NFR A Beartooth Pass OOPS!

Salmo_g

Well-Known Member
Thankfully all's well that ends well, in this case. The story reminds me of one where a family followed their GPS to take a route on a gravel road in a remote area of Oregon along the Rogue River through the mountains. The road isn't maintained during the winter, and the car got stuck in snow. The father/husband left his family and tried to walk for help. Unfortunately he died. Can't remember how the family was found and rescued.
 

dld

Active Member
Winter travel is no joke. Growing up in pre-cellphone Montana, my father always had cold weather provisions in the car, even when traveling between Bozeman and Billings. We had sleeping bags, snow boots, hats, extra socks, in addition to our normal winter wear.

A couple of years ago, I had my truck break down going up Homestake pass. It was about ten degrees out, I had it fixed in fifteen minutes, but I was very happy that I had my artic bib Carhart's with me (my hand-rabbits were helpful, also).

The closest I have come to hypothermia was when I put my 1949 Chev in the ditch and tried to dig it out sans proper weather gear...in -15deg snow. I was 1/3rd mile from my house. Spent fifteen minutes digging, then fifteen walking home, I was done, and had to take measures to warm up.
 

802flyfish

Active Member
Thankfully all's well that ends well, in this case. The story reminds me of one where a family followed their GPS to take a route on a gravel road in a remote area of Oregon along the Rogue River through the mountains. The road isn't maintained during the winter, and the car got stuck in snow. The father/husband left his family and tried to walk for help. Unfortunately he died. Can't remember how the family was found and rescued.
Family was spotted walking along the road via helicopter if I recall correctly.

 

Old406Kid

Active Member
Thankfully all's well that ends well, in this case. The story reminds me of one where a family followed their GPS to take a route on a gravel road in a remote area of Oregon along the Rogue River through the mountains. The road isn't maintained during the winter, and the car got stuck in snow. The father/husband left his family and tried to walk for help. Unfortunately he died. Can't remember how the family was found and rescued.
I remember that well. I think this guy was lucky as his cell phone was probably useless but his truck was most likely equipped with a satellite tracking system.

Having grown up in Billings, that was my playground and I've been snowed on in June, July, and August.
I have some old 4th of July pictures of us meeting the big rotary plow and the road closed at the Sunlight Basin turn off.
 

JE

Active Member
My dad grew up in Munich, North Dakota. I remember visiting the family farm one summer - I was probably 7 or 8 years old. I noticed that everyone had new cars in that small town. I asked my dad why - he said 'Because if your car breaks down in the winter, you'll die."
 

Yard Sale

Huge Member
Warning: thread drift

after watching the Les Stroud survivorman episode on a car breakdown in snow I added a zero degree bag, some clothes and some water/food to a bag in my truck. I should probably add a flare gun but I don’t go to far from the beaten path in winter. I leave my best headlamp on my shifter and always have a few lighters in my truck. A jar of cotton balls soaked in lighter jelly would be wise, might add that this weekend.

Wondering what you guys carry in case of getting stuck.
 

GeorgeV

Active Member
Some warm cloths, charged up cell phone and AAA towing insurance, then stay home if the weather bad.
 

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