Another Atlantic Salmon ID

cabezon

Sculpin Enterprises
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SilverFly

Active Member
O.K., I think that I got it. It is the body of a pelagic snail, probably Carinaria cristata (see https://www.mindenpictures.com/search/preview/glassy-nautilus-carinaria-cristata-san-diego-california/0_00445268.html). That blueish-conical thing is the shell. The clear body is part of the foot and visceral mass. The narrow arrowshaped object embedded in the jelly-like mass in the second picture is the digestive tract. Damn!!!

Steve
Great sleuthing Steve. So WTF? it's a mollusc trying to imitate a fish?
 

cabezon

Sculpin Enterprises
Great sleuthing Steve. So WTF? it's a mollusc trying to imitate a fish?
Hi Silverfly,
I don't know much about them. They must have a thin shell. An alternative name for the group is the glassy nautilus; their shells were highly prized for their rarity. The body must be close to neutrally bouyant. The foot is flattened and modified into a flat paddle for locomotion. They are predatory, primarily on gelatinous zooplankson likes salps and thaliaceans (see https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF00389157). Here is a nice video of the Mediterranean species in the field:
. I suspect that these dead individuals were brought up the coast during the warm water of summer and early fall and died / were rendered moribund by the cooler water. They are eaten by tuna... [Might be a challenge to create a fly with that kind of action...]

Steve
 
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SilverFly

Active Member
So bizarre. Wouldn't even begin to try tying an imitation of that. You think you know what's in the ocean and something like this turns up. Almost looks like some of the weird shit from the Cambrian period. What's next to wash up, trilobites, or maybe anomalocaris?
 

cabezon

Sculpin Enterprises
So bizarre. Wouldn't even begin to try tying an imitation of that. You think you know what's in the ocean and something like this turns up. Almost looks like some of the weird shit from the Cambrian period. What's next to wash up, trilobites, or maybe anomalocaris?
If anomalocaris were still alive, I would be much more careful when diving. Similarly, if Humboldt squid foraged inshore, divers would have a lot more to worry about (see
). But you are exactly right about strange marine creatures that appear from time to time where you least expect them. That's one reason why I want to go snorkeling while we're on a tuna trip this coming summer. I'm sure that I'll see something cool... [or you'll have some cool video of something making me into its lunch, like a big-ass mako shark...]
Steve
 
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Jeremy Floyd

Veðrfölnir
An acquaintance of mine was on the coast this weekend and found several of these on the beach, any ideas?

My first thought was jelly, but there are eyes and fins. Another thought I had was dogfish, but I could find no proof of that theory. Lastly, I figured it was an Atlantic Salmon. I’m figuring my last guess is most likely the case.

View attachment 218766
I believe that’s actually “seaborne miggs” A la silence of the lambs..
 

SilverFly

Active Member
That's one reason why I want to go snorkeling while we're on a tuna trip this coming summer. I'm sure that I'll see something cool... [or you'll have some cool video of something making me into its lunch, like a big-ass mako shark...]
Steve
You wouldn't say that if you were on the first tuna trip I had this year. It was a bluesharkapalooza out there. Three times the numbers, and not just usual three to five footers. I'd guess the median length around 5' with several pushing 8'. Toss in a not-unlikely chance of mako's (like the big one you guys saw jump), and no way I'd be getting in the water out there. Some kind of selfie-stick with a waterproof camera would be great though.

And no way I'd get in the water with Humboldt squid!
 

cabezon

Sculpin Enterprises
You wouldn't say that if you were on the first tuna trip I had this year. It was a bluesharkapalooza out there. Three times the numbers, and not just usual three to five footers. I'd guess the median length around 5' with several pushing 8'. Toss in a not-unlikely chance of mako's (like the big one you guys saw jump), and no way I'd be getting in the water out there. Some kind of selfie-stick with a waterproof camera would be great though.

And no way I'd get in the water with Humboldt squid!
I'm happy to take chances, but not too crazy a chance - fine line... I have attached a picture that I took of one of about 30-40 5-7' gray reef sharks that were at a feeding frenzy that our live-aboard stimulated off Osprey Reef, east of the Great Barrier Reef.
GrayReefShark1365D18Sm.jpg
Those guys diving with the Humboldt's were wearing chain-mail armor. Of course, it would suck if one of those aggressive squid bit through one's air line....
Steve
 
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