WDFW Seeks Public Comment on Liberalizing Limits for Bass, Walleye, and Channel Catfish

Jim Ficklin

Genuine Montana Fossil
I saw an interesting paper, from a study funded by BPA, that said rainbow trout need to be removed from the Yakima and Naches drainages to protect Lamprey and Salmon!
That fits right in with the other "legislative experts' plans," all the while continuing to ignore "the elephant in the room."
 

jwg

Active Member
There has been more research recently showing high impacts of bass/walleye.
I don't have the original papers at the moment but here is some reporting


"
For 27 years, a bounty program on northern pikeminnows has paid anglers to remove thousands of fish in the Columbia and Snake rivers each year. Pikeminnows are a native species, but dams on the rivers gave them an unnatural advantage in gobbling up dazed salmon and steelhead smolts coming over the spillways.
“Research showed that big pikeminnows 1 to 6 pounds would line up in the moving water across the tailrace at McNary and nail smolts,” Hoffarth said.
Smallmouth bass and walleye weren’t as effective at eating smolts at the dams, but walleye and bass –notably the younger ones – take a lot of young chinook in the two-inch range as they hold in shoreline rocky areas, said Anthony Fritts, a department biologist who’s conducted research on smallmouth predation in the lower Yakima River.
The annual reduction of pikeminnows could possibly be creating a void that allows bass and walleye numbers to expand even further, both biologists say citing research by Oregon and independent fisheries contractors.
Studies found that nearly two-thirds of the tagged juvenile chinook produced in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia failed to survive past McNary Dam, the first dam they encountered on their seaward migration.
Researchers calculated that a 50 percent reduction in McNary Reservoir mortality would result in an increase of about 100,000 Hanford Reach fall chinook adults a year. These wild salmon are known as upriver brights.
The majority of the mortality of juvenile upriver brights between spawning areas and McNary Dam has been attributed to predation by native and non-native predator fishes, with a large share going down the gullets of smallmouth bass and walleye.

Based on assumptions from limited data, the researchers estimated that about 24 million juvenile upriver bright chinook produced in the Hanford Reach may be lost to predator fishes annually. That would be roughly 46 percent of the Reach’s fall chinook salmon presmolt population."
 

jwg

Active Member
My understanding is that if you only sample the larger bass you'll mostly find crayfish but in a smaller size range you'll find them full of smolts
J
 

longputt

Active Member
“Research showed that big pikeminnows 1 to 6 pounds would line up in the moving water across the tailrace at McNary and nail smolts,” Hoffarth said.

My father started working for Grant County PUD in about 1958, one of his first assignments was to see if they could selectively electro-fish pike minnow in the tail-race and forebay.
 
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David Dalan

69°19'15.35" N 18°44'22.74" E
There has been more research recently showing high impacts of bass/walleye.
I don't have the original papers at the moment but here is some reporting


"
For 27 years, a bounty program on northern pikeminnows has paid anglers to remove thousands of fish in the Columbia and Snake rivers each year. Pikeminnows are a native species, but dams on the rivers gave them an unnatural advantage in gobbling up dazed salmon and steelhead smolts coming over the spillways.
“Research showed that big pikeminnows 1 to 6 pounds would line up in the moving water across the tailrace at McNary and nail smolts,” Hoffarth said.
Smallmouth bass and walleye weren’t as effective at eating smolts at the dams, but walleye and bass –notably the younger ones – take a lot of young chinook in the two-inch range as they hold in shoreline rocky areas, said Anthony Fritts, a department biologist who’s conducted research on smallmouth predation in the lower Yakima River.
The annual reduction of pikeminnows could possibly be creating a void that allows bass and walleye numbers to expand even further, both biologists say citing research by Oregon and independent fisheries contractors.
Studies found that nearly two-thirds of the tagged juvenile chinook produced in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia failed to survive past McNary Dam, the first dam they encountered on their seaward migration.
Researchers calculated that a 50 percent reduction in McNary Reservoir mortality would result in an increase of about 100,000 Hanford Reach fall chinook adults a year. These wild salmon are known as upriver brights.
The majority of the mortality of juvenile upriver brights between spawning areas and McNary Dam has been attributed to predation by native and non-native predator fishes, with a large share going down the gullets of smallmouth bass and walleye.

Based on assumptions from limited data, the researchers estimated that about 24 million juvenile upriver bright chinook produced in the Hanford Reach may be lost to predator fishes annually. That would be roughly 46 percent of the Reach’s fall chinook salmon presmolt population."
Ditch Pickles (Smallies) are a goddam plague. Our crew is 100% kill on them. And the are tasty!
 

Teal101

Active Member
There has been more research recently showing high impacts of bass/walleye.
I don't have the original papers at the moment but here is some reporting


"
For 27 years, a bounty program on northern pikeminnows has paid anglers to remove thousands of fish in the Columbia and Snake rivers each year. Pikeminnows are a native species, but dams on the rivers gave them an unnatural advantage in gobbling up dazed salmon and steelhead smolts coming over the spillways.
“Research showed that big pikeminnows 1 to 6 pounds would line up in the moving water across the tailrace at McNary and nail smolts,” Hoffarth said.
Smallmouth bass and walleye weren’t as effective at eating smolts at the dams, but walleye and bass –notably the younger ones – take a lot of young chinook in the two-inch range as they hold in shoreline rocky areas, said Anthony Fritts, a department biologist who’s conducted research on smallmouth predation in the lower Yakima River.
The annual reduction of pikeminnows could possibly be creating a void that allows bass and walleye numbers to expand even further, both biologists say citing research by Oregon and independent fisheries contractors.
Studies found that nearly two-thirds of the tagged juvenile chinook produced in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia failed to survive past McNary Dam, the first dam they encountered on their seaward migration.
Researchers calculated that a 50 percent reduction in McNary Reservoir mortality would result in an increase of about 100,000 Hanford Reach fall chinook adults a year. These wild salmon are known as upriver brights.
The majority of the mortality of juvenile upriver brights between spawning areas and McNary Dam has been attributed to predation by native and non-native predator fishes, with a large share going down the gullets of smallmouth bass and walleye.

Based on assumptions from limited data, the researchers estimated that about 24 million juvenile upriver bright chinook produced in the Hanford Reach may be lost to predator fishes annually. That would be roughly 46 percent of the Reach’s fall chinook salmon presmolt population."
Sounds real scientific. They have a few select data points and made a wild assumption. I've read a few papers like this and if you read their cited literature it generally tells a less dramatic story.

Theres no denying the bass are a predator and do take a number of smolts, especially in the Columbia tributaries, but if you read the BPA and WDFW studies done on the mainstem Columbia smolt consumption numbers are negligible. I'd really like to see the study used for reference in this article.

How about we deal with the birds....
 

Steve Vaughn

Member
WFF Supporter
Sounds real scientific. They have a few select data points and made a wild assumption. I've read a few papers like this and if you read their cited literature it generally tells a less dramatic story.

Theres no denying the bass are a predator and do take a number of smolts, especially in the Columbia tributaries, but if you read the BPA and WDFW studies done on the mainstem Columbia smolt consumption numbers are negligible. I'd really like to see the study used for reference in this article.

How about we deal with the birds....
Agree, as soon as I saw "assumptions based on limited data" I quit reading.
 

Rob Allen

Active Member
Agree, as soon as I saw "assumptions based on limited data" I quit reading.


That's pretty much all of fisheries managment right there..




I must add, this is not entirely the fault of fisheries managers or fisheries science.
Especially the science. There are limited resources and they've always had to rely onnthe best available science. If they are to do anything at all they must make assumptions. It's not their fault those assumptions are often incorrect or incomplete they are simply trying to accomplish difficult tasks without all the data they need.
 
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