Wading Staffs

cdnred

Active Member
I'm in the market for a foldable wading staff to use when river fly fishing. Something that could be worn on a belt and extended qwikly if needed. I've read some reviews on wading staffs and find the number one concern most people have is losing the tip and not being able to get replacement tips (Orvis). Any recommendations for what I should be looklng at to get would be most helpful and appreciated..?
 
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Brian Miller

Be vewy vewy qwiet, I'm hunting Cutthwoat Twout
WFF Supporter
These trekking poles work for me, are as sturdy as my Black Diamond poles, and the Black Diamond tips and rubber tip covers fit.
High Stream Gear Short Collapsible Hiking & Trekking Poles, 2 Lightweight Foldable Walking Sticks, with Unique Belt Mounted Holsters 115 - 135 cm

$50 for two poles, includes rubber tip covers and two belt pouches
 

sroffe

Active Member
in the classified section there is a thread that you should check out. A gentleman makes custom wading staffs, quite reasonable price, and very sturdy. A few on the forum have bought and been very happy with them.
 

Zak

WFF Supporter
I have a Folstaff, but I I prefer an ash wood stick. The metal staff seems noisy underwater and I have had it pull apart when the rip gets jammed between rocks.
 
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Brian Miller

Be vewy vewy qwiet, I'm hunting Cutthwoat Twout
WFF Supporter
I have a Folstaff, but I I prefer an ash wood stick. The metal staff seems noisy underwater and I have had it pull apart when the rip gets jammed between rocks.
Wood staffs are very nice. Because they're solid they don't have the harmonic vibration that hollow aluminum poles have. They're also great for beating down briers when bushwhacking. The vibration in very fast water prompts me to be cautious though, and wood staffs don't fold up to be stowed in a (wading belt) belt pouch; a real convenience.
The HSG poles I mentioned above have steel cables vs bungees to connect the sections and a positive lock so they will not come apart when twisted and/or pulled up when the tip becomes wedged.
 

cdnred

Active Member
I have a Folstaff, but I I prefer an ash wood stick. The metal staff seems noisy underwater and I have had it pull apart when the rip gets jammed between rocks.
I know what you mean about the ash wood stick being your preference but it's kinda hard to put away when not needed. I was hoping to get something that collapses as I don't plan to be using all the time but have it handy when the need comes. I had read great reviews of the Folstaff so that's why I was leaning towards them..
 
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cdnred

Active Member
Wood staffs are very nice. Because they're solid they don't have the harmonic vibration that hollow aluminum poles have. They're also great for beating down briers when bushwhacking. The vibration in very fast water prompts me to be cautious though, and wood staffs don't fold up to be stowed in a (wading belt) belt pouch; a real convenience.
The HSG poles I mentioned above have steel cables vs bungees to connect the sections and a positive lock so they will not come apart when twisted and/or pulled up when the tip becomes wedged.
For the price 2 for 1, they can't be beat plus it comes with a holster to store it while fishing. I'll have to check it out more, Thanks for the tip.. :)

When using the rubber tips, did you have any issues with them coming off easily..? Do they just fit over the spiked ends or screw in separately..?
 
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gt

Active Member
i don't like collapsable poles as mine is at the ready at all times. made mine from a tent pole, about 40" long, plugged both ends, wrapped a hand grip, it floats, tied to my wading belt it is always in reach for use. make sure you get one long enough as some of the trekking poles are way to short for this job.
 

Brian Miller

Be vewy vewy qwiet, I'm hunting Cutthwoat Twout
WFF Supporter
For the price 2 for 1, they can't be beat plus it comes with a holster to store it while fishing. I'll have to check it out more, Thanks for the tip.. :)

When using the rubber tips, did you have any issues with them coming off easily..? Do they just fit over the spiked ends or screw in separately..?
Honestly the rubber tips that came with the poles to fit over the carbide tips seem a bit loose. I had some rubber tips for my BD poles from REI (Komperdell) that have never come off the BD or HSG poles in 6 or 7 years of use.
 

Brian Miller

Be vewy vewy qwiet, I'm hunting Cutthwoat Twout
WFF Supporter
i don't like collapsable poles as mine is at the ready at all times. made mine from a tent pole, about 40" long, plugged both ends, wrapped a hand grip, it floats, tied to my wading belt it is always in reach for use. make sure you get one long enough as some of the trekking poles are way to short for this job.
I recommend using a Gear Keeper Wading Staff Retractor. I keep it pinned to the belt holster and the spring tension is strong enough to keep the pole handle pulled up to the holster and at my finger tips when I want the pole deployed but want my hands free.
Trekking poles that have telescoping or folding sections will get water in them. DO NOT use in salt water or thoroughly rinse afterwards! I had to replace the lower sections and scrub the top section on a BD pole with a shotgun brush due to salt corrosion.
Strongly recommend opening them up and letting them air-dry out after use.
I'm 5'11" and use 120 cm - 125 cm settings on my trekking poles for hiking and wading.
 

Salmo_g

WFF Supporter
If you get a folding or collapsible staff, be sure that the sections lock together or else you'll have a miserable time when the damn thing sticks in the rocks, mud, and whatever. And it will get stuck. Often. As for replacing tips, you can buy boxes of 2 or 4 at the pharmacy where they are sold as tips for canes and walkers. Glue them on with expoxy.
 

kmudgn

Active Member
I prefer the Simms type locking staff as opposed to the folstaff. I used a fostaff for years (and now keep as spare), but often had problems with sections coming apart when distal end got stuck in mud or wedged between rocks. With the Simms locking staff that is not an issue
 

Gary Thompson

dirty dog
I have a collapsible wading staff and I use some duct tape on the tip to cut down on the clicking noise also to help it not get stuck in the mud.
(sorry I don't remember the brand) I got it on a close out at Sierra Trading Post
It has a bungee lanyard that I can hook to the bag or my wading belt.
My lady has a wood walking stick and we added a lanyard to it so she can loop it over her shoulder and let it hang while casting/fishing
 

Zak

WFF Supporter
On my ash wood staff I drilled a hole below the grip and run a length of vinyl coated clothesline to a loop that fits on my wading belt. It just hangs in the water behind me when I'm not using it. The coated line helps keeps hooks from fouling in it.
 

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