Knee replacement feedback? Update 3-22

BullerRiver1

Active Member
A couple of things occurred to me after my post. One had to do with the type of prosthesis you're fitted with. It's my layman's understanding that there are "glue in" and "knitting ones". I'll let the professionals put the correct names to them. My basic understanding is the "glued" ones come on line pretty quickly while the other ones have to knit into the knee tissue for stability. I didn't know till after surgery that I have the "knitted" variety. Hence my recovery required more time.

As for knowing when you'll be able to wade fish again that depends on how stable and strong your knee becomes. Sounds pretty obvious but the point is you'll know when you can trust it. This isn't a place to practice, "no pain, no gain." If there's a bit of discomfort that's part of the recovery. After all as a doctor friend observed, "they cut you knee off!" Getting the joint to have a good range of motion requires diligence and reduced swelling. Aggravation would not be conducive.

In sum I'm really glad I had mine done. It's been a problem since junior high football, 57 years ago. Keep us informed of your progress or if you need a pep talk.

Gary
Thanks, will do.
 

RobM

New Member
I had a total knee replacement in November 2018 at age 58. I was in good shape in a hobbled sort of way going into surgery (I went steelheading on the John Day the day before surgery). Like others have said, be super diligent in PT. It is kind of an all day thing doing the exercises. Exercise, ice/elevate, rest a bit, and then repeat. The PT is painful and you need painkillers to endure it. I had a PT who made house calls. That was great. It saved time, made it easy on my family, and let me expend my energy on exercise not transport.

I hit the crossover point in about 6 weeks (feeling better and able to do more than pre-surgery). I was back steelheading in late January and easy run skiing in March.

Put in the work and you are going to love it. Good luck!
 

Krusty

Huge Erect Member
WFF Supporter
I had a total knee replacement in November 2018 at age 58. I was in good shape in a hobbled sort of way going into surgery (I went steelheading on the John Day the day before surgery). Like others have said, be super diligent in PT. It is kind of an all day thing doing the exercises. Exercise, ice/elevate, rest a bit, and then repeat. The PT is painful and you need painkillers to endure it. I had a PT who made house calls. That was great. It saved time, made it easy on my family, and let me expend my energy on exercise not transport.

I hit the crossover point in about 6 weeks (feeling better and able to do more than pre-surgery). I was back steelheading in late January and easy run skiing in March.

Put in the work and you are going to love it. Good luck!
Good point about ice. Investing in a circulating cold wrap machine will really speed your recovery. Plus you can use it for less severe injuries in the future.
 

Riogrande King

Active Member
WFF Supporter
Good point about ice. Investing in a circulating cold wrap machine will really speed your recovery. Plus you can use it for less severe injuries in the future.
Yes ! Whoever invented these things deserves a Nobel Prize in medicine. I was able to rent one. By all means hunt one down.
 

NCL

Active Member
I have had both knees replaced, right in May 2008 and left in January 2011. Probably the worst part of the experience in terns of pain is the first couple of days. My Doctor insisted on PT from the outset, they had me up and walking the very first day and in a knee bending machine the second day. I started PT the first week and went 3 days a week for 6 weeks. Off the walker after two weeks and off crutches after 4 weeks, most of which time was because of fear of falling. I was driving after 4 weeks when I had the right side done. I will second the ice, I had a machine that circulated ice water from a cooler for the first surgery recovery, but for some reason the Doctor did not prescribe it the second time. The odd thing was the initial recovery after the second surgery was slower (it took me two days to walk the hall and the Therapist told me that they were considering not releasing me after the first attempt), where as the first surgery it took 13 weeks to return to work the second time I was only out 8 weeks. I asked the Therapist about that and she said they often see a faster recovery on the second surgery but they do not know why. Overall the experience and recovery was not bad in my case.
 

flybill

Purveyor of fine hackle, wine & cigars!
WFF Supporter
The circulating wrap machine is cool. My buddy rented one when he had his first knee replaced. No idea how much they cost! I wish I had one now, my right knee fucking hurts right now this morning!
 

dp

~El Pescador
great thread as I am in line for a replacement this Fall. I have all spring, summer and a little Fall before I take the plunge.
this is a timely and informative thread - thanks!
 

BullerRiver1

Active Member
great thread as I am in line for a replacement this Fall. I have all spring, summer and a little Fall before I take the plunge.
this is a timely and informative thread - thanks!
Brothers in suffering! I'll post my experiences after the surgery - maybe you'l find it informative.
Rick
 

JamesRPL+

Active Member
1 important question I wish I had asked was if the surgeon used a tourniquet or femoral artery block to control bleeding. Recovery time will rely heavily on this choice.
 

Red64

Member
My 2 cents; I have had 5 knee surgeries between Rt and Lt knees. I am delaying replacement surgery on the right knee (the worst one) until I fish Alaska. Recently lost 23 lbs and spending more time at the gym doing knee exercises and my knees are feeling better. My one main piece of advise would be do everything your surgeon says to do and go to PT religiously. PT might be painful at the start but it will get easier and help you in the long run. Good luck!
 

Jamie Wilson

Active Member
WFF Supporter
A guy I know just had it done around Jan 1 or so. It was pretty extensive compared to others I have seen - my wife's replacement as well. He is slacking on the PT. I got in his grill the other day and he just kinda blew me off. He's making a big mistake - like why even do it if your intent was not to improve the knee. Time will tell - but I'm certain he is screwing up big time.
I have a titanium hip - works pretty good
 

Shawn Seeger

(aka. wabowhunter)
WFF Supporter
First, when did you first do major damage happen to the knew being replaced? Mine was when I was 18 (downhill accident) and I blew it up 4 more times before 30. So didn't a lot of life favoring it (this adds to a good PT recovery, relating your brain to trust the new knee).

I had my knee replaced at age 52.5 (Jan 4 2015) and was hiking in and out of Lenice in March 1 st for 2.5 weeks. My buddies helped get my Walker Bay in and out. And I offered my knee per doctor/PT staff. It had been the most life returning thing I have done.

Start doing a lot of leg exercises now especially in the replacement leg, you will literally lose 50% of muscle in the day if surgery due to atrophy, so build it up now.

Find the best PT person in your area, explain your lifestyle needs and WANTS. Do the work! Start ahead of the pain, with meds and ice!!... DON'T overdue the PT!! Tell them you want to be able to kneel in your knew after surgery/PT, this changes the program. Get a bike trainer, exercise bike or something similar it really helps on recovery. You must likely will not be a runner after the replacement and will be discourage from jumping on it to much.

Know that there will be pain after your recovery, just different. Muscular and nerve firing but that is normal, remember you probably have been babying it for some time some three muscles have to be retained.

I wade every summer, spend time wading in Alaska, and you muscles will ache a bit but will be fine.

It is totally worth it!!!
 

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