You won’t believe where it came from

Merle

Not New, Just rarely post...
Is there an easy way to tell if it's a westslope cutt versus an SRC? I've caught cutts years ago in the Green and wondered if they were sea runs or westies that dropped down from above.
 

bhudda

heffe'
Is there an easy way to tell if it's a westslope cutt versus an SRC? I've caught cutts years ago in the Green and wondered if they were sea runs or westies that dropped down from above.
Westies have heavy spots toward the tail and a few thru the upper body and SRC have spotting thru out the upper and lower body.. I’m sure someone has a more “ correct “ explanation..
 

Merle

Not New, Just rarely post...
Westies have heavy spots toward the tail and a few thru the upper body and SRC have spotting thru out the upper and lower body.. I’m sure someone has a more “ correct “ explanation..
Thanks, that actually helps a lot. -andy
 

Creatch'r

Heavies...
How often do you see those two species in the same net! Wow!
Never seen it west of the cascades but have on the East side! Was actually really cool moment as we floated by the first nice bank slot of the day my cousin and I both cast at the same log and immediately both had a fish chasing our streamers, they ate at about the same moment and both hit the net at the same time. Was definitely surprised at the westy, was a first on that float and actually a really nice fish, the bull trout just overshadowed it a bit.
 

Ian Horning

Powerbait Entomologist
I'm part of the Skykomish Brook Trout club but haven't got a Westslope there yet. I've got 'em in lakes that drain into the sky though.
 

Preston Singletary

Active Member
Seems to be some confusion in nomenclature in some of these posts. The "westslope" in the westslope cutthroat's common name refers to the west slope of the Rocky Mts. ; with the exception of a few outliers on the eastern slope of the Cascade Mts., its native range. The native cutthroat of the western slope of the Cascades is the coastal cutthroat ; which may or may not be a sea-run cutthroat, depending on whether it has, or was in a location from which it could migrate to saltwater (there are resident populations of coastal cutthroat). Extensive stocking of westslope cutthroat in westside Cascade mountain lakes has led to occasional establishment of resident populations in some westward flowing streams.
 

chromie

Active Member
You mean bull trout?
Aware of bull trout vs dolly. In the old days, dolly was the term used. I guess old habits die hard.

In RE to Preston: agree. Coastal and Westslope cutthroat are commonly misidentified.

With that said, coastal and westslope cutthroat exist in the three main northern puget sound streams (Skagit, Stilly,Sky) although most of the westlope cutthroat I have encountered have been on the Skagit, with catch timing centered around chum runs.
 

Preston Singletary

Active Member
The bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) was, for many years, considered to be a Dolly Varden (S. malma). In fact, that common name was originally applied to anadromous bull trout of California's McCloud River (which were quickly extirpated after construction of Shasta Dam). in 1978, Dan Cavender, of Ohio State University carried out an intensive study of existing specimens that showed that they were, indeed, different species. Dolly Varden do occur in Washington state, but only in high elevation tributaries in the Cascade and and Olympic mountains, where they never achieve significant size. The large, anadromous char of Puget Sound and the coastal rivers are bull trout. The closes genetic relative of the bull trout is the white-spotted char (S. leucomainis ), an Asian species.

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