Easier Non Slip Loop Knots?

Nick Clayton

Well-Known Member
WFF Supporter
We use non slip loop knots on a lot of our tuna troll gear, especially swim baits.

I've never seen a knot actually break, but we've learned that we do have to replace/retie the loop every so often as that heavy troll gear fished day after day will eventually wear weak spots into the mono and cause a failure. Going 7 days a week and often fishing the same troll spread every day I'd say we go thru and retie everything about once a week to keep it fresh.

So if you're fishing a fly for a long time, or catching a ton of fish on it, its probably a good idea to retie every so often just to be safe. That has nothing to do with that particular knot, but more just loops in general
 

Ron McNeal

I know not the heart of another man.
I've never had a No-Slip Loop Knot fail. But, then, I just target smaller fish..........
And, FWIW, after three years of using this knot almost exclusively, I've learned to tie them so that the loops are (usually....) real small - about 1/8th inch. Very neat and satisfying to tie when they come out right.
 

cmann886

Active Member
I'm using loop knots more and more but have to admit that I struggle with them and take way too much time to achieve a good knot with a small loop
I'll add that at 70, eyesight plays a part in it along with a thumb that I modified in a jointer 25 years ago.

While I was looking for something else this video popped up and looks like something I might try.
(The link I just posted was the wrong one, be right back. :D )
Here's the right one.

Any other suggestions?
Thank you for posting this video clip. I have been trying to get a smaller loop and had been happy with one 5-10 times the size I can get with this technique and it is so much easier to do.
 

cmann886

Active Member
I used to use loop knots. I absolutely refuse to now. Lost too many big fish because of them.
the best knot to use is the one that you tie the best. I currently loose fewer fish/flies with the loop knot than anything else that I use fly fishing. With gear, the tri-line or other clinch knot variation seems to hold plenty well.
 

jamma

Active Member
Mentioned this one in another post, the Double overhand. I have used the standard non-slip loop knot for years and have had ongoing issues with the knot kinking the standing line and/or not seating properly. This one, at least so far, seems to be foolproof and creates a loop that comes straight off the standing line. Am looking forward to see how it performs in the future.
 

David Loy

Senior Moment
I have had non-slip loop knots fail, but as Stonefish indicated it was likely due to operator error. Seems like it happens when the fly strikes something behind me. I still use it on streamers though because it has to be more lifelike. My grand experiment now is to only use Maxima (ultra green) 5’ leaders ending in 8#. Its toughness is well documented and the jury’s still out on fluro. (That and trying not to hit shit on the back cast.)
I did appreciate the vid showing the hemo in the loop. That should make it an easier tie.
 

Brian Miller

Be vewy vewy qwiet, I'm hunting Cutthwoat Twout
WFF Supporter
I am curious what you are saying here.
191211 Akiyamago.JPG
This is an Akiyamago kebari (fly) with a length of Griffin #2 beading silk tied onto the shank first to form an eye and tail. It's customarily tied on an "eyeless" hook. Instead of an eye the shank has a flat rounded spade-shaped end to keep the thread from unraveling. The non-rigid eye allows the Akiyamago fly to have a little more "action", like using a non-slip loop knot.

The version above uses a Peacock Herl body. I tie a "clipped hackle" variation that uses just the Furnace hackle trimmed close to the stem to form the body and use a regular TMC 100 hook. They can be greased to fish as a very effective dry fly. I think they work even better sans-floatant and fish dry until waterlogged then wet. After a few false casts it fishes dry again.
_PC110485-2.jpg

I can understand if I'm using 3X or larger tippet where a fly might have have a better action with a non-slip loop. But with 4X, 5X, or smaller tippet is there a difference when using a non-slip loop?
 
Last edited:

jwg

Active Member
View attachment 219737
This is an Akiyamago kebari (fly) with a length of Griffin #2 beading silk tied onto the shank first to form an eye and tail. It's customarily tied on an "eyeless" hook. Instead of an eye the shank has a flat rounded spade-shaped end to keep the thread from unraveling. The non-rigid eye allows the Akiyamago fly to have a little more "action", like using a non-slip loop knot.

The version above uses a Peacock Herl body. I tie a "clipped hackle" variation that uses just the Furnace hackle trimmed close to the stem to form the body and use a regular TMC 100 hook. They can be greased to fish as a very effective dry fly. I think they work even better sans-floatant and fish dry until waterlogged then wet. After a few false casts it fishes dry again.
View attachment 219772

I can understand if I'm using 3X or larger tippet where a fly might have have a better action with a non-slip loop. But with 4X, 5X, or smaller tippet is there a difference when using a non-slip loop?
One might also be able to swap these types of flys on and off with a loop to loop connection.

I realize, then we still have a loop in the tippet, but swapping flies without the time or dexterity to make knots and perfect them could be hand.

I also realize this is contrary to Tenkara simplicity, where you use one fly and stick to it.

very cool flies!

jay
 

Brian Miller

Be vewy vewy qwiet, I'm hunting Cutthwoat Twout
WFF Supporter
I also realize this is contrary to Tenkara simplicity, where you use one fly and stick to it.
Yeeeaaaahh, I've had some days where I've caught a number of fish with one fly but my "manipulation" chops aren't at a level for me to wholly embrace the "one fly" concept. And I'm not alone on that in the global "community". To me the idea of "simplicity" (as opposed to "minimalism") has more to do with things like not being committed to having to purchase expensive stuff that I can demonstrably show I don't need to catch fish because I can use skills instead, and patterns that are easy to tie but effective. Also the mano-a-mano aspect of it with a good sized fish in heavy current is pretty exciting.
 
  • Like
Reactions: jwg

Support WFF | Remove the Ads

Support WFF by upgrading your account. Site supporters benefits include no ads and access to some additional features, few now, more in the works. Info
Top
AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

That said, WFF displays just a single ad regardless of the device, and that ad helps cover the server fees. The position and size of the ad has been set to minimize impact to your experience, negating the need for adblocking the site. Disable your AdBlocker / Whitelist WashingtonFlyFishing.com to continue using the site. Thanks.

I've Disabled AdBlock