What am I tying? A mystery game!

FinLuver

Kicked
It's a topping on the white craft fur or PB wing
I love the rich history of fly tying and reading how fly patterns evolve over time. I'll admit that this one stumped me, even though I had plenty of source materials from which to reference...I just picked the one that only mentioned the fly, but didn't have the fly pattern picture/recipe.

Interesting to note, the pattern didn't have cheeks nor toppings listed in the recipe, until the 1990s; even silver tinsel (tip/tag) crept in at some point. And, when did white thread come into the picture?? Craft Fur is yet another addition to the pattern and overall look of the fly.

Here's something I like to do on occasion when it come to the history of a fly pattern...

Lady Coachman by Walt Johnson

Hook:
#1 - 6, 2x strong
Tread:
Tip:
Fluor. Red (cerise) floss
Tail: Purple hackle fibers, 12-15
Butt: Peacock Herl, rear 1/3
Body: Fluor. Red (cerise) floss
Shoulder: Peacock Herl, front 1/3
Hackle: Fluor. Pink, about 4 turns
Wing: White Polar Bear, sparse. As time goes along will use bucktail
“Designed by Walt Johnson of Seattle, Washington. A good steelhead pattern for murky or off-color water.”
PACIFIC NORTHWEST FLY PATTERNS ~ Patrick's Fly Shop by Roy A. Patrick [1970 - Enlarged Edition]


Hook:
Tread:
Tag:
Flat Silver tinsel with Fluorescent Red floss over
Tail: Cerise hackle fibers
Body: Peacock herl divided by a narrow band of Fluorescent Pink wool
Hackle: Light Fluorescent Pink
Wing: White bucktail
“Walt Johnson Describes his Lady Coachman as, “a very useful companion fly to the ever-popular Royal or Bucktail Coachman. It is a pattern that finds its niche basically when fishing on overcast days or in the late evening. The pink body seems to be attractive to the fish in this subdued light.” The dressing was first tied in 1958.”
STEELHEAD FLY FISHING and FLIES by Trey Combs [1976; 1984 Fifth Printing]


Hook:
Tread:
Red or Black
Tip: Flat silver tinsel with red fluorescent floss over tinsel
Tail: Cerise (pink) hackle fibers
Butt: Peacock Herl
Body: Fluorescent pink floss
Shoulder: Peacock Herl
Hackle: Cerise (pink)
Wing: White bucktail
STEELHEAD FLY TYING MANUAL by Tom Light and Neal Humphrey [1979; 1985 Second Printing]


Hook:
Tread:
Tip:
Flat silver tinsel and cerise floss over tinsel
Tail: Cerise hackle barbs
Body: "Peacock herl, then Fluorescent Pink yarn, then Peacock herl"
Collar: Soft hackle dyed Fluorescent Pink
Wing: Fine White bucktail or a similar fine white hair like rabbit of fox
Cheeks: Kingfisher or substitute
Topping: Golden Pheasant topping
“The Lady Coachman was derived from the popular Royal Coachman by Walt Johnson of Arlington, Washington, in the 1950s for use on the North Fork of the Stillaguamish River. A summer-run pattern, it is particularly useful in fading light as the pinks in this fly appear radiant at dusk.”
FLIES FOR STEELHEAD by Dick Stewart and Farrow Allen [February 1992]


Hook:
Tread:
Tip:
Silver tinsel
Tag: Fl. Red floss
Tail: Cerise hackle fibers
Body: Peacock herl fore and aft, divided by Fl. Pink yarn
Hackle: Light Fl. Pink
Wing: White Polar Bear or similar with sides of Asian Kingfisher rump (or substitute Light Blue hen cape feathers)
Originator: Walt Johnson
Tier: Walt Johnson
STEELHEAD FLIES by John Shewey [2006]


Hook:
Tread:
Tip:
Silver flat tinsel
Tag: Fluorescent Red floss
Tail: Cerise hackle fibers
Body: Peacock herl, divided at midpoint by Fluorescent Pink wool yarn
Hackle: Light Fluorescent Pink
Wing: White bucktail between two light-blue hen neck feathers
“Walt Johnson, 1958
“Tied by Walt Johnson”
CLASSIC STEELHEAD FLIES by John Shewey [2015]
 

DenWor54

Active Member
Here’s a Walt Johnson original and my tie below, I like the light pink wool for the body. A have great success with this fly both summer fish and winter, and a few years back my daughter hooked six winter fish on the fly tied on a 1 1/2 Alec Jackson hook and to add it was here first go at winter steelheading Walt would have been proud of her. 5B38D332-2E1B-495C-8DDF-D433D425A724.jpeg
 

FinLuver

Kicked
Here’s a Walt Johnson original and my tie below, I like the light pink wool for the body. A have great success with this fly both summer fish and winter, and a few years back my daughter hooked six winter fish on the fly tied on a 1 1/2 Alec Jackson hook and to add it was here first go at winter steelheading Walt would have been proud of her. View attachment 227054
Den
Thank you for sharing this pattern and an original fly...what a treasure and fishing memory.
 

SilverFly

Active Member
Beautiful fly Dennis. A pattern worthy of that nice patch of PB you have. I'm down to a couple of remnants my Dad used for coho flies back in the 60's. That stuff is gold.
 

DenWor54

Active Member
I love the rich history of fly tying and reading how fly patterns evolve over time. I'll admit that this one stumped me, even though I had plenty of source materials from which to reference...I just picked the one that only mentioned the fly, but didn't have the fly pattern picture/recipe.

Interesting to note, the pattern didn't have cheeks nor toppings listed in the recipe, until the 1990s; even silver tinsel (tip/tag) crept in at some point. And, when did white thread come into the picture?? Craft Fur is yet another addition to the pattern and overall look of the fly.

Here's something I like to do on occasion when it come to the history of a fly pattern...

Lady Coachman by Walt Johnson

Hook:
#1 - 6, 2x strong
Tread:
Tip:
Fluor. Red (cerise) floss
Tail: Purple hackle fibers, 12-15
Butt: Peacock Herl, rear 1/3
Body: Fluor. Red (cerise) floss
Shoulder: Peacock Herl, front 1/3
Hackle: Fluor. Pink, about 4 turns
Wing: White Polar Bear, sparse. As time goes along will use bucktail
“Designed by Walt Johnson of Seattle, Washington. A good steelhead pattern for murky or off-color water.”
PACIFIC NORTHWEST FLY PATTERNS ~ Patrick's Fly Shop by Roy A. Patrick [1970 - Enlarged Edition]


Hook:
Tread:
Tag:
Flat Silver tinsel with Fluorescent Red floss over
Tail: Cerise hackle fibers
Body: Peacock herl divided by a narrow band of Fluorescent Pink wool
Hackle: Light Fluorescent Pink
Wing: White bucktail
“Walt Johnson Describes his Lady Coachman as, “a very useful companion fly to the ever-popular Royal or Bucktail Coachman. It is a pattern that finds its niche basically when fishing on overcast days or in the late evening. The pink body seems to be attractive to the fish in this subdued light.” The dressing was first tied in 1958.”
STEELHEAD FLY FISHING and FLIES by Trey Combs [1976; 1984 Fifth Printing]


Hook:
Tread:
Red or Black
Tip: Flat silver tinsel with red fluorescent floss over tinsel
Tail: Cerise (pink) hackle fibers
Butt: Peacock Herl
Body: Fluorescent pink floss
Shoulder: Peacock Herl
Hackle: Cerise (pink)
Wing: White bucktail
STEELHEAD FLY TYING MANUAL by Tom Light and Neal Humphrey [1979; 1985 Second Printing]


Hook:
Tread:
Tip:
Flat silver tinsel and cerise floss over tinsel
Tail: Cerise hackle barbs
Body: "Peacock herl, then Fluorescent Pink yarn, then Peacock herl"
Collar: Soft hackle dyed Fluorescent Pink
Wing: Fine White bucktail or a similar fine white hair like rabbit of fox
Cheeks: Kingfisher or substitute
Topping: Golden Pheasant topping
“The Lady Coachman was derived from the popular Royal Coachman by Walt Johnson of Arlington, Washington, in the 1950s for use on the North Fork of the Stillaguamish River. A summer-run pattern, it is particularly useful in fading light as the pinks in this fly appear radiant at dusk.”
FLIES FOR STEELHEAD by Dick Stewart and Farrow Allen [February 1992]


Hook:
Tread:
Tip:
Silver tinsel
Tag: Fl. Red floss
Tail: Cerise hackle fibers
Body: Peacock herl fore and aft, divided by Fl. Pink yarn
Hackle: Light Fl. Pink
Wing: White Polar Bear or similar with sides of Asian Kingfisher rump (or substitute Light Blue hen cape feathers)
Originator: Walt Johnson
Tier: Walt Johnson
STEELHEAD FLIES by John Shewey [2006]


Hook:
Tread:
Tip:
Silver flat tinsel
Tag: Fluorescent Red floss
Tail: Cerise hackle fibers
Body: Peacock herl, divided at midpoint by Fluorescent Pink wool yarn
Hackle: Light Fluorescent Pink
Wing: White bucktail between two light-blue hen neck feathers
“Walt Johnson, 1958
“Tied by Walt Johnson”
CLASSIC STEELHEAD FLIES by John Shewey [2015]
Hey Finluver,
Thanks for posting the different recipes,Walt used a lot of if I remember correctly was flyfur which was the same as craft fur. I have tied the fly with craft fur, arctic fox and PB I don’t think it maters. The one thing from a tier and fishing perspective is this is a good fly for low light conditions which goes against the bright fly bright day theory. I remember Walt telling me how he had great success on the Wenatchee when the sun was off the water in the evening with this pattern. This fly also has produced well for me when fish are just entering in tidewater in the winter in low light.
 

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