Wading Boots Suggestions?

jasmillo

Active Member
WFF Supporter
I bought a pair of Simms Fly Weight boots about a month and half ago and love them so far. I have only worn them in the salt over 8 trips but they are the most comfortable wading boot I have ever owned. I also own the Simms Freestones and Tributaries and as @Stonefish mentioned, they are clunky. The Tributaries durability was also horrible (actually at Simms now being repaired).

I cannot say much about the durability yet but the feel is like a traditional light hiker versus any wading boot I have ever worn. For me, you just have more feel for the bottom and are a bit more nimble.
 

Shad

Active Member
I am currently wearing Korkers, but they're the ~$200 model. (May I say it's usually worth spending the extra $50 to get the best- they have usually proven to last at least twice as long as even slightly less expensive models in my experience.)

I like them a lot so far. I love the interchangeable soles. You can roll on the rubber soles all day in a lot of places, but the felt soles pack in super light for the "slicker" wading situations. They're light and comfortable.

One thing I don't love is that little rocks can sneak into the cracks between the sole surface and the boot bottom. Annoying, but thankfully not too common.

We'll see how long they last. I've had them for about 6 months of moderate-heavy use so far, and they are holding up well. I have owned lots of boots, and I consider the Simms Guide boots the gold standard for longevity so far, but they are relatively heavy and can make a long hike that much longer.

I'm often disappointed by boots (and waders for that matter), but then, we do ask an awful lot of our wading gear. Water defeats anything eventually; usually faster than I'd like. I consider 2 years without serious issues pretty solid. Some seem to get 10 years out of cheap stuff. I don't know how....
 
I bought a pair of Simms Fly Weight boots about a month and half ago and love them so far. I have only worn them in the salt over 8 trips but they are the most comfortable wading boot I have ever owned. I also own the Simms Freestones and Tributaries and as @Stonefish mentioned, they are clunky. The Tributaries durability was also horrible (actually at Simms now being repaired).

I cannot say much about the durability yet but the feel is like a traditional light hiker versus any wading boot I have ever worn. For me, you just have more feel for the bottom and are a bit more nimble.
This is where it would really be nice to have a local place with a selection... They sound great but I need something that will work with a heavy wool sock + 4mm neoprene and a thinner lighter boot sounds like it could be restrictive, what do you think?
 

wetswinger

Active Member
Has anybody tried using modern hiking boots that aren’t fishing pacific. They all seem to have plenty of drainage and are far less expensive. Never thought wading boots worked all that well. As for spikes, just use hex- headed sheet metal screws. Work great, cost nothing. My boots have been reglued a million times and still only get two or three years out of them with easy beach use. Kind a tired of it...
 
Has anybody tried using modern hiking boots that aren’t fishing pacific. They all seem to have plenty of drainage and are far less expensive. Never thought wading boots worked all that well. As for spikes, just use hex- headed sheet metal screws. Work great, cost nothing. My boots have been reglued a million times and still only get two or three years out of them with easy beach use. Kind a tired of it...
Any regular cheap shoes/boots I have waded in all tend to separate where the sole is glued to the shoe which I'm hoping to overcome by buying boots specifically for wading, at least for a longer period of time. I wish stitch down soles were not so uncommon, never had one of them separate.
 

Bagman

Active Member
What size are you looking for? I have a pair of Simms size 12 that I will let you have for a good price, not many miles on them as they are too small for me.
 

Speyrod GB

Active Member
I have the Simms Freestone rubber soles. I used the aluminum stars until they wore out and fell out. I now have lil studs in them. They work fairly well.

I also have a pair of Korkers Greenbacks with felt and rubber soles. I am on my second pair of felts. They were supposed to be a back up pair. They get used quite a bit. I bought them one sized larger than my normal shoe and they fit great. They are much lighter than the Simms.

Just my .02.
 
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I have the Simms Freestone rubber soles. I used the aluminum stars until they wore out and fell out. I now have lil studs in them. They work fairly well.

I also have a pair of Korkers Greenbacks with felt and rubber soles. I am on my second pair of felts. They were supposed to be a back up pair. They get used quit a bit. I bought them one sized larger than my normal shoe and they fit great. They are much lighter than the Simms.

Just my .02.
How do you feel about the longevity of Korkers? not just the greenbacks but their tread system. I will admit I find the idea intriguing but it seems like a very possible failure point for convenience, kind of like the BOA lace system. Comfort and convenience is nice but to me durability > comfort/convenience, within reason. If I'm wrong please enlighten me, I'd hate to miss out on something that was truly great because I'm scared of new stuff. I do like that they offer a 1 year "unwavering, 100% guarantee".
 

jasmillo

Active Member
WFF Supporter
This is where it would really be nice to have a local place with a selection... They sound great but I need something that will work with a heavy wool sock + 4mm neoprene and a thinner lighter boot sounds like it could be restrictive, what do you think?
Tough question to answer because everyone’s feet are different. It might be worth the 1 hour trip to try on a few things. For me, they fit like normal wading boots.
 

chief

Active Member
I bought a pair of Simms Fly Weight boots about a month and half ago and love them so far. I have only worn them in the salt over 8 trips but they are the most comfortable wading boot I have ever owned. I also own the Simms Freestones and Tributaries and as @Stonefish mentioned, they are clunky. The Tributaries durability was also horrible (actually at Simms now being repaired).

I cannot say much about the durability yet but the feel is like a traditional light hiker versus any wading boot I have ever worn. For me, you just have more feel for the bottom and are a bit more nimble.
I agree with this review. I have been using the Simms Fly Weight boots since last spring, and they are the best fitting wading boots I have ever owned. They fit like a lightweight hiking boot, and the rubber is pretty grippy. I have not felt a need to add studs, but I don't wade aggressively anymore. I can't speak to there longevity, having only used them for one season, but they seem to be well made. I would recommend them.
 

Greg Price

Love da little fishies
How do you feel about the longevity of Korkers? not just the greenbacks but their tread system. I will admit I find the idea intriguing but it seems like a very possible failure point for convenience, kind of like the BOA lace system. Comfort and convenience is nice but to me durability > comfort/convenience, within reason. If I'm wrong please enlighten me, I'd hate to miss out on something that was truly great because I'm scared of new stuff. I do like that they offer a 1 year "unwavering, 100% guarantee".
Rusty, I am hell on Boots. I wet Wade on slippery baseball to basketball size rocks all sumnmer, then dunk them in salt sfew months a year on beaches. I love my Korkers with boa laces. Lightweght, but durable. Will buy my 3rd pair soon. This pair at least ,3 years old. Boa had excellent customer service. I could not remove laces, so they paid to have my boot sent to them. They installed new laced and rachet knob free ok f charge and had boots back in less than a week. I highly recommend them. Easy to put on and do not loosen up like laces. Sometimes I have to use a scree driver to pry open after freezing my fingers in wind rain saltwater, kind of like when I was a kid and could not get my zipper down to pee at ski lodge urinal. Finally, I love the interchangable soles. Have had a few studded felts, excellent for wet trees and slimey rocks, but death on non slime, flat rocks. Might have to try the bars. Current grn soles super easy on off
 

Speyrod GB

Active Member
I've only had the Korkers for about a year and a half. They have seen some use. Rock Creek and the Madison are slippery rivers. I think a pair of felts per summer is about right. You can wire brush the felts to extend the use. the rest of the boot has held up all. Way better than generation 1 of the Korkers. I have no experience with the BOA lace system so I can't speak to that. Hopefully that helps.
 

Old406Kid

Active Member
How do you feel about the longevity of Korkers? not just the greenbacks but their tread system. I will admit I find the idea intriguing but it seems like a very possible failure point for convenience, kind of like the BOA lace system. Comfort and convenience is nice but to me durability > comfort/convenience, within reason. If I'm wrong please enlighten me, I'd hate to miss out on something that was truly great because I'm scared of new stuff. I do like that they offer a 1 year "unwavering, 100% guarantee".
If I fish enough to wear out soles just call me a happy camper. :D
They're relatively inexpensive especially when compared to wearing out a nonremoveable sole on other boots.
 

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