New to area, have some questions.

Hello, I moved to the Everett area about 2 months ago and have finally gotten myself settled in. I've been noticing a TON of small rivers, sloughs, lakes, and marshes in the area, and have read that some of them are pretty good for fishing, particularly the Snohomish and it's tributaries, which is only about 5 minutes from my apartment, not to mention the Port of Everett and the Puget Sound I used to be an avid fisher in my preteen and teen years, and even dabbled in fly fishing (I even bought a tying kit). It's been AT LEAST a decade since I seriously put a line in the water, but with all this access I have now, I would really like to get back into it, specifically fly fishing.

Now for the questions: Is it too late in the season to start? There have been some cold days, but I have definitely seen some jumps and swirls in the Snohomish and Union Slough. If I get a kit now, will I have time to use it before it gets way too cold? Any general areas to start casting in? I know people don't want to give up their spots, but I don't even know where to begin, or where to avoid. What kind of rod, line, and flies work around here, and what fish should I be targeting? I've been interested in tenkara fishing for a while now, some of the smaller creeks seem like a good spot for that.

Any general advice or words of wisdom anyone is willing to bestow would be greatly appreciated
 
You can fish year round here. You just need to study the regs to make sure where you want to go is open. Off the beach is open year
round for cutthroat.
Thanks! I downloaded an app that gives me the regs on just about any body of water. It uses gps maps and you just click on the river/stream/lake that you're at and it pops up. Any tips on targeting then in particular?
 

Old Man

Just an Old Man
Why not just get a copy of the regs and read it through. A lot of the Skinny water closes on the last day of October. Some waters change from fly fishing to gear fishing in December. Most lakes are open year round. Lots of info in the regs as it is over 140 pages long. You really need a good lawyer to figure them out. I used to live in Washington, got tired of all the people there and moved to Montana. About 13 years ago. Much more quiet here.
 
Why not just get a copy of the regs and read it through. A lot of the Skinny water closes on the last day of October. Some waters change from fly fishing to gear fishing in December. Most lakes are open year round. Lots of info in the regs as it is over 140 pages long. You really need a good lawyer to figure them out. I used to live in Washington, got tired of all the people there and moved to Montana. About 13 years ago. Much more quiet here.
I'll do that. And use the app for quick referencing
 

2kayaker

Active Member
Assuming you'll be exploring the wet places on foot, I really enjoy the warmth and dryness that good waders with non slip ( a perjorative term) boots provide. Heck, the improved access and slopping around in the water while staying dry is great fun. With good fall fishing and rainy weather coming,,that's half your raingear.
 

dld

Active Member
I don't have much to add, except to say that the coldest temperatures you'll normally get here are much warmer than B-More. Conversely, the hottest temp's here are cooler than B-more.

I've really only fished lakes, but have done so March-November. Good waders, fleece-lined pants, wool base layer, easy to deal with. I usually don't really even use gloves, but that is probably a reflection of my growing-up in Montana.
 
Hi CCT-
If you are new here, you’re best bet is to join a local fly club. You will make great friendships, and your learning curve will be reduced significantly. Invaluable. Good luck, and tight lines.
 

Stonefish

Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater....Know Grizzler
You might consider visiting a local shop to look at gear.
The Avid Angler is in Lake Forest Part and Pacific Fly Fishers is in Mill Creek. Both are good shops and have excellent staff members.
They also offer casting lessons.

Think of cold and lousy weather as your allies.
It eliminates a lot of fair weather angling competition and the fish don't mind.
SF
 

Old Man

Just an Old Man
There is a park up by the sewer ponds, that has a path that worms a round it. There is no wading in the lower river and sloughs as they are to deep. That area is just a boat show. You will have to get you a good map and learn to fish the streams that come out of the mountains.

There is the Skykomish river, the Stillaguamish, The Skagit. These are just the "S" rivers. These are by no means sacred rivers. Those places you will have to find by your lonesome. But all it takes is a little exploring and burning up gas to find your secret places.
 

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