Camera preferences

GAT

Dumbfounded
If you buy Canon try waiting for a sale on Canon Refurbished, great deals and a one year warranty.
Good suggestion. My Canon DSLR and one of the lens I bought as refurbished and they work just as well as "new". In fact, the refurbished cameras from Canon are tested before they are sold. New ones are not so you're actually ahead to buy one refurbished. BTW, I read an article written by a Canon rep and he said the refurbished cameras are not really used but normally are rep cameras or those used for display at camera shows. This is why they show absolutely no evidence of use because they never really were. They just can't sell them as new once they take them out of the box. But they test them just the same so they can give them a warranty.
 

Kyle Smith

DBA BozoKlown406
The small size and excellent quality of the M43 system makes for an excellent outdoor photography setup.

Here's a testament to the quality of weather-proofing on the higher end Olympus mirrorless cameras:

The E-M5ii can be found for about $350 used, and the weatherproof 14-150ii superzoom around $250. So $600 plus talent for near-professional fishing photos.

Or the Lumix G85 with the 12-60 3.5 lens brand new for about the same price. You lose some zoom range, and it doesn't look as cool. But the user interface is super easy to figure out, and the electronic viewfinder is really good. 4k video if you're into video.

Add whatever lenses you want in the future, maybe a wide zoom, a couple fast primes, a long telephoto. Having fishing GAS and photography GAS is fun!
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cabezon

Sculpin Enterprises
I would never dispute that a DSLR should have the potential for a better quality picture than a point-and-shoot. Of course, it takes a well-informed operator to really bring out the best in both.

But DSLR cameras are also much heavier (over a pound plus the lens) and much bulkier. My point-and-shoot cameras fit in a shirt or vest pocket (and weigh ounces). A DSLR generally would need to be carried in a separate pack; this is less of an issue if you are customarily fishing from a boat.

And then there is the issue of accessing a point-and-shoot vs. the DSLR when that magic moment comes. I'm much more likely to reach for a point-and-shoot when also handling a fish, etc. I do occasionally have my Canon 80D and its telephoto lens with me on my pontoon boat, but I'm using it mostly to shoot scenery and wildlife and carefully pack it away when I'm actually fishing.

Steve
 

tkww

Member
Highly recommend the Olympus TG-5 (TG-6). They have the best image quality of all the rugged compacts. Yes a non-rugged compact or interchange-lens camera can offer you significantly better IQ (particularly an ILC), but for easy handling while holding a fish, durability, and very reasonable size/weight--can't recommend the Oly enough. The video options are sufficient and fun. Battery life has been very acceptable. You can shoot raw if you want too (though the Oly JPG engine is pretty good.)
 

Old Man

Just an Old Man
I bought a waterproof camera about 5 years ago or so. I have yet to take a picture out in the rain or under the water. It's Pentax WG-1. But I have shot the rocks, trees, and the running skinny water. A few Deek and Elk when I come upon them. But alas no fish.
 

Brian Miller

Be vewy vewy qwiet, I'm hunting Cutthwoat Twout
Highly recommend the Olympus TG-5 (TG-6). They have the best image quality of all the rugged compacts.
They also have a few nice accessories like the wide angle and telephoto converter lenses that attach to an optional lens accessory ring. I purchased the lens ring for the TG-5 to use with a circular polarizer and also attach a lens cap to it. I also found an "open box" discounted Sport Holder for $15 that keeps the camera handy to quickly photograph a fish in the net.
 

Bruce Baker

Active Member
I pretty much restrict my DSLR camera (Canon Rebel TSi) when fishing via raft, boat, or drift boat, but lately have gotten lazy and take my point and shoot or phone. When in my float tube or bank fishing, it is either my phone or my point and shoot (Panason Lumix (believe it is a TS4)).
 

teedub

Active Member
I have tried a lot of point and shoot as an experiment. Then I saw the stuff "Cabezon" shoots and decided for the rest of my life I would copy anything he did - he knows his stuff.
 

Tinker

Coigrich
The only problem is that phones are so slippery and terrible ergonomically. I take my phone with me a lot of the time and it's so difficult to do anything one handed or grab it quickly. While the phone takes amazing images, I find that a waterproop point and shoot like the Olympus Tough cameras makes for a significantly easier on-river photography experience.
You buy a case that's grippy for $10 and problem solved. I think mine's an Otterbox Commuter ($19) and I haven't dropped the iPhone yet. Crap! I'm sure I just jinxed myself.
 

Birdbrain

Member
I used an Olympus TG-870 a fair bit, but now I mostly use my iPhone. Both are hung around my neck on lanyards, and tucked into the top of my waders. That way, they are always ready to use, never in the way, and safe from falling into the river. I have my iPhone in a slim case that is waterproof and drop-resistant. I got the case online for about $20, and I like it better than my previous $90 Lifeproof case.

The Olympus TG-870 takes great underwater photos, and both underwater and above water video. Above water still shots are pretty good, and it gives you many options. (Sepia makes for very cool images.) It also has a rear screen that flips up 90 degrees, which makes aiming those underwater shots easy. It's not very good for telephoto shots, but better than my iPhone, which isn't saying much. It's also great for close-up shots. It's a great little camera, but nowadays, as I try to minimize the stuff I carry, I just use my iPhone.
 

jwg

Active Member
The small size and excellent quality of the M43 system makes for an excellent outdoor photography setup.

Here's a testament to the quality of weather-proofing on the higher end Olympus mirrorless cameras:

The E-M5ii can be found for about $350 used, and the weatherproof 14-150ii superzoom around $250. So $600 plus talent for near-professional fishing photos.

Or the Lumix G85 with the 12-60 3.5 lens brand new for about the same price. You lose some zoom range, and it doesn't look as cool. But the user interface is super easy to figure out, and the electronic viewfinder is really good. 4k video if you're into video.

Add whatever lenses you want in the future, maybe a wide zoom, a couple fast primes, a long telephoto. Having fishing GAS and photography GAS is fun!
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I too have the OMD EM5 ii

Excellent camera w excellent lens options.

I take it hiking, but not fishing so far.

I have a waterproof point and shoot for fishing, on a lanyard around my neck, w the camera in my shirt pocket.

I suppose if a cell phone case , perhaps a waterproof one, had an attachment point on the corner, it might also go on a lanyard.

J
 

Brian Miller

Be vewy vewy qwiet, I'm hunting Cutthwoat Twout
I think mine's an Otterbox Commuter ($19) and I haven't dropped the iPhone yet. Crap! I'm sure I just jinxed myself.
I use a fishing log app on my phone that's rated IP68 so I don't worry too much about it in just a grippy case when wading with it tucked away in my Patagonia Atom sling pack phone pocket or a shirt - jacket pocket. If I'm in a float tube or WM, I put it into an Otterbox Commuter with a short loop of 1.5mm Reflx UHMWPE cord passed through the USB and speaker ports in the case, and clip it to an "ID card lanyard" so I can tuck it out of the way in a shirt or jacket pocket.

*edit - To reduce handling stress and keep the fish in the water as much as possible plus speed up the time to release, I use my TG5 kept handy on a pack strap to photograph the fish in the Measure Net. I drop to my knees (wearing kneepads with shin guards) to allow the fish to stay in the water while in the net to remove the fly and get ready to take the photo. I can get the TG5 camera out of the "Sport Holder", turn on, frame the shot, and take the photo with one hand. A quick lift to straighten the net bag for a measurement photo - sometimes the fish can still be free swimming in the net - take the photo, put the net back into the water, check to make sure I've got a good shot, put the camera back into holder, and release the fish by submerging the net and allow the fish to swim out. Then I often take a photo of the lie where the fish was hooked.

Then I get my phone out to log the catch GPS location and data, I connect the phone to the TG5 via wifi and transfer the pics from the camera to the app for the catch (Yes, I'm OCD).
 
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