Touch or sight?

Salmo_g

Well-Known Member
WFF Supporter
I like both, but sight often leads to eye strain. Having spent some time now using bobbers and nymphs for river fishing and with chironomids in lakes, I'm almost as comfortable watching the bobber as I am with watching dry flies, the main difference seems to be that I have to react faster to "bobber down" than to the "God save the Queen" response to a dry fly being taken. Regarding the eye strain, boat fishing on a river offers relief as you can switch out time on the oars while your partner fishes. In my pram on a lake, there is no relief. So I open a beer and miss over half the take downs that are happening. I really should go fishing with Ira and try to learn how to drink beer and catch trout at the same time.
 

Mike Ediger

Active Member
WFF Supporter
There’s no question that the tug is the drug for me. However, that tug can come from stripping a bug on any line: full sink, intermediate, midge tip, or floating. It can come swinging a sculpin through a run on a river. It can come after casting a parachute Adams or Caddis on a North Idaho cutthroat stream. It can come after casting an emerger or cripple to big fish cruising the shoreline as I walk the perimeter of a desert lake. It can come after a 70 foot cast with a small mayfly to a rising head out middle of the lake, even if I can’t even see whether he took it or not. It can also come lifting the rod after seeing an indicator go down.
Another thing about indicator fishing though, is that it’s the only style of fishing thats given me a 50 fish day on Stillwater. If the indicator was only going down once an hour either I’m doing something wrong or I am just going to abandon that tactic. But on a good day with the potential for big fish, the anticipation and excitement watching an indicator go down over and over again, or even just a wiggle, can be incredibly exciting.
So the tug is the drug for sure, but there are a lot of ways to get that fix.
 
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pond monkey

Active Member
There’s no question that the tug is the drug for me. However, that tug can come from stripping a bug on any line: full sink, intermediate, midge tip, or floating. It can come swinging a sculpin through a run on a river. It can come after casting a parachute Adams or Caddis on a North Idaho cutthroat stream. It can come after casting an emerger or cripple to big fish cruising the shoreline as I walk the perimeter of a desert lake. It can come after a 70 foot cast with a small mayfly to a rising head out middle of the lake, even if I can’t even see whether he took it or not. It can also come lifting the rod after seeing an indicator go down.
Another thing about indicator fishing though, is that it’s the only style of fishing thats given me a 50 fish day on Stillwater. If the indicator was only going down once an hour either I’m doing something wrong or I am just going to abandon that tactic. But on a good day with the potential for big fish, the anticipation and excitement watching an indicator go down over and over again, or even just a wiggle, can be incredibly exciting.
So the tug is the drug for sure, but there are a lot of ways to get that fix.
I think indicator fishing compares well to dry fly fishing ......instead of constantly watching a floating fly though, you’re focused on an indicator ( how novel).......no bird watching or daydreaming allowed and not as much casting....just a sharp visual focusing at all times.
The best thing is that you’re rewarded with both the visual taking......and a half second later the tightening or the grab...... twice the fun....
 
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onefish

Active Member
If you have the rod in your hand and are slowly retrieving your indicator, especially in shallow water, you will often times get a rather large tug as the indicator plunges downward ( the best of both worlds). Many times while doing the retrieve the other rod will start screaming as the fish has grabbed the chronie and is hell bent on getting away. And as Mike Ediger stated, this is the best way I know to have a 50 fish day. There is nothing quite like it when you are dialed in chronie fishing.
 
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