solar fluctuations affecting rainbow trout

cabezon

Sculpin Enterprises
WFF Supporter
Sorry, Dan, but much ado about nothing, IMO. It has long been known that salmonids (and other fishes) can orient / migrate using magnetic cues. We even know where the cells are located in the nose of rainbow trout that respond to magnetic cues (see Magnetic Cells Give Sense of Direction to Fish). The authors in the paper that you cite argue that because solar activity impacts the Earth's magnetic field, a fish's orientation may also be impacted. I guess that this will add to the litany of excuses for a bad day of fishing - "sunspot activity".
Steve
 
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Brian Miller

Be vewy vewy qwiet, I'm hunting Cutthwoat Twout
WFF Supporter
Sorry, Dan, but much ado about nothing, IMO. It has long been known that salmonids (and other fishes) can orient / migrate using magnetic cues. We even know where the cells are located in the nose of rainbow trout that respond to magnetic cues (see Magnetic Cells Give Sense of Direction to Fish).
I'd heard of this before also. I know I don't know jack but with the North magnetic pole moving northward at an average rate of 10 kilometers per year, a Steelhead migrating from the Wynoochee 2200 miles to the Aleutians where it was tagged and back isn't a rather significant navigational achievement even without solar activity?
 

Old Man

A very Old Man
WFF Supporter
If Rainbow trout are attracted to magnets, well hell just cast out a magnet to catch them. You wouldn't even need a hook of any kind.:confused:
 

cabezon

Sculpin Enterprises
WFF Supporter
I'd heard of this before also. I know I don't know jack but with the North magnetic pole moving northward at an average rate of 10 kilometers per year, a Steelhead migrating from the Wynoochee 2200 miles to the Aleutians where it was tagged and back isn't a rather significant navigational achievement even without solar activity?
Hi Brian,
Over the scale of the overall multi-year migration of that steelhead, the yearly drift of magnetic north is simply noise. And over a single day (e.g., homing by a homing pigeon), the yearly drift is too little. Magnetic orientation is great over longer distances, even between lake and spawning stream. When you add in olfaction, the high level of site-fidelity evinced by salmonids and other fishes (e.g., eels) is understandable.
Steve
 

rawalker

Active Member
Magnetite beads!!! That's the ticket.
Then magnetize the hook, mount the bead with the polarity reversed so it repels itself!
My goal would be to confuse the trout, so they would overlook my bad casting, poor fly tying and general lack of skill!
 

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