Thin Wool Glove Liner Recommendations

Old406Kid

Active Member
I just read an post on another site wher guys are wearing a thin wool glove under nitrile.
I've tried the straight nitrile in colder temps and with my hands sweating always ended up with cold hands. I actually do better than that bare handed.
Today I was doing some outside work with rubber palmed knit gloves and also found them uncomfortably cold.
Anyway the wool liners over nitrile sounds like a good idea if you can still have reasonable dexterity.

Your thoughts?
 

Stonefish

Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater....Know Grizzler
Not wool, but I wear a light polypropylene liner under my nitrile gloves in the winter.
The liner wicks moisture away and still allows me to tie knots.
I’ll wear a pair of Simms Windstopper fingerless gloves over the nitrile and liner, though only when it is super cold.
Those combos have worked very well for me for a number of years.

Whatever you do, make sure you accommodate for the liner when you buy your nitriles.
Just like overly tight wading boots can make your feet cold, the same goes for tight gloves and hands.
SF
 

Old406Kid

Active Member
Not wool, but I wear a light polypropylene liner under my nitrile gloves in the winter.
The liner wicks moisture away and still allows me to tie knots.
I’ll wear a pair of Simms Windstopper fingerless gloves over the nitrile and liner, though only when it is super cold.
Those combos have worked very well for me for a number of years.

Whatever you do, make sure you accommodate for the liner when you buy your nitriles.
Just like overly tight wading boots can make your feet cold, the same goes for tight gloves and hands.
SF
Thanks, I hadn't thought about polypro.
 

Bowbonehead

Active Member
Any way you do it...... if your hands sweat ...... wet = cold You guys are fishing a much warmer climate than here where we need 5 or 6 days of high thirty's (5 to 10 Celsius ) just to melt the slush in the river enough to fish which won't likely happen now till February Chinooks occur....... at that point I where a thin pair of gloves liners under some fleece fold over mitts and rarely touch a fish if I can avoid it in the release Dry hands are warm hands although stripping line eventually gets them wet......
 

Old406Kid

Active Member
Any way you do it...... if your hands sweat ...... wet = cold You guys are fishing a much warmer climate than here where we need 5 or 6 days of high thirty's (5 to 10 Celsius ) just to melt the slush in the river enough to fish which won't likely happen now till February Chinooks occur....... at that point I where a thin pair of gloves liners under some fleece fold over mitts and rarely touch a fish if I can avoid it in the release Dry hands are warm hands although stripping line eventually gets them wet......
I'm either over on the far east side of the state or western MT so we have alot of days in the 30's to 40's Fahrenheit, also many days below that but at 70 years old I'll find something else to do unless the fish are 2' long. :D
 

Hatty

Active Member
I have settled on military surplus wool gloves. I take several pairs in boat bag. Like four or five. A few gloves I cut some fingers off of. These for stripping line and casting, tying knots. Full fingered ones for rowing. Whenever gloves get too wet I swing and smack them on something hard like a rock, oar shaft, etc. to remove excess water. Even a wet or damp wool glove will be pretty warm in a minute or so. But it is hardly ever below freezing in my world anymore.
 
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JesseC

Active Member
Glacier Gloves sells a fingerless cold weather glove that I’ve used for winter steelheading for the last 5 years.

$15 a pair. Hard to beat
 

Buzzy

Active Member
WFF Supporter
I use the thinsulate/smart wool gloves in winter. Just wring them out and they are warm in a minute.
:) Some folks just have better circulation in their hands (and feet) than others. Your technique used to work for me but somewhere along the line senior citizenitis and cold hands (and feet) came along. I need to try @Stonefish's suggestion of the poly liner inside nitrile....
 

Salmo_g

Well-Known Member
WFF Supporter
Buzzy, I will try Stonefish's suggestion this winter as well, but want to mention what I did last winter. I've used fleece gloves for years, cutting about an inch off the ends of the thumbs and first two fingers so I can hold line and tie knots. Last winter I stuck one of those shaker Hotties in the glove on the backs of my hands, and that worked great. Although it's my palms and fingers that get cold, placing that little Hottie on my palm would interfere with hold the rod and casting. Having the heat source on the back of my hands still works fine at keeping palms and fingers warm.
 

Old Man

A very Old Man
WFF Supporter
I have also noted that the cold weather has gotten through my gloves to make my fingers cold and hurt. When I was stationed in Greenland for a year while in the service I got very close to frostbite in my fingertips. Now the least bit of cold and my tips turn white. I usually stick my fingers in my mouth when that happens.. Note: I would probably be better off if I stuck them up my ass, But they wouldn't taste very good after that.:(:(
 

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