Shhhhhh...

SARG950

Active Member
Being "sort of" retired, I'll admit I tune in to this website almost daily, checking for deals, flies, and especially reports. So when I zero in on a thread that's clearly a fishing report, it gnaws on me when the author omits the body of water, likely with intent... While the reasons may escape even the wildest of comprehensive understanding, is there any angling soul out there who is truly fearful of having a "secret waterhole" invaded by the masses and fished to oblivion? Everyone AND their mothers continue to pound Pass and Lone; those two lakes are obviously no secret and continue to produce. And like the Seattle City Attorneys' Office and the KC Prosecutors' Office, we WFF members pretty much practice catch-and-release (but not nearly to the degree of the aforementioned circus clowns).

So what is it about hesitating to name the body of water where you've been dunking flies? Inquiring minds want to know...
 

Mark Mercer

Member
Most well known lakes, no problem, even a few over populated beaches are OK but most streams, little known beaches and small not well known lakes should never be mentioned online imo. Many of us older folks have seen them over run with guides and way too many people, when once they were nice quiet places to go fish.
 
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Snopro

Active Member
Everyone AND their mothers continue to pound Pass and Lone; those two lakes are obviously no secret and continue to produce. ).

So what is it about hesitating to name the body of water where you've been dunking flies? Inquiring minds want to know...
So they don't become like Pass and Lone? It's not just about the quality of the fishing. Quality of the experience is at least equal in importance. For me the quality of the experience is directly related to the number of people I see.

I don't think I've ever posted a TR on here. I'll try and change that this season. If it's a lake like Pass, Lone, Lenice, Potholes or the Columbia, l'll name it. Most likely I'll be fishing somewhere not to be named.
 

troutfly1

Member
I've been fishing since the early 70s, almost 50 years by my reckoning. I doubt there is much that is "secret" or "uncrowded" anymore unless you fly in, boat in, drive in or hike in a good distance from any paved road. Even then its hard to be alone.
 

Ian Horning

Powerbait Entomologist
To answer your first question: Yes. Absolutely.

To answer the second: A). There's no secrets but there are lesser known fisheries and places that greatly benefit from the lack of crowds and intense angling pressure. We've got a ton of gorgeous streams that flow through gorgeous places in this state. However, so many of these places are crowded, or fished enough to the point where it detracts from the overall experience of being there in one way or another.

B). WFF is an internet website with viewers around the country and state. I don't worry about 95% of the members of WFF ruining fishing spots. Most of the members here seem very ethical and sporting in their practices and I would happily fish with or around them. It's the 5% plus all the non-members (or lurkers) that I don't know that might blow up a spot on social media, mishandle fish or even poach them that I don't want to key in on sensitive spots.

C). The only positive thing that comes from more angling pressure (in a perfect world) is that more people care about the water and fish that the system holds. Stakeholders are (usually) good for fisheries. But, more pressure comes with a whole set of detriments to fisheries as well.

Disclaimer: There are some spots that can withstand angling pressure and additional notoriety in the state. Our managed lakes and very few super-producers of trout streams are some of them. "X creek" that flows through pristine wilderness and has a small number of fish is not one of them. Neither is "X river" where 70% of the point of fishing said river over the others is to be immersed in the solitude and beauty that the lack of crowds provides. Said river could just as easily be heavily guided and have a giant resort town associated with it...but, it's purpose is to be wilderness or close to it. We don't have many places like that left in the state.
 

jasmillo

Active Member
WFF Supporter
I agree there are few, if any secrets spots left. There is secret production though. If you report good fishing with a location, it will get additional pressure. If you named the most popular coho beach in the sound in a report where you talk about good numbers, that beach will have significantly more anglers on it the next day. It’s about number of anglers not the spot.

Everyone has google maps and knows hard to reach lakes, streams and beaches exist. 95% of those people are to lazy to check them out unless someone has announced to the world that it’s worth the effort.
 

FinLuver

Kicked
Everyone has google maps and knows hard to reach lakes, streams and beaches exist. 95% of those people are to lazy to check them out unless someone has announced to the world that it’s worth the effort.
Time to use “reverse psychology “ on that 95% then.
Make a false report to clear out the masses in the really good spots. ;)
 

IveofIone

Active Member
WFF Supporter
Check the members register in the right hand column to get some idea of why we don't like to blab. Usually the number of guest watching outnumber the members but about 2:1, sometimes more. Many of those 'guest' are looking for any kernel of information they can can glean by not having to do any actual work. Loose lips kill trout and a dead trout is of absolutely no use to most of us.

As far as secret spots there are still a lot of lakes that may not be secret but get very little use and sometimes almost none after the first month of the season. These are general regs lakes that often have a surprising fish population in them but are ignored by fly fishermen. Instead of fishing a Chopaka with 100 other guys there might be 2 or 3 of us that have a lake all to ourselves and have 30 fish days. And in the fall after hunting season opens? Oh, my goodness! The fishing in some of these obscure lakes is just exhilarating. On one lake last fall I met a couple that had come all the way from Nevada to fish a little local lake that got almost no attention. They were rewarded with fish up to 24''.

If I published the name of that lake or others, thousands of people would see it and some would come, others would discuss it and the word would spread. As a charter member of the Obscure Lakes Program I'll keep researching little known waters but I'm not going to blab.
 

jasmillo

Active Member
WFF Supporter
Time to use “reverse psychology “ on that 95% then.
Make a false report to clear out the masses in the really good spots. ;)
Stop giving away trade secrets.

Btw, in works the other way too. I often post a great report with pics and location to draw the masses to horrible water, with the hopes being skunked constantly will push them to golf.

Lesson here:

1DE484C2-FB44-4F91-8E8F-A0D31B0FCF8A.jpeg
 

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