Dying mop material

Bonsai

Jerry
I have some white mop material (bathroom Rug). I would like to die it to a light tan and or an very light grey. I have heard about using tea or coffee but am concerned about the smell of the coffee or tea and the permeance of the color. Any recommendations as to what die should be used. Will mop material hold the die?
 

rawalker

Active Member
walnuts?
I have read KoolAid only really works with natural animal hair/fur or feathers, not man-made fibers your rug is likely made of.
Try Rit dyes?
Your rug is probably big enough to try several small patches and see which of the suggestions works to give you what you want.
 

DenWor54

Active Member
There used to be a place in the u-district called weavingworks that had a nice selection of fiber dyes. I played around with a SLF dubbing substitute back in the early 90’s but never really got it dyled in. It’s been so long that I don’t remember the acid that activated the dye. I will look around and see if I can find my dying stuff, also in the book Tying the Classic Atlantic Salmon Fly by micheal radencich has a chapter on dying fly tying materials by Wm t Roubal will answer some of your questions.
 

Ron McNeal

Life's good!
An infusion of fermented banana skins and dried wild blackberries will produce wonderfully structured tannins, both supple and pliable, that hold up well when added to a very lightly vinegared dye bath base. Slowly steeped in this bold and complex mélange, the resulting smokey ecrued greys vary by fabric composition. Antron nylon is the preferred fiber when aiming for more subtle tans and greys; experiment with other fibers. Post dye bath mountain water rinses ensure color integrity. Slight hints of scorched oak seem to attract larger fish. Do not attempt this at home - visit your local laundromat.
 

Professor

New Member
I have some white mop material (bathroom Rug). I would like to die it to a light tan and or an very light grey. I have heard about using tea or coffee but am concerned about the smell of the coffee or tea and the permeance of the color. Any recommendations as to what die should be used. Will mop material hold the die?
RIT Dyemore , not regular RIT, is specifically for synthetics like MOP material. I've used it on white MOP material to get many resultant colors. Check the RIT site for color formulas.
 

Mark Mercer

Member
An infusion of fermented banana skins and dried wild blackberries will produce wonderfully structured tannins, both supple and pliable, that hold up well when added to a very lightly vinegared dye bath base. Slowly steeped in this bold and complex mélange, the resulting smokey ecrued greys vary by fabric composition. Antron nylon is the preferred fiber when aiming for more subtle tans and greys; experiment with other fibers. Post dye bath mountain water rinses ensure color integrity. Slight hints of scorched oak seem to attract larger fish. Do not attempt this at home - visit your local laundromat.
Love it Ron !
 

Squamishpoacher

Active Member
I have tried crushed walnuts and onion skins. It took about two years of collecting walnut shells and over that hoarding onion skins to get enough raw material and I was not overly impressed with the results of either. There's lots of inexpensive dyes available which give better results.
 

Tacoma Red

Active Member
There are many types of mushrooms that are used to dye natural fabrics many colors, not just earthy tones but also bright colors. I'm not knowledgeable about which species of mushrooms to use but I'm sure that information is online. Good luck and let us know what happens.
 

Bonsai

Jerry
If I remember the 60s well enough, if I smoke enough banana skins and mushrooms and rub the black berries all over my body I won’t care about what color the mop material is. Mark has it right, somebody has to love Ron. If I ever tried to do any of this at home I am sure my wife wouldn’t love me any more. I am already pushing that envelope. I think I will stick with RIT dyes. Some guys?
 

Tim Cottage

Formerly tbc1415
The lichen that grows on alder trees produces a really nice light to medium tan depending on concentration and time in the dye pot. My wife uses it all the time for a variety if fibers. Natural dyes will reliability produce natural buggy colors.
 

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