Choosing a reel for new rod

c-dawg

Active Member
I just finished building a 10'9" 3wt rod using an Arctos blank from PacBay. Is there a method or process for determining what weight reel is best for balance? Or is it just a trial and error, guessing at how much backing and line will weigh on the chosen reel?
 

Peyton00

Active Member
Choose a real in the 2-4 wt sizing.

Dont get fooled by the balanced rod bs.
Is it gonna be balanced while walking the run or balanced with 30 ft of line out or 60 ft.
Is it ever balanced? Lol.
Get a reel that you can afford.
3wt reels are basically line holders.

Good luck.
 

Kyle Smith

DBA BozoKlown406
Choose a real in the 2-4 wt sizing.

Dont get fooled by the balanced rod bs.
Is it gonna be balanced while walking the run or balanced with 30 ft of line out or 60 ft.
Is it ever balanced? Lol.
Get a reel that you can afford.
3wt reels are basically line holders.

Good luck.
I assume this long 3wt will be used for the purpose of euro nymphing. Balance does matter in this case. I'd go with a 6wt reel.
 

IveofIone

Active Member
A 10'9'' 3wt is a long damned rod! Don't buy some tiny little reel designed for a 7'6'' 3 wt! An out of balance rod of any weight will tire you unnecessarily after a full days fishing. Many of us that have to drive for hours to reach our favorite stretch of water don't give up early and start drinking beer-we fish till dark. So maybe 8-12 hours on the water in summer. If you are compensating for an underweight reel the whole time expect some fatigue to occur.

Often the glory of the late evening bite trumps the fatigue but I would prefer to not get so tired in the first place.
 

c-dawg

Active Member
I assume this long 3wt will be used for the purpose of euro nymphing. Balance does matter in this case. I'd go with a 6wt reel.
Yeah, it'll predominately be used for nymphing. I didn't think it would take something as large as a 6wt reel to balance it, but it is a pretty long rod. I'll dig out one of my 5wt reels and see what that looks like.

I've also thought about trying a spey line on it. That could be fun.
 

Kyle Smith

DBA BozoKlown406
Yeah, it'll predominately be used for nymphing. I didn't think it would take something as large as a 6wt reel to balance it, but it is a pretty long rod. I'll dig out one of my 5wt reels and see what that looks like.

I've also thought about trying a spey line on it. That could be fun.
Yeah, 5/6, not 6/7, maybe 4.5-5 oz
 

Chic Worthing

Active Member
What Ive said. You do want it balanced. You can figure out what weight at the reel seat by adding a weight in a plastic bag taping it to the reel seat. Play around with varying the weight until it is balanced. You will need a scale. That weight should be the weight of the reel and the line. There is no reason to not have it balanced.
 

Steve Saville

Active Member
Balance certainly makes some sense when you fish all day long and you're high sticking that rod all day. I have some long rods in small weights for nymphing. I've attempted to balance them the best I can with what I have in the reel category and I've been fairly successful. That being said, I am a four hour fisherman. That's the extent of time I usually spend unless I'm in a boat. I'd find a reel that balances closely and is pleasing to the eye. Also one that fits the budget. It will most probably have to be a larger than normal reel for a 3 wt. rod but make a choice based on your expectations for use but is one you will use.
 

the_grube

Active Member
I won't dis-regard others experience, context is everything. I also fully admit that I might just be out of touch with this aspect of gear configuration, but, for my fishing so far the weight of the reel has been virtually irrelevant. Any fly reel designed for the rod size that will hold the amount of line I need works for me without having to get a postage scale out to figure out the swing weight or balance of the setup. @Peyton00 made a great point too. How do you know what your balance point is, is it with a WF line and 45' out past the tip, a DT line with 15'... etc? Do you need a rod/reel combo for all your fishing situations?

I could see where fishing styles make a difference tough. More often than not, when I'm lifting my rod I'm moving line with it, casting or mending or holding a good chunk of it off the water in a dead drift. In those cases, particularly in casting, the weight of the line loading the rod seems to mask any difference in the reel weight.

my .2cents which when adjusted for inflation are probably not worth the time it took to type this.
 

Old Man

Just an Old Man
Balance certainly makes some sense when you fish all day long and you're high sticking that rod all day. I have some long rods in small weights for nymphing. I've attempted to balance them the best I can with what I have in the reel category and I've been fairly successful. That being said, I am a four hour fisherman. That's the extent of time I usually spend unless I'm in a boat. I'd find a reel that balances closely and is pleasing to the eye. Also one that fits the budget. It will most probably have to be a larger than normal reel for a 3 wt. rod but make a choice based on your expectations for use but is one you will use.
I have no information on reel weight. I just wanted to comment on Steve's 4 hour fishing time. I have you beat on fishing time on the water, I'm good for about an hour and then I need to rest or take a nap or drink a beer. I have many aches and pains. I guess being 84 has something to with it. But I get out when I can. Been thinking of getting another floating device so I can sit on top of the water to fish. My walking skinny water days are gone.
 
Having used to be an employee of PacBay, and actually being a small part of developing/testing that blank you're building, I can tell you you're going to love it! My favorite configuration of that series that I built was what I called the "bastard spey". I put a 2.5" fighting butt on it, and paired it with an older fenwick click drag. On one spool I had a commando head for my trout spey needs, and on the other I had a standard WF line (can't remember which). To speak to your question of reels, the older click/drag i had was very light, and I never found it to be uncomfortable or out of balance with where I'd positioned it on the blank. Typically I'd either purpose a rod specifically for nymphing or specifically for spey, but sometimes it's fun to build and fish "bastards".
 

Mark Koch

Active Member
For tight line, euro or whatever you want to call it nymphing, balance is very important. Fatigue is a factor but also feel/sensitivity. With the rod handle balanced in my ring finger and the heal of my hand I can lightly place my index finger on top of the blank and can feel the point fly bounce along the bottom and feel the take on the point or dropper.

My reels have backing, then running line, then 45' dry fly line head, then 18' euro leader. If a hatch starts I can take off the euro leader and put on my standard 12' dry fly leader. Want to throw larger streamers, remove leader and dry fly line head and put on OPST Commando with tips.

It may sound complicated but, with one setup I can do any style called for during the day.
 

Attachments

Steve Saville

Active Member
Well Jim, time catches up to all of us. I'm a baby at 72 ( in a couple of weeks) and I'm loaded with aches and pains as most of us that age are. I do enjoy getting out but less often these days. There was a summer that I fished 27 days in a row. Not now. I'm lucky to get out every 27 days. :cool:
 

David Loy

Senior Moment
Balance is important to me, and mine is the only opinion I care about. It doesn’t have to be perfect, as in tenths if an ounce, but it’s worth the effort to get close. I’d guess around 5 to 6oz for the rod mentioned. I use Bauer reels in the 6 to 6.5oz range on an 11’ 4wt and a 10.5’ 5wt. I personally aim at a balance point on my right index finger (as I carry the rod) once line is strung. Somewhere near the first two fingers is close enough.
 

Latest posts

Top