Old Guide Wrap Epoxy ?

29guy

Member
Getting ready to build my first rod and did some test wraps on an old spinning rod. The thread wraps turned out fine , but not the low build 2 part epoxy! I tried the equal amount of the 2 part epoxy and it stayed sticky ( it's been a month now) . I have done a few more test wraps with ever increasing amounts of hardener. I am now at double the amount of hardener and after 72 hours at 65 degrees it is still tacky.

I believe the low build wrap epoxy is old. The company I purchased it from has great prices and all of the things I bought have hand written price tags on them and now I am thinking the stock might be years old. If the wrap epoxy is very old will it break down to such an extent that it will no longer cure appropriately and therefor stays sticky?

Your thoughts and experience would be greatly appreciated.
 

Mike Monsos

AKA flyman219
WFF Supporter
I tried low build epoxy for the first time on a repair I made. The first coat was like yours not cured, tacky to the touch. I tried again and ended up with the same problem after carefully measuring the two parts.

I finally figured out the issue, I was mixing for the required time but I was not SCRAPING the sides of my mixing cup to FULLY mix the entire two parts together. So my advice is to mix another batch and scrape the sides of the cup a lot as you mix your batch. If you add a correctly mixed coat on top and it cures correctly it will cover the tacky first coat.

Mike
 

Steve Kokita

FISHON206
If your two parts aren’t clear, I think old hardener gets yellow, it’s time to chuck them and get some new stuff. I really like Threadmaster over Flex Coat. It’s a real bummer taking your time with the wraps and the final step is the finish and it fails.... :mad:
 

Buzzy

Active Member
I recently wrapped a rod using low build two part epoxy. Thankfully I did two small test runs before coating the windings. I discovered the same thing @Mike Monsos did, I simply wasn't getting all of both components mixed. It was also critical to spend the extra time mixing, don't try to rush it.
 

Chucker

Chucking a dead parrot on a piece of string!
Cold, wet environment can also mess up epoxy curing. You doing this in a garage?

Increasing the amount of hardener will not actually make it cure any better. Stick with what it says on the label.

I have epoxy that is over 10 years old and it still cures just fine. It will go off eventually, but it takes a long time. I think that UV can affect how fast it goes off, I keep it in the dark.
 

Wyobee

Active Member
Yeah, only mix it at 50/50 ish, mix thoroughly, keep turning the rod every fifteen to thirty minutes till it starts setting up to prevent pooling, and I add black epoxy dye. Acetone, or similar high volatility sovlevent will probably remove the uncured epoxy and help dry what is cured.
 

29guy

Member
OK thanks for all the suggestions. I will try again (on test wraps) watching how I mix the 2 parts.

I am in my workshop that has a heater so heat/humidity should not be a problem.

I will repost my results early next week.

Thanks again to all!
 

Rob Allen

Active Member
Getting ready to build my first rod and did some test wraps on an old spinning rod. The thread wraps turned out fine , but not the low build 2 part epoxy! I tried the equal amount of the 2 part epoxy and it stayed sticky ( it's been a month now) . I have done a few more test wraps with ever increasing amounts of hardener. I am now at double the amount of hardener and after 72 hours at 65 degrees it is still tacky.

I believe the low build wrap epoxy is old. The company I purchased it from has great prices and all of the things I bought have hand written price tags on them and now I am thinking the stock might be years old. If the wrap epoxy is very old will it break down to such an extent that it will no longer cure appropriately and therefor stays sticky?

Your thoughts and experience would be greatly appreciated.

Use slightly more hardner than resin. We did this for years on thousands of rods.

No it doesn't cure better, just ensures that you never have a problem.
Also be sure to mix it for the full 2 minutes.
This is with flex coat.
 
I had the same thing happen to me several years ago and needed the rod right away for a trip. I coated the sticky resin with Sally Hansens and it did work and I am still using that rod with no issues. Surprised the hell out of me!
 

29guy

Member
OK, tried all suggestions. Added hardener, warmed the ingredients, stirred and stirred, increased room temperature. Still got tacky final product. I am guessing the epoxy is way past it’s use by date.

Buying fresh and will go again.

Thanks again to all for input.
 

herkileez

Active Member
WFF Supporter
I tried low build epoxy for the first time on a repair I made. The first coat was like yours not cured, tacky to the touch. I tried again and ended up with the same problem after carefully measuring the two parts.
I finally figured out the issue, I was mixing for the required time but I was not SCRAPING the sides of my mixing cup to FULLY mix the entire two parts together. So my advice is to mix another batch and scrape the sides of the cup a lot as you mix your batch. If you add a correctly mixed coat on top and it cures correctly it will cover the tacky first coat.Mike
Quite often the cause of epoxy staying tacky....very important to mix ALL the epoxy.
 

MotoBoat

Active Member
What type container are you using to stir epoxy and hardener? What are you using for a stir device? What is used in the way of a syringe to measure epoxy and resin?

Any single item used in the process having Silicone WILL cause this issue! Cups, stir sticks, syringe, or even thread. If for some reason thread wraps are cleaned with a solution other than Acetone, like using rubbing alcohol, epoxy with dry sticky.

I too have had a tacky issue on two occasions. One was from not taking the nessessary 2 - 3 minutes to carefully mix epoxy parts. I thought 1 minute would suffice.

Once that issue was solved. Many years later I tried various sewing thread for thread wraps. So many colors to choose from and locally obtained when another color is needed. But some threads have silicone on them too!

Oh, there was a third tacky time. When I cleaned first epoxy coat with rubbing alcohol and applied second coat of epoxy.......tacky second coat. Third coat fixed tacky second coat issue.

I have had epoxy sit so long between uses that it crystalized. Once heated to liquid state both parts can be properly measured, mixed and will dry clear and hard. Your epoxy may be the issue but not likely. This occured with Flex Coat Lite.
 
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Chucker

Chucking a dead parrot on a piece of string!
What type container are you using to stir epoxy and hardener? What are you using for a stir device? What is used in the way of a sryinge to measure epoxy and resin?

Any single item used in the process having Silicone WILL cause this issue! Cups, stir sticks, siringes, or even thread. If for some reason thread wraps are cleaned with a solution other than Acetone, like using rubbing alcohol, epoxy with dry sticky.
Yes. I hadn’t thought about that being the potential issue. Pretty much any medical syringe has silicone and will mess your epoxy right up!
 

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