What makes you a "local"?

rotato

Active Member
There was an interesting article in the NY Times about localism in the world of surfing. The “locals only “ concept was conceived by an Southern California dude and was implemented to reinforce racist ideals.

the Internet has added a lot of extra fishers at south sound beaches but in general they are quite nice people.
 

Charles Sullivan

ignoring Rob Allen and Generic
I never would want to be a local. I've never really been from where I lived. Being a local or any of that nativist buillshit is silly. I prefer just to treat humans as humans regardless of where they are from. Being born in a location or living in a location for a given period of time should afford you no greater privilege.
Whenever someone uses their heritage, birthplace etc. as a reason for respect I turn off and lose all respect for that person immediately. I'm not a fan of birthrights or nativism.

Go Sox,
cds
 

Greg Armstrong

Active Member
WFF Supporter
Fact is... if you were born on this spinning orb called planet Earth, you’re a local.
Its those dudes from outer space that are coming to attack us (and “our” beaches) that don’t have a clue what they’ve got coming to them!
 

Chucker

Chucking a dead parrot on a piece of string!
You’re not a local unless your grandparents were born local; At least that’s what I was told in the town in England where I used to live. So I left, and came here, and now i’m as local as I need to be!
 

Steve Saville

Active Member
WFF Supporter
You’re not a local unless your grandparents were born local; At least that’s what I was told in the town in England where I used to live. So I left, and came here, and now i’m as local as I need to be!
Well, when my grandchildren head off to high school, they will be sixth generation at that school. How's that for local?
 

Salmo_g

Well-Known Member
WFF Supporter
If you weren't fishing that beach before 1970 you're just a newbie. Local or distant, a newbie just the same. Logically, if you have to drive to get there, how can you possibly be a "local?"
 

JayB

Active Member
The amount of respect I have for someone is almost always inversely proportional to the extent that they confuse a characteristic they were born with for a personal achievement. That's been particularly true with people that take pride in being a "local." But I guess that's the sort of thing you'd take pride in if you couldn't take pride in anything else.
 

East Coaster

Active Member
While I agree that there is often a tendency to use "local" status to claim some sort of entitlement, there is a flip side, which is when "localism" promotes stewardship (not ownership). "Local" anglers are more likely to serve as watchdogs, being able to identify and react to changes in the condition of the fishery. They may be more likely to participate in town planning/zoning meetings and help influence local ordinances that might be detrimental to the resource. They should be (although we all know there are exceptions) less likely to trash a place than a casual visitor (and maybe more likely to call the local police if they see someone breaking the rules).

In that respect, having a core group of locals for a given beach or stream can be a benefit. And to clarify, by this definition, "local" has less to do with proximity (though that plays a role) than it has to do with how frequently they visit and how passionate the anglers are about that particular place . I can imagine a lot of folks posting here that live close to Seattle, but spend the majority of time fishing south Sound beaches, would qualify as "locals" (maybe "regulars" is a better term for them) in terms of stewardship. Just a thought......
 

Ragtimewilly

Active Member
While I agree that there is often a tendency to use "local" status to claim some sort of entitlement, there is a flip side, which is when "localism" promotes stewardship (not ownership). "Local" anglers are more likely to serve as watchdogs, being able to identify and react to changes in the condition of the fishery. They may be more likely to participate in town planning/zoning meetings and help influence local ordinances that might be detrimental to the resource. They should be (although we all know there are exceptions) less likely to trash a place than a casual visitor (and maybe more likely to call the local police if they see someone breaking the rules).

In that respect, having a core group of locals for a given beach or stream can be a benefit. And to clarify, by this definition, "local" has less to do with proximity (though that plays a role) than it has to do with how frequently they visit and how passionate the anglers are about that particular place . I can imagine a lot of folks posting here that live close to Seattle, but spend the majority of time fishing south Sound beaches, would qualify as "locals" (maybe "regulars" is a better term for them) in terms of stewardship. Just a thought......
I like the idea of this, I agree stewardship seems more significant than ones claim to being local.

I will say, where I grew up I’d often see people misuse land and hunt/fish with disregard for laws or the sustainability of the animals they were going after. Some of this I attributed to a sense of entitlement. We’d generally let folks hunt or fish on our property if they were respectful.
 

GOTY

6x Puget Sound Steelhead Guide of the Year
I pay taxes year round (i.e. not a few days of sales/hotel/etc tax) that go towards the resource in one form or another. Therefore I'm a local.

Now get out of my way and let me fish that piece of water you damn foreigners.
 

wadin' boot

Donny, you're out of your element...
WFF Supporter
A beach I fish a lot and do not consider myself a local is frequently also fished by "Joe" who used to have a smaller boat. When Joe was in his smaller boat, he would fish REALLY close to me anchored up in the Kayak. he'd troll spinners, 50 yards of line back and forth and back and forth. Told me all kinds of local stories about his 50 plus fish days while his wake rocks the spot and spooks anything at all. Then asks, always, if I have caught any, and if there are any bulls around. He got a bigger boat so he can't reliably get in to the shallow water any more. He thinks his bigger boat scares the fish, and I think he is right. Joe kinda drives me nuts, I hope he gets an even bigger boat.
 

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