The Hobby Lobby fly pattern?

obiwankanobi

Active Member
In the most recent Northwest FlyFishing magazine there is an article on Dry Falls that references a fly called the Hobby Lobby? Anyone know what this is? In this same article there is also mention of a fly called a TDC and I'm not sure what that is either.
 

Buzzy

Active Member
Can't help with the Hobby Lobby but the TDC midge pattern was one of the first I tied and fished, here's a good link: http://flytyingnewandold.blogspot.com/2011/11/tdc-nymph.html (thanks @Norm Frechette!)

In thinking back, we were pretty unsophisticated tying midges like this but they worked very well. Impressionistic.

I traveled to the Basin in the fall of 1982 and spent a couple nights camped on the Lenice/Nunnally chain of lakes (hot spotting), the TDC was the first fly I fished in "Bobby". Don't forget your flashlight if you decide to fish late into the night.
 
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steve s

Active Member
Not sure about the Hobby Lobby fly but I believe that the TDC is The Deadly Chironomid. I took a fly tying class at Patrick's Fly Shop back in the mid '90s and that was one of the patterns that we learned. It is a simple pattern with a black body, silver rib and a white fluff for gills. We may have used ostrich herl for the gills but I don't exactly recall. I saw that same article and noticed they also showed a Nerges Nymph, another pattern that I learned in that fly tying class.
Good luck!
 

steve s

Active Member
Can't help with the Hobby Lobby but the TDC midge pattern was one of the first I tied and fished, here's a good link: http://flytyingnewandold.blogspot.com/2011/11/tdc-nymph.html

In thinking back, we were pretty unsophisticated tying midges like this but they worked very well. Impressionistic.
Yep, that's the pattern that I learned. It wasn't many years after that class that I saw an article in Flyfishing and Tying Journal that showed me how to tie some more detailed chironomids and hadn't thought about the TDC since.
Thanks for the link Buzzy!
 

Squamishpoacher

Active Member
Another chironomid of the early era was the PKCK which translated into the Powell Kilburn Chironomid Killer. Fly fisher, writer, founding member of the Totem Fly Fishers and mentor to many, Jim Killburn still resides in Qualicum Beach, BC.
 

Tom Bowden

Active Member
I heard about the TDC back in the early 1970's, but it wasn't until an encounter with Dr. Thompson on a lake in the mid-70's that I had success with it. He told me to retrieve it very slowly, just enough to keep slight tension on the line. The slow retrieve was the key. The PKCK was a great pattern too, and was tied in olive, brown, and different colors.

Since then, lots of new chironomid patterns have been developed, using flashy and translucent materials not available in the 60's and 70's. At some point in the 1980's, strike indicators became acceptable, popular, and effective. I use indicators all the time now, but held out and used Mr. Thompson's "naked" technique for many years.
 

Buzzy

Active Member
I heard about the TDC back in the early 1970's, but it wasn't until an encounter with Dr. Thompson on a lake in the mid-70's that I had success with it. He told me to retrieve it very slowly, just enough to keep slight tension on the line. The slow retrieve was the key. The PKCK was a great pattern too, and was tied in olive, brown, and different colors.

Since then, lots of new chironomid patterns have been developed, using flashy and translucent materials not available in the 60's and 70's. At some point in the 1980's, strike indicators became acceptable, popular, and effective. I use indicators all the time now, but held out and used Mr. Thompson's "naked" technique for many years.
Perhaps many of us should remember Dr. Thompson's fly and technique for fishing it. I know I get stuck in a rut sometimes......... good history, Tom!
 

Jim Darden

Active Member
Thanks for the correction Preston. I could have sworn that Jimmy called it "The Deadly Chironomid" but that was around 25 years ago.

Thanks
you are right, it was the Thompsons Deadly Chironomid. That one and the PKCK were the first published chironomid patterns.
 

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