Switch spey casting

zuzr

New Member
I know I'm going to catch flack for this one, but I got myself a secondhand orvis clearwater switch 8, which came spooled with hydros HD switch line. I took it to the park for some lawn casting and while spey casting worked well up to the 30ish' taper, I couldn't get a decent cast after that without going overhead. I've read the literature against switch rods and it sounds like it's a fairly common problem I was just wondering if I just totally suck at spey casting or if it is a failure of the line?

Bonus questions:
- what are shooting/mono tips?
- the loop and shooting head on the line are pretty beat up (halfway split where the tip meets line), can I snip it off and attach a new head or is it new line time?

Forgive my ignorance, I just got started 2mo ago. Thanks for reading!
 

zuzr

New Member
I'll have to check when I get back. I heard overweighting +2 is the move, is that what you would recommend?
 

TheAngler

Active Member
For my 8wt Sage X switch I use a 12wt Outbound Short line (~510 grains) on the beaches and about 550 grains OPST commando head for spey on the rivers.

For the beaches, I use a modified D-loop instead of a pure overhead cast. It allows me to cast all day when I need a break from the single-hand rod. Something like this. It may be ugly but it works for me.

The shorter OPST head and keeping the rod low helped make spey casting work on the river for me.

I spent a lot of time on this rod to get it right for "me". Mileage will vary. :)
 

Scandi Andy

Member
I know I'm going to catch flack for this one, but I got myself a secondhand orvis clearwater switch 8, which came spooled with hydros HD switch line. I took it to the park for some lawn casting and while spey casting worked well up to the 30ish' taper, I couldn't get a decent cast after that without going overhead. I've read the literature against switch rods and it sounds like it's a fairly common problem I was just wondering if I just totally suck at spey casting or if it is a failure of the line?

Bonus questions:
- what are shooting/mono tips?
- the loop and shooting head on the line are pretty beat up (halfway split where the tip meets line), can I snip it off and attach a new head or is it new line time?

Forgive my ignorance, I just got started 2mo ago. Thanks for reading!
That's actually a nice setup and should be great for any river with big fish :) When practicing spey casting though, find some water and work on establishing good technique first. Perhaps a local fly shop instructor ? Lawn casting a slick Hydros line would be tough to load the rod to form a proper D-loop. 11' switch rods are great casting tools when lined properly with good fundamentals. Go slow and pay attention to your bottom hand position and anchor point. Practice 2 casts. Snap C & Switch cast. Those will help identify the sweet spot on overhang & D loop formation. Many lines available now for switch rods, that are designed to load up the way you want. Also, take your line into any shop and they can weld on a new tip loop. It's fun learning for sure ...Go get em ...!
 

Old Man

Just an Old Man
I tried spey casting and fishing for a while. But it didn't take on me. When I was still in Washington I did the classes with the boys down on the river in Carnation and also in Fall City on the same river with Aaron and his boys. When the river was blown out we would practice in the park on the grass. We used what was called a grass leader. It wasn't the same as being on the water but it did let you load the rod so to speak. Now everybody say lawn casting sucks because they use a straight piece of leader and you can't load the rod on grass. What ever happened to the lawn leader?? I always thought it did a good job and allowed you to practice just about anyplace.
 

Shad

Active Member
Use water for your testing. That way, you increase your odds of hooking something while you're figuring things out significantly! Fish of 1,000 casts, they say, so you better not waste many casts on grass.
 

zuzr

New Member
Haha I agree with the logic but just got the rod and didnt have time to drive out to freshwater, just wanted to chuck it around. I've been watching Antti's spey casting videos and they're the best I've found, going out later today to work it out. Thanks for all the replies!
 

Jim Darden

Active Member
I know I'm going to catch flack for this one, but I got myself a secondhand orvis clearwater switch 8, which came spooled with hydros HD switch line. I took it to the park for some lawn casting and while spey casting worked well up to the 30ish' taper, I couldn't get a decent cast after that without going overhead. I've read the literature against switch rods and it sounds like it's a fairly common problem I was just wondering if I just totally suck at spey casting or if it is a failure of the line?

Bonus questions:
- what are shooting/mono tips?
- the loop and shooting head on the line are pretty beat up (halfway split where the tip meets line), can I snip it off and attach a new head or is it new line time?

Forgive my ignorance, I just got started 2mo ago. Thanks for reading!
Normally I wouldn't comment on this because I expect to get shouted down, but after years of experience with what folks call switch rods, I think you need to hear this......you can have a good overhand rod or a good spey rod or a rod that does both poorly, which some folks call a switch rod. I have an Orvis 11" that tosses a 390 grain head and is a dream to spey cast, you can overhead cast it but it ain't pretty.
bonus questions....1) never heard of shooting mono tips.....forget it.
2) re weld the loop.....if you don't know how to, cut it off and tie it to the running line.
 

zuzr

New Member
Yep that's the flack I was expecting. I'm a fan of the versatility, since I dont know most of the waters where I just moved and have never needed more than 60' of line out so I'm down to compromise for the time being.

Just found out the guy I bought it from put a 420 (noice) grain line on it so I'm going to get the wulff ambush #10 before my next trip to a big river.
 

dustinchromers

Active Member
Bear this in mind. I have many Spey and switch rods. I have probably near seventy plus lines to service them I've obtained over many years. I on average have about four lines per rod and yes there's a massive amount of crossover in lines that fit various rods. A catch all line is ok for everything, nothing more. However a switch is really effective when lined for a specific task. Your ambush ten is a good line and will do many things well. For swinging I highly suggest a short skagit like an opst or a scout by airflo. For skating a Scandinavian head is nice. You have a really good stick. That's a foundation to build from. Now over time you will acquire a many lines to maximise it's effective range in a variety of applications. Try some lines. I'd be keen to send you a few at a time and let you demo them and send them back when you're done. I'm sure other members have lines they wouldn't mind doing the same. Name what you're curious of and try them. A head system with something cheap like 40lb big game as a runner make trying lines as easy as changing shoes for different occasions. You need to ask yourself what fishing you do most often. Get that line system first. Then ask what type of fishing you want to do or explore. Get that next and so on. There literally is a perfect line for any task. We are living in exciting times of limitless choices that are good choices.
 
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kmac

Active Member
I spent a total of about 6 hours of practice spey casting on the river before I went out to try and actually catch some fish. Spey casting lessons are a good investment as it's too easy to settle into some bad habits if you're learning on your own.
 

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