NFR Nov 7th 1940

Gadabout_Trout

Active Member
My son has been watching a bunch of shows on bridge failures in the last week, and I thought that one of them would have covered Galloping Gertie - but none did. Thanks for the link - he'll be interested to watch it.
 

Salmo_g

Well-Known Member
It amazes me how much movement it took to break apart the bridge. I wonder if there was a lot of bridge movement during windy conditions while it was under construction.
 

SilverFly

Active Member
The all time best example of resonant frequency in a physical object, and why it needs to be accounted for in engineering.

What people may not know is that the original Tacoma Narrows bridge was a disguised WDFW program to enhance lingcod habitat in the Sound. Actually one of their more cost effective and successful projects. ;)
 

Stonefish

Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater....Know Grizzler
The all time best example of resonant frequency in a physical object, and why it needs to be accounted for in engineering.

What people may not know is that the original Tacoma Narrows bridge was a disguised WDFW program to enhance lingcod habitat in the Sound. Actually one of their more cost effective and successful projects. ;)
I always thought they should have sunk the pontoons from the old 520 bridge for artificial reefs in Puget Sound..
They would have made excellent bottomfish habitat structure.
SF
 

Buzzy

Active Member
My grandfather was living in Taylor, BC in the mid 1950’s. On one if his visits to our home in Agnew he bribed a Canadian Pacific RR bridge guard and drove his Pontiac across the RR trestle. The suspension bridge over the Peace River had collapsed. If family legend is accurate, he saved a couple hundred miles on the trip. Unlike Galloping Gertie, the Peace River bridge failure wasn’t because of “w”.
 

East Coaster

Active Member
Saw the original clip in high school physics class. Living in RI, and not having done much travel, the actual location didn't really register, though the name "Tacoma Narrows" somehow stuck in my memory. Many years later, on my first trip to the Seattle area, my wife and I were just about to cross the present bridge when I made the connection. Not being a fan of heights anyway, I spent the whole drive across trying:
1. to keep my eyes straight ahead
2. to avoid the thought that the road was going to undulate my car over the edge

Some memories are better left repressed....... :)
 
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Old Man

Just an Old Man
Saw the original clip in high school physics class. Living in RI, and not having done much travel, the actual location didn't really register, though the name "Tacoma Narrows" somehow stuck in my memory. Many years later, on my first trip to the Seattle area, my wife and I were just about to cross the present bridge when I made the connection. Not being a fan of heights anyway, I spent the whole drive across trying:
1. to keep my eyes straight ahead
2. to avoid the thought that the road was going to undulate my car over the edge

Some memories are better left repressed....... :)
I'm the same way. I can't stand high bridges. Even if they are cement. You ought to see me drive over a few of the passes here in Montana. And that Memorial bridge in Idaho. I have to stop before I cross it to gather up my courage to drive across it. It gets me to shaking.
 

GeorgeV

Active Member
I'm the same way. I can't stand high bridges. Even if they are cement. You ought to see me drive over a few of the passes here in Montana. And that Memorial bridge in Idaho. I have to stop before I cross it to gather up my courage to drive across it. It gets me to shaking.
Have you been over Bear Tooth Pass (elev.10947 ft) south of Red Lodge?
 

Old Man

Just an Old Man
Have you been over Bear Tooth Pass (elev.10947 ft) south of Red Lodge?
NO!!! I'll never. The last time I rode over that Deception Pass bridge. I shut my eyes. There is no way I could do it with my eyes open. The last time I came back to Washington. I came over Stevens pass. I did it on the inside lane. My problems don't happen unless I'm going down hill. Going up is no problem.
 
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