Trip Report The Lowcountry

Matt B

...
WFF Supporter
I got to do some inshore saltwater fishing with Pops while visiting for the holiday. Trout fishing was good before the big tide change. We also found a spot with some reds, and rounded out the day with some black drum and sand trout. I also snagged a good sized mullet in the tail which was surprising. I used a borrowed 9’ 8 wt St. Croix Legend Elite with a floating line. I think I like my old Lefty Kreh TFO Pro better. The TFO seems more powerful—definitely faster.

The fishing and sunshine at this time of year were a real treat for this Northwesterner. It was also interesting to imagine figuring this fishery out. The productive spots seemed similar to so many others—a big seemingly endless sea of grass and channels. The guide liked my casting, which is always a good thing (and nice to hear). He told me to come back and he had some spots to take me to. I hope I can some day! A5959EEF-A756-46F9-9038-A65F4B54ECFE.jpeg 29D608E1-9C9F-4BD9-B7AA-DA7603FF8524.jpeg 221C7A6B-E788-441F-A58D-4D628487ED69.jpeg
6C43F583-61C3-4CCB-AB44-87DFF1605681.jpeg ABF192EB-EFA3-48BD-BA73-C95745969411.jpeg
 

SilverFly

Active Member
I got to do some inshore saltwater fishing with Pops while visiting for the holiday. Trout fishing was good before the big tide change. We also found a spot with some reds, and rounded out the day with some black drum and sand trout. I also snagged a good sized mullet in the tail which was surprising. I used a borrowed 9’ 8 wt St. Croix Legend Elite with a floating line. I think I like my old Lefty Kreh TFO Pro better. The TFO seems more powerful—definitely faster.

The fishing and sunshine at this time of year were a real treat for this Northwesterner. It was also interesting to imagine figuring this fishery out. The productive spots seemed similar to so many others—a big seemingly endless sea of grass and channels. The guide liked my casting, which is always a good thing (and nice to hear). He told me to come back and he had some spots to take me to. I hope I can some day! View attachment 218784 View attachment 218785 View attachment 218786
View attachment 218788 View attachment 218789
Great report buddy. Glad you're getting out on some amazing trips this year. Days on the water like that with your Dad are priceless. I am a bit concerned about the amorphous black blob on your face though ;).
 
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Jim Darden

Active Member
Great report, what part of Washington are you from, your profile doesn't say.....don't give away any secret stuff, like your state....
 

Matt B

...
WFF Supporter
Great report, what part of Washington are you from, your profile doesn't say.....don't give away any secret stuff, like your state....
I’m not sure how that information adds to the post, and I find your facetious tone perplexing given that my personal information is my concern, and any enjoyment or anxiety you gleaned from my post cost you exactly $0.00, but since 2004 I have lived in the beautiful and highly populated Puget Sound region of Washington State.
 

Buzzy

Active Member
WFF Supporter
@Matt B - Now that it is about 24°F outside I've been thinking how nice it would be to go fishing where it is warmer. Thanks for sharing and the redacted picture cracked me up.

btw the ignore button is your friend.
 

Jim Darden

Active Member
I’m not sure how that information adds to the post, and I find your facetious tone perplexing given that my personal information is my concern, and any enjoyment or anxiety you gleaned from my post cost you exactly $0.00, but since 2004 I have lived in the beautiful and highly populated Puget Sound region of Washington State.
Sorry, no offense intended, just was wondering where you were fishing for red fish and hoping you were located near me so I could discuss that type of fishing with you over lunch. I've fished for them in Florida and Texas but am looking at the possibilities in Louisiana.
 

Matt B

...
WFF Supporter
Sorry, no offense intended, just was wondering where you were fishing for red fish and hoping you were located near me so I could discuss that type of fishing with you over lunch. I've fished for them in Florida and Texas but am looking at the possibilities in Louisiana.
Oh, well the Lowcountry is a specific region of South Carolina and Georgia. Louisiana does look fun though. More sight fishing I think.

 

Jim Darden

Active Member
Oh, well the Lowcountry is a specific region of South Carolina and Georgia. Louisiana does look fun though. More sight fishing I think.

Never got to "low Country" but I did make a "Low Country Boil" which was fantastic. Tried the fishing around Salvo, NC and found it enjoyable, probably like your SC experience. The advantage of that area of the country is that the species of fish varies with the time of the year. I found that pretty exciting, You are lucky to have kin in that area!!
 
My first fish on the fly was a speckled sea trout on the Georgia coast. I flailed my 8 wt. For 8 fishless months before i figured out where to be at what tidal stage.

Your photos took me back to those marshes. Picked a good time of year to go, the rest of the year is hot and humid. Thanks for the share!
 

Prickly Claire

Active Member
Oh, well the Lowcountry is a specific region of South Carolina and Georgia. Louisiana does look fun though. More sight fishing I think.

The SC Low Country is something of a spiritual second home for me (I live in the mountains of Western NC). There are plenty of sight fishing opportunities, but you were definitely there in a transitional time when the fish tend to be just deep enough that sight fishing is tough. From the time the bait shows up in mid-late spring to the time it leaves (typically Novemberish), you can reliably find redfish feeding up in the super skinny water of low tide flats. Once the water really cools down post-Christmas, the fish will often group in very large schools on shallow mudflats, both to take advantage of the warmth produced by the sunlight absorbed by the dark pluff mud and for protection against dolphins, which often target redfish and speckled trout during the cold months when the mullet and menhaden aren't available.

My favorite time to target them for sight fishing, though, comes on the massive "flood" tides around the full and new moons in the summer and early fall, when the water floods the hard bottomed spartina grass flats of the high marsh and allows the redfish to move in and feed on fiddler crabs. This is the scenario which most often produces the phenomenon of tailing redfish and that's about as good as it gets. I love the flood tide fishing because it affords the opportunity to bet out of the boat and wade for them.









Cheers!

Claire
 

Matt B

...
WFF Supporter
The SC Low Country is something of a spiritual second home for me (I live in the mountains of Western NC).
Welcome to the site. I lived in the Lowcountry for 5 years. Met my wife there. So it was my actual 1st home a long time ago and it sure felt good to be back for a while, though I’m sure not wanting to leave the PNW any time soon.
I hope you will toss up a trip report of your own from North Cackalackee.
 

bennysbuddy

the sultan of swing
WFF Supporter
The SC Low Country is something of a spiritual second home for me (I live in the mountains of Western NC). There are plenty of sight fishing opportunities, but you were definitely there in a transitional time when the fish tend to be just deep enough that sight fishing is tough. From the time the bait shows up in mid-late spring to the time it leaves (typically Novemberish), you can reliably find redfish feeding up in the super skinny water of low tide flats. Once the water really cools down post-Christmas, the fish will often group in very large schools on shallow mudflats, both to take advantage of the warmth produced by the sunlight absorbed by the dark pluff mud and for protection against dolphins, which often target redfish and speckled trout during the cold months when the mullet and menhaden aren't available.

My favorite time to target them for sight fishing, though, comes on the massive "flood" tides around the full and new moons in the summer and early fall, when the water floods the hard bottomed spartina grass flats of the high marsh and allows the redfish to move in and feed on fiddler crabs. This is the scenario which most often produces the phenomenon of tailing redfish and that's about as good as it gets. I love the flood tide fishing because it affords the opportunity to bet out of the boat and wade for them.









Cheers!

Claire
Are gators a problem when wade fishing ?
 

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