you all talked me into trying Lone this weekend

Smalma

Active Member
After more than 35 year gap in my lowland lake trout fishing in Washington the last couple years I have fished both Lone and Pass fairly regularly (20 to 30 combined trips annually). Both lakes are about the same size and thanks to being shallow bowl lakes, located in the Olympic rain shadow, and being part of small drainage area they both are among the most productive western Washington trout waters capable of growing some pretty nice fish. The differences I see in the two fisheries is driven largely by differences in management approaches as result of the individual lake circumstances.

Historically Pass has been supported by spring plants of rainbow fry (3 inch fish) and fall plants of brown (5 inches or so). In the last few years in response to angler concerns about the declining condition and top end size of the rainbows WDFW reduced the planting levels which produce the expected results - reduce overall abundance, improved condition and more larger rainbows. The up side of the planting fry origin fish is that the next season as yearling fish in lakes like Pass/Lone they are several inches longer than typical hatchery reared catchables (similar age). The downside is reduced survival to fishery entry as compared to catchable releases. The brown plant is roughly 1/3 of the annual trout plant but the resulting fish contribute to fishery at a much lower rate than rainbows (behavior and catchable may contribute to that difference).

For the last few decades the Lone lake trout fishery has been supported by annual plants of catchable or larger fish.

My own fishing pretty much reflect the above differences in management. To honest both lakes kick my butt more often than I care to admit but on occasion have produce some stellar days for me. Generally speaking on both waters I'm catching acceptable sized fish that are well conditioned and given good accounts of themselves once I mange to hook one. My typically expectation on any given trip is for Pass to produce a lower catch rate (fewer fish) and slightly larger average size than what I find on Lone.

Our discussion also need to recognize that both lakes are very much in a state of flux and the fisheries of both are likely to change dramatically. With an expanding warm water species abundances in Pass (perch and sunfish) we can expect to see declining survival rates of fry origin plants and potentially lower growth rates. On Lone as the grass carp are aging out we will see increasing weed beds which can be expected to be very much a two edged sword. Increased weed beds will increase the diversity and potential biomass of organisms key to trout (and other species) diet. On the flip side we are seeing increase water clarity (a couple weeks ago it was at 3.5 meter - 11.5 feet); we can expect those weeds to grow to the depth of sunlight penetration.. Over time we can expect much of the Lone lake bottom to be covered with weeds; some of which will reach the surface. In addition what is rarely talked about such weed beds will increase the portion of the lake that provides preferred largemouth bass habitat.

I'm not near smart enough to predict with certainty what the final outcome will be from these changes but changes will occur and our fisheries will be affected. For those us that enjoy these fisheries and would advocate for the continuation of the fisheries I feel strongly that we need to both recognize that changes will occur and discuss among ourselves what our priorities in those fisheries are. This is doubly important given the limited resources WDFW has committed to western Washington low land trout fisheries.

Curt
 

bchapman

Active Member
Great comments!

On Lone as the grass carp are aging out we will see increasing weed beds
This prompted me to google up a bit about the longevity of grass carp...

From Wikipedia (and supported by some other published info): "According to one study, they live an average of five to 9 years, with the oldest surviving 11 years. In Silver Lake Washington there is a thriving population of grass carp passing the 15-year mark. They eat up to three times their own body weight daily."

More than you'd ever want to know about grass carp:
http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/creatures/BENEFICIAL/MISC/Ctenopharyngodon_idella.htm
 
Last edited:

PooterTooter

Active Member
If it was fishing decent in Nov, is there any hope its still fishing well? I'm getting itchy to fish and no other spot close seems to be fishable right now.
 

Jeff Dodd

Active Member
If it was fishing decent in Nov, is there any hope its still fishing well? I'm getting itchy to fish and no other spot close seems to be fishable right now.
I expect both Lone to be fishing about average for January, kinda slow but nice bright fish. If you fish a slow line deep, you’ll find a few fish.

This time of year on Lone Lake I like to fish a bright chartreuse leach pattern on a fast sinking line. Also try white bunny leeches, blood worms in the shallows,olive green leeches
 

PooterTooter

Active Member
I expect both Lone to be fishing about average for January, kinda slow but nice bright fish. If you fish a slow line deep, you’ll find a few fish.

This time of year on Lone Lake I like to fish a bright chartreuse leach pattern on a fast sinking line. Also try white bunny leeches, blood worms in the shallows,olive green leeches
appreciate the advice!
 

Kfish

Active Member
WFF Supporter
If it was fishing decent in Nov, is there any hope its still fishing well? I'm getting itchy to fish and no other spot close seems to be fishable right now.
I fished it today, high wind and all, heck of a legs workout :)
Several tugs but my bead head jig fly was too small to hook up with them, landed 1. I was the only crazy fool out on the water today.
IMG_20200129_112415.jpg
 

Support WFF | Remove the Ads

Support WFF by upgrading your account. Site supporters benefits include no ads and access to some additional features, few now, more in the works. Info

Latest posts

Top