the sincere advice. And, yes, I'll definitely be barbless!
 

tsuribaka

New Member
The Sno/Sky should be good for silvers this year (IF predictions materialize). You will have company, but that's no different from anywhere else (where there are fish around, that is). Pink marabous and intruders (don't be afraid to jerk and twitch them as they swing) should get it done. Bring a spinning rod (with big hootchie spinners) for the times you get frustrated and really need a bite. Almost as much fun as a fly rod.
Thanks, Shad! Any suggestions on sink tips?
 

Buzzy

Active Member
Thanks, Shad! Any suggestions on sink tips?
Hopefully Shad doesn't mind me adding my less than two cents worth - I have limited experience on coastal river coho fishing but the few times I've done it I a used clear intermediate tip (this was an experienced anglers suggestion). The water was very low and clear and only a few miles from tidewater so the fish were easily put down. Pink and combinations with purple seemed to be the preferred color. I suppose that changes day to day. Best of luck.
Pat
 

Shad

Active Member
Thanks, Shad! Any suggestions on sink tips?
Depends on depth and current (if your plan is to be down in the fish). I personally opt for a slightly lighter tip than what is required to bump the bottom, because bumping the bottom in a hole full of salmon is an all-too-effective means of achieving foul hookups, which are not what we're after.

I don't know the Sno/Sky at all; I don't fish there (too far from where I live), but I've seen and heard enough accounts to know they get decent numbers of coho in good years and that the coho there behave a lot like coho elsewhere (which is to say they can go from on fire to lockjawed in a second, or vice versa). If that's the case, biters will move (sometimes a good distance) to your fly, so you don't have to run it through the pod to catch them. Also, I've found fall fish not to be leader shy, so I wouldn't worry too much about being stealthy. 2-3 feet of 12-lb. Maxima off the end of your sink tip (or sinking poly leader, which I like a lot these days) should get bit fine.
 

Chucker

Chucking a dead parrot on a piece of string!
Depends on depth and current (if your plan is to be down in the fish). I personally opt for a slightly lighter tip than what is required to bump the bottom, because bumping the bottom in a hole full of salmon is an all-too-effective means of achieving foul hookups, which are not what we're after.

I don't know the Sno/Sky at all; I don't fish there (too far from where I live), but I've seen and heard enough accounts to know they get decent numbers of coho in good years and that the coho there behave a lot like coho elsewhere (which is to say they can go from on fire to lockjawed in a second, or vice versa). If that's the case, biters will move (sometimes a good distance) to your fly, so you don't have to run it through the pod to catch them. Also, I've found fall fish not to be leader shy, so I wouldn't worry too much about being stealthy. 2-3 feet of 12-lb. Maxima off the end of your sink tip (or sinking poly leader, which I like a lot these days) should get bit fine.
It really is true that the sno/sky coho are the most lockjawed fish in existence. There are lots of them some years though, so the fishing pressure is massive - which probably explains the lockjaw. This year there might not be so many.
 

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