OMG

roadglideguy

Active Member
Was wondering... what weight of rod would everyone want to be using for big Springs 25 to 35 pounds? Hooked into a 30 pound plus Spring on my 8 weight and was relieved when it snapped my tippet before my rod (not sure if it would have but!!!)...I landed a beautiful silver 17 pound Coho on my eight weight, what a rush!
 

Rob Allen

Active Member
Was wondering... what weight of rod would everyone want to be using for big Springs 25 to 35 pounds? Hooked into a 30 pound plus Spring on my 8 weight and was relieved when it snapped my tippet before my rod (not sure if it would have but!!!)...I landed a beautiful silver 17 pound Coho on my eight weight, what a rush!
Stout 9 or a 10
 

Old Man

Just an Old Man
If your drag was a little looser you might have landed the big king. I hooked up with a very big Chum with my 5wt. The rod was bent almost double. But it didn't break. Got the fish close to shore and the fly fell out of its mouth. I was fishing for something different at that time. Talk about a rush.
 

Salmo_g

Well-Known Member
A 9 TH or 10 10 SH would be more comfortable with a Chinook that size. They pull hard. An 8 wt most likely isn't the reason for not landing the fish, although it would be difficult if it was a SH rod.
 

roadglideguy

Active Member
I also worry about the damage to the fish from the extended fight on a lighter weight rod. More likely in warmer waters. It is a form of exertional rhabdomylosis and/or hypokalemia (muscle damage and low potassium) caused by high levels of lactic acid (anarobic respiration/ muscle ischemia) from a prolonged fight... we as fisherpeople may have a great time fighting the fish for a longer period of time and it may appear to"revive" but it is probably going to die within a day or two secondary to this condition and kidney failure/acidosis.
 

_WW_

Geriatric Skagit Swinger
I also worry about the damage to the fish from the extended fight on a lighter weight rod. More likely in warmer waters. It is a form of exertional rhabdomylosis and/or hypokalemia (muscle damage and low potassium) caused by high levels of lactic acid (anarobic respiration/ muscle ischemia) from a prolonged fight... we as fisherpeople may have a great time fighting the fish for a longer period of time and it may appear to"revive" but it is probably going to die within a day or two secondary to this condition and kidney failure/acidosis.
That can happen with any rod. Best to just stay home.
 

SilverFly

Active Member
At least a 10wt. Especially for bright springers. Many years ago I hooked one on a ten, drifting a weighted bugger on a floating line in the chute at the head of a large pool.

It had rained the night before so this was likely a fresh, migrating fish. Felt the grab, set the hook and the head shakes made that 10wt buckle like a 4wt tied to a steelhead. No idea on weight but I'm comfortable saying it was well over 20. I saw a deep-bodied, yard-long flash before it shot upriver through the rapids above, with my backing melting away. Slowing it wasn't possible in spite of the whitewater it was swimming against. I started chasing upriver but didn't take long for the water drag and my palming the spool to snap the tippet.

That fish holds a permanent spot on my top 10 most memorable big ones that got away list. Moral of the story is don't screw around with an 8wt, or possibly even a ten if you're after spring chinook.
 
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Jakob B

Active Member
I only gear fish for them, my landing ratio is terrible with terminal tackle so I've never tried fly fishing for them.

Jakob
 

SilverFly

Active Member
I only gear fish for them, my landing ratio is terrible with terminal tackle so I've never tried fly fishing for them.

Jakob
The ironic thing is that flies sometimes work better for springers than conventional gear, even bait. Especially when they've been in the river a while and have been hammered hard. The toughest part with fly fishing is (1) finding a place where you can fly fish without too much company, and (2) getting the fly in the zone in the places you can. A hybrid approach that has worked very well for me in the past is to drift flies on casting gear. I've gotten some funny looks from the egg and shrimp boys with a #6 pale orange bugger tied to an otherwise normal drift rig on a heavy casting rod. I can remember the funny looks changing to shock. About 20 years ago limits on the Clackamas river allowed 2 hatchery chinook and a bonus steelhead. One day I got two springers drifting buggers on casting gear, and a steelhead on the 8wt. I walked off the river with over 50#'s of fish. Doubt that will ever happen again.
 
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Skip Enge

Uck Uck Uck, bitches
I got a 10 weight Loomis...I had experienced 30 plus lb fish on a 7...1.5 hours, dead arms...etc...you learn...you need a rod with a backbone in addition to your own...I have called for chiropractor appts for fishing "injuries"...but it has been a while...I miss that, but then I am edging into the age of wussiness...
 

SilverFly

Active Member
I've posted this one before but here's a small springer I swung up back in 2005. It passed up a larger/heavier conehead pattern to take the #8 unweighted black and orange bugger I had as a trailer. Don't be afraid to go small with chinook.

 
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