Pizza

IveofIone

Active Member
WFF Supporter
Sunday I tried something different by making a pizza in a cast iron skillet instead of on a stone or steel. The results were surprising for a first attempt and I'm hopeful I can do as well again.
It went like this. On Sat I started the dough and let it ferment overnight. This resulted in a fragrant soft dough that was highly hydrated. After about 24 hours I punched the dough down a couple of times and let it raise again before finally forming it into shape ready for the pan. In a cold pan I placed some EV olive oil, some semolina flour, Aleppo pepper, garlic, salt and a generous sprinkling of pizza seasoning. This is the magic that really rounds out the flavor of a pizza. The product I buy is from Frontier CO-Op and contains the following: Onion, bell peppers, fennel seed, oregano, garlic, basil, chili peppers, parsley, thyme, marjoram and celery. It is really what separates an average pizza from a really good one.

With everything mixed together and the pan thoroughly coated I added the dough, now pliable, and formed it right out to the edge of the pan. Sauce was applied, again out to the edge of the pan and then cheese that had been cut in to about 3/8'' cubes spread evenly over the entire thing. A little more EV olive oil sprinkled lightly over the cheese and then pepperoni that I had cut fairly thick on top.

I placed the pan on the stove at medium high heat and let it cook for about 8 minutes and then placed the pan in a 500 degree oven and watched it until the cheese started to brown on top. After cooling for a few minutes I used a knife to cut around the perimeter where the sauce, cheese and dough had coalesced into a brown crispy goodness. With that bond broken the pie slid right out with no sticking and displayed a beautifully browned crust on the bottom with browned cheese on top. It was just delicious, almost like a focaccia but with a seasoned crust that was the star of the show.

I have been baking thin crust margherita pizzas so long that I had forgotten how good a thicker crust can be. More research due soon!
 

SquatchinSince86

Totally Unprofessional
Ive, I have been doing pizza in a cast iron for a few months now. Ever since I got the large 18 inch skillet. I heat the pan in the oven as it is coming up to 450. While the oven and pan are heating, I gather my toppings. It's a bit of a rush to get the dough formed and topped on a hot pan but it works. After all the topping are on I switch the oven to broil at 450 to melt the cheese and get a good color on it.

Initial results have been pleasing! Last week I did kale pesto, fresh mozzarella, and bacon. Even the 6 year old was asking for more.

I have been experimenting with different dough recipes. So far the favorite has been the Roberta's but 100% bread flour instead of the 50/50 bread flour and '00' in the original. I let ferment for 2 days in the fridge.
 
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Mark Walker

Active Member
Better half is "gluten free".
I understand, but it's a real PITA! Simply removes too many food options dining together. :(
 

IveofIone

Active Member
WFF Supporter
Anyone making their own sauce? Have a recipe to share? Since I am alone now I have stopped making pizza sauce and have been buying some stuff that is made in Italy and is pretty darned good, not to mention quick and easy. But it comes in a can and there is just no way I can use so much sauce before it goes stale.

The solution? Muffin trays. After I open the can and use it the first time I pour the rest into muffin trays and freeze it. Once frozen I place the tray upside down on a rack and wait until the pucks fall out. Then put them in a plastic bag and return them to the freezer. One puck is usually more than enough for one pizza. On pizza day remove from plastic bag and place in a ramekin to let thaw. No more wasted sauce.
 

Rob Allen

Active Member
Sunday I tried something different by making a pizza in a cast iron skillet instead of on a stone or steel. The results were surprising for a first attempt and I'm hopeful I can do as well again.
It went like this. On Sat I started the dough and let it ferment overnight. This resulted in a fragrant soft dough that was highly hydrated. After about 24 hours I punched the dough down a couple of times and let it raise again before finally forming it into shape ready for the pan. In a cold pan I placed some EV olive oil, some semolina flour, Aleppo pepper, garlic, salt and a generous sprinkling of pizza seasoning. This is the magic that really rounds out the flavor of a pizza. The product I buy is from Frontier CO-Op and contains the following: Onion, bell peppers, fennel seed, oregano, garlic, basil, chili peppers, parsley, thyme, marjoram and celery. It is really what separates an average pizza from a really good one.

With everything mixed together and the pan thoroughly coated I added the dough, now pliable, and formed it right out to the edge of the pan. Sauce was applied, again out to the edge of the pan and then cheese that had been cut in to about 3/8'' cubes spread evenly over the entire thing. A little more EV olive oil sprinkled lightly over the cheese and then pepperoni that I had cut fairly thick on top.

I placed the pan on the stove at medium high heat and let it cook for about 8 minutes and then placed the pan in a 500 degree oven and watched it until the cheese started to brown on top. After cooling for a few minutes I used a knife to cut around the perimeter where the sauce, cheese and dough had coalesced into a brown crispy goodness. With that bond broken the pie slid right out with no sticking and displayed a beautifully browned crust on the bottom with browned cheese on top. It was just delicious, almost like a focaccia but with a seasoned crust that was the star of the show.

I have been baking thin crust margherita pizzas so long that I had forgotten how good a thicker crust can be. More research due soon!

So sauce goes around the outside edge of the crust? Between the crust and edge of the pan?
 

jasmillo

Active Member
WFF Supporter
Anyone making their own sauce? Have a recipe to share? Since I am alone now I have stopped making pizza sauce and have been buying some stuff that is made in Italy and is pretty darned good, not to mention quick and easy. But it comes in a can and there is just no way I can use so much sauce before it goes stale.

The solution? Muffin trays. After I open the can and use it the first time I pour the rest into muffin trays and freeze it. Once frozen I place the tray upside down on a rack and wait until the pucks fall out. Then put them in a plastic bag and return them to the freezer. One puck is usually more than enough for one pizza. On pizza day remove from plastic bag and place in a ramekin to let thaw. No more wasted sauce.
I am not making my own sauce but I have been doing something a little different. Marinated tomato chunks on top of pesto.

From last night. Tasty.


88A49E10-67DF-4ACA-A908-BF16676B1387.jpeg
 

IveofIone

Active Member
WFF Supporter
I am not making my own sauce but I have been doing something a little different. Marinated tomato chunks on top of pesto.

From last night. Tasty.


View attachment 226516
J, for the sake of the newbs on here that haven't quite got pizza dialed in yet, how about telling them what rack in the oven you used and what temp. If you used an oven of course.

Seeing your pizza one thing that could be improved is to buy your pepperoni in stick form and slice it yourself. Slice it at least 1/8'' thick and it will retain more of it's flavor and more of it's meat taste. Those little thin slices that curl up like potato chips and burn on the edges just piss me off.

The crust looks great!
 

quilbilly

Big Time Hater
I make my own sauce....
We grow a lot of tomatoes each year and make the pizza sauce in batches of 5 or 10lbs. of tomatoes at a time, with all the fresh herbs, garlic etc from the garden.
I'll dig up my recipe and post it up in a bit, we like it, and it's fairly simple to make, but it cooks down for a while from raw tomatoes.

Then I freeze the sauce in 6 oz. portions for use on a 12 inch pizza in theory, but mine wind up at about 10" and often we end up using the dough for small calzones at times, which is good also.

I use this for my dough recipe

Make the pizza on a pizza stone on my grill, usually the temp is 600/625 degrees or so...if it's real windy may be 550, but the grill can easily hit 700 however 600 or so seems to work best for me so far...only made a few.
 

jasmillo

Active Member
WFF Supporter
J, for the sake of the newbs on here that haven't quite got pizza dialed in yet, how about telling them what rack in the oven you used and what temp. If you used an oven of course.

Seeing your pizza one thing that could be improved is to buy your pepperoni in stick form and slice it yourself. Slice it at least 1/8'' thick and it will retain more of it's flavor and more of it's meat taste. Those little thin slices that curl up like potato chips and burn on the edges just piss me off.

The crust looks great!
I cook on rack 4 of 7 @ 500 degrees for 16-18 minutes on a stone. I heat the stone for about an hour at that heat.

I agree on the pepperoni, although I do not mind the crispy edges as much. Here is the thing though and I may be drummed off this thread for admitting this; that’s turkey pepperoni :). I am trying to lose some weight, be a bit healthier, etc. so I gave it a shot. Ehh, not the same. Going forward, I’ll just eat the real stuff less often I think.
 

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