Let's Talk Two-Handed Beach Rods

Uncle Stu

Active Member
Wondering which fly line would be the best line for Boost Beach? I've been thinking about the 7wt. Rio OutBound short, both the float & the S3 or 6...
I've said this before and so have others... Airflo lines seem to be more durable in the grueling conditions we deal with in the surf. I use the 40+ Sniper Extreme 8w 3 IPS on my Echo 6w 11' switch.

Airflo also makes a specialized Beach/Surf line which I also own, but for shallow beaches, ihe sinking tip drags the bottom too much for my taste.
 

Gregobr

Active Member
WFF Supporter
Wondering which fly line would be the best line for Boost Beach? I've been thinking about the 7wt. Rio OutBound short, both the float & the S3 or 6...
For surf fishing, perch mainly here in OR, I like the Airflo Beach line in Int/S7 and for jetty fishing for rockfish I like the Cortland Compact Int/S9.
 

NRC

Active Member
WFF Supporter
I recently acquired a new-to-me two hander off a forum member - 6wt boost beach. I’ve been interested in trying out the two handed game and decided now was the time. Here are my thoughts so far, in no particular order.

It takes a lot of discipline to learn a new casting type when you can just pick up your old single hander and get more distance! As a newbie to 2 handed casting I’m only consistently getting it out between 50-60 ft., with better casts up to 75’ or so sprinkled in very infrequently when the stars align. I’m a big believer in not blaming on my boots the faults of my feet, and practice makes perfect, so this is no indictment of the rod or the casting style by any means.

But, the world I currently live in is one where that’s the distance I get. And with that in mind, my main complaint at present is that since the shooting head is just under 40’, I’m essentially ripping line out of the water up to that distance away for the backcast and landing my fly pretty much right where I just created a disturbance by ripping line out for my backcast, if that makes sense. Not really an aspect I had thought about, but I like that with a single hander I can haul to add distance to my cast without ever slapping the water and creating a disturbance.

I.e. the ratio of length of water disturbed to average length of cast for me is currently about 35:55 on my two hander, and about 20:80 on my single hander. Not to mention I’m able to snap my line out of the water much more quietly with my single hander.

Curious to hear you two hander people’s thoughts on this. Are you typically getting a distance that makes that ratio not matter? Or are you able to snap your line out of the water in a way you feel doesn’t put the fish off? Or is there some other element I’m missing to that whole equation?

Anyway, both times I’ve fished it so far I’ve gotten skunked, so next outing I will probably single hand it until I adequately bust the slump before switching back. But I have definitely enjoyed my intro to two handed casting so far and will continue to dig in.
 

Uncle Stu

Active Member
NRC, how long is your new Boost? (congrats, BTW) I have the 11' Echo Classic switch and I can't cast it any further than I could with a one hander, but it saves my shoulder lots of grief and allows me to fish in comfort for hours. I use an integrated line (Sniper) with about 30' head and my cast is maybe double that? But I also have a brand new spey rod with a shooting head that shoots my entire line and head. THAT is exciting.

Also--the surf is so messy and noisy, I've never given any thought to the disturbance created by my false roll cast. I will say however that in SE AK, I was able to land some nice chrome coho casting that rig in that same overhead style, in still frog water, and they can be spooky.
 

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NRC

Active Member
WFF Supporter
NRC, how long is your new Boost? (congrats, BTW) I have the 11' Echo Classic switch and I can't cast it any further than I could with a one hander, but it saves my shoulder lots of grief and allows me to fish in comfort for hours. I use an integrated line (Sniper) with about 30' head and my cast is maybe double that? But I also have a brand new spey rod with a shooting head that shoots my entire line and head. THAT is exciting.

Also--the surf is so messy and noisy, I've never given any thought to the disturbance created by my false roll cast. I will say however that in SE AK, I was able to land some nice chrome coho casting that rig in that same overhead style, in still frog water, and they can be spooky.
Thanks! It’s 12’. I’ve been struggling to dig down into the depths of integrated versus non integrated heads, etc., but I know that to realize my hope of being able to launch a full line two handed or spey casting, I’m gonna have to dig down into the guts of it. For now, though, plenty of work to do just getting down a reliable stroke that doesn’t result in line and leader birds nesting together and stuff like that.

but man, with that coho and your talk of spey casting your whole line, you’re certainly re-lighting the fire! And interesting to hear that you’ve seen spooky fish not be bothered by the line pulling off the water for the overhead cast. But that would mean I’d have to explain my two recent skunkings some other way. Unacceptable!
 

wetswinger

Active Member
I understand your concern of making a ruckus on the water. I have found that I only need about thirty feet of line out to load my rod. I try to do only one roll cast to get that amount of line out. Then, I have found that I can still get a good cast out by throwing to the left away from the false cast. So I typically start at the three o'clock position and work my way left in a semi circle until I get to the nine o'clock position. Using a short headed (30') heavy line let's you load the rod without needing a lot line on the water. Learn to water haul, using the friction of the line on the water, to load your backcast and then let her rip. A good cast is a shake to get some line out, a roll cast to water haul and the forward cast. With these long rods it helps to slow way down and let the rod do the work..check your rods grain weight rating and make sure your line matches. Enjoy...
 
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Stonefish

Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater....Know Grizzler
On Puget Sound, that last 30’ or whatever is awfully valuable real estate you’re giving up if you aren’t fishing it.
6-7’ seems optimum.
Just saying, but we’ve had this discussing in past threads haven’t we?
It’s all about sacrifices, shoulders, elbows etc......;)
SF
 

Uncle Stu

Active Member
NRC, I get skunked more often than I catch fish. The locals around here all use bait and the occasional lure for surf perch and stripers. Regarding my new rod--I got it recently on Spey Pages and I was guided through the line quagmire by a fellow forum member on Stripers Online. These forums can be very helpful. He owns the same rod and was able to recommend the perfect Scandi head, which I looped onto a running line that I made from an old line I wasn't using. I'm not spey casting yet, but I'm using an overhead cast that starts horizontal on the back cast, also called an oval or Belgian cast. Not far off from a single spey, really.

Here's some more inspiration from last summer on the beach (6w Echo Classic switch 11' rod)
 

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wetswinger

Active Member
Thanks! It’s 12’. I’ve been struggling to dig down into the depths of integrated versus non integrated heads, etc., but I know that to realize my hope of being able to launch a full line two handed or spey casting, I’m gonna have to dig down into the guts of it. For now, though, plenty of work to do just getting down a reliable stroke that doesn’t result in line and leader birds nesting together and stuff like that.

but man, with that coho and your talk of spey casting your whole line, you’re certainly re-lighting the fire! And interesting to hear that you’ve seen spooky fish not be bothered by the line pulling off the water for the overhead cast. But that would mean I’d have to explain my two recent skunkings some other way. Unacceptable!
In this link, back on page 6, Gregobr posted a video of Andrew Moy teaching the modern 2-hand casting technique. It's what I strive for. You don't always have to make a homerun cast, until you do....enjoy.
 

Randall Clark

Huge Fly Guy
On Puget Sound, that last 30’ or whatever is awfully valuable real estate you’re giving up if you aren’t fishing it.
6-7’ seems optimum.
It's not just the Puget Sound....

I can't tell you how many surf perch I've caught literally at my feet. Probably the same number of cutties you've done the same (well, probably less because I likely don't fish for surf perch as much as you fish the Sound).
 

tyler

Active Member
i tried a two hander off the beach for a couple coho seasons. Eleven foot 6 weight. it was okay. pretty much all overhead casting. i could really launch the casts but i found that i was losing more fish. especially when the fish ate far out. too much line out. or me just being a clutz. and like SF mentioned above, because of the rod length and water haul i was picking my fly up too soon to start the next cast. effectively missing the last 30 or so feet of my retrieve. maybe i was doing it wrong...

nice stripah, Uncle Stu!
 

Elliott5400

Active Member
I recently acquired a new-to-me two hander off a forum member - 6wt boost beach. I’ve been interested in trying out the two handed game and decided now was the time. Here are my thoughts so far, in no particular order.

It takes a lot of discipline to learn a new casting type when you can just pick up your old single hander and get more distance! As a newbie to 2 handed casting I’m only consistently getting it out between 50-60 ft., with better casts up to 75’ or so sprinkled in very infrequently when the stars align. I’m a big believer in not blaming on my boots the faults of my feet, and practice makes perfect, so this is no indictment of the rod or the casting style by any means.

But, the world I currently live in is one where that’s the distance I get. And with that in mind, my main complaint at present is that since the shooting head is just under 40’, I’m essentially ripping line out of the water up to that distance away for the backcast and landing my fly pretty much right where I just created a disturbance by ripping line out for my backcast, if that makes sense. Not really an aspect I had thought about, but I like that with a single hander I can haul to add distance to my cast without ever slapping the water and creating a disturbance.

I.e. the ratio of length of water disturbed to average length of cast for me is currently about 35:55 on my two hander, and about 20:80 on my single hander. Not to mention I’m able to snap my line out of the water much more quietly with my single hander.

Curious to hear you two hander people’s thoughts on this. Are you typically getting a distance that makes that ratio not matter? Or are you able to snap your line out of the water in a way you feel doesn’t put the fish off? Or is there some other element I’m missing to that whole equation?

Anyway, both times I’ve fished it so far I’ve gotten skunked, so next outing I will probably single hand it until I adequately bust the slump before switching back. But I have definitely enjoyed my intro to two handed casting so far and will continue to dig in.
Glad you like the rod itself.

I just never got into the feel of the process. Always went running back to the faithful single hand.

I think I touched that rod 4-5 times if that.
 

Bagman

Active Member
@NRC What weight is your head? 40 feet is not too long for a 12 foot rod, but it will work if it's the right grain weight. You might also try to bring your casting stroke a little closer to sidearm.
 

Uncle Stu

Active Member
On Puget Sound, that last 30’ or whatever is awfully valuable real estate you’re giving up if you aren’t fishing it.
6-7’ seems optimum.
Just saying, but we’ve had this discussing in past threads haven’t we?
It’s all about sacrifices, shoulders, elbows etc......;)
SF
Haha--its all one big discussion! The same issues and solutions keep recurring but for some reason, I never tire of it. My wife wishes I would.

Seriously--that last 30' is very important. Lots of fish hooked in close, from cutties and coho to perch and striper. Many beaches have a lip or dropoff in the shorebreak where the fish like to cruise for snacks. I'm now fishing a 35' shooting head that I dont want to bring inside my guides. On the beach, I just back up and keep stripping to make sure my fly gets down along that ledge. When you're standing still in PS up to your waist, I dunno... integrated line I guess?
 

Stonefish

Triploid, Humpy & Seaplane Hater....Know Grizzler
Haha--its all one big discussion! The same issues and solutions keep recurring but for some reason, I never tire of it. My wife wishes I would.

Seriously--that last 30' is very important. Lots of fish hooked in close, from cutties and coho to perch and striper. Many beaches have a lip or dropoff in the shorebreak where the fish like to cruise for snacks. I'm now fishing a 35' shooting head that I dont want to bring inside my guides. On the beach, I just back up and keep stripping to make sure my fly gets down along that ledge. When you're standing still in PS up to your waist, I dunno... integrated line I guess?
You could name that last 30’ in front of you the crazy hot matrix zone....because a lot of cool and crazy shit happens in it!
SF
 
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