Proper Dowel for Rod Repair

wetswinger

Active Member
Broke my rod to day trying to clear a snag. Reached above the handle to get more leverage and it broke in my hand. Stupid, I know better! Its a graphite blank that broke cleanly about 14" above the handle. Whats the best material to use for a dowel? I read to go buy a crappy rod from Goodwill and chop it up or to use a wooden dowel hand tapered. What do you think? Is it a must to thread wrap the repair area? Thanks in advance, Dan.
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cmann886

Active Member
The action of the repaired rod is going to be so much different, I would contact the manufacture and try to purchase a new butt section of the rod. I don't think you would like the results of using a wooden dowel to repair the break.

What length wt. rod is it that you are trying to repair? at 14" above the handle, it is going to really change the rods performance regardless of how you try to fix it.

Also, have you checked for micro cracks above and below where the rod broke? I would be concerned about damage to the blank above and below the broken section.

Is it a must to thread wrap the repair area? maybe not but it didn't work for me when I did not. I have only tried to repair one broken rod, a plunking rod. I used a dowel and tried to only glue the dowel to the blank and not reinforce the break with thread. It lasted for exactly one cast before broke so bad that it was no longer usable for anything other than a stake in the garden.
 

wetswinger

Active Member
It’s 11’2”. It has spigot ferrules that I am trying to replicate. I will need to trim off about 1” total to clean it up. It’s an older no name model but I want to give this a try before I pitch it out.
 

rawalker

Active Member
I would try finding a cheap glass or graphite rod to make the repair. That would affect the action less than a solid wood dowel but it is certainly going to feel different no matter what you use.
And yes, you really do need to wrap the broken area as there are almost certainly weaknesses there that will fail immediately as cmann886 stated above.
 

Rob Allen

Active Member
Broke my rod to day trying to clear a snag. Reached above the handle to get more leverage and it broke in my hand. Stupid, I know better! Its a graphite blank that broke cleanly about 14" above the handle. Whats the best material to use for a dowel? I read to go buy a crappy rod from Goodwill and chop it up or to use a wooden dowel hand tapered. What do you think? Is it a must to thread wrap the repair area? Thanks in advance, Dan.
View attachment 227492

Best way to fix it..

1. Find a cheap rod something with thick walls.
Make a piece out of it that fits inside both pieces, double layers if you can manage it.
Epoxy it all together.

Find fiberglass twine and wrap the whole area covering the break and extending beyond both ends of your plug, epoxy that.
Then sand it smooth and wrap with rod wrapping thread and finish.
 

Chucker

Chucking a dead parrot on a piece of string!
Don’t even try using a wooden dowel. It’s a waste of time and effort. Find a rod section that is a similar profile to the broken part, sand the outside of that and the inside of the blank with coarse sandpaper to make epoxy stick. You want at least 12”. I have tapered the ends of the piece to try to make them more flexible at times. Not sure it helps much, but it doesn’t hurt.

Spiral wrap up and down over the break with unwaxed Kevlar thread, then epoxy. If you do it right, the repair is stronger than the rod was to start with.
 

PhilR

Active Member
I broke the tip on my 10 weight. Repaired it with an inner splint using an ultralight spinning rod, and wrapped the repair with gel spun thread before epoxy. Broke it again on a bonefish. Couldn't find anything small enough, and flexible, so I said screw it and used a drill bit for the splint. sanded the corners round, and shoved it up there with epoxy. I wrapped each end of the break with gel spun again, but I didn't have any faith in repair wraps that are parallel to the break, so I used some minnow tubing as a sleeve over the break. The epoxy, and it hasn't broken again yet. Maybe when I actually catch a 10 wt fish, but it's a $75 used cabelas rod, so not the end of the world if the repair doesn't hold.
 

Salmo_g

Well-Known Member
WFF Supporter
What Rob Allen posted. I've made "ferrules" to fix breaks such as you describe. And just like ferrules, the blank must be wrapped on both sides of the break. I haven't used the fiberglass twine and epoxy that Rob suggests, just nylon thread with varnish over. It holds. Oh, and 2 pieces of rod sections, doubled up like Rob said. It makes for a much stronger ferrule.

This repair will modify the rod action. You won't know if you'll still like it until after you try it.
 

herkileez

Active Member
WFF Supporter
I have repaired several broken rods. This one looks like you'll need to trim each end to get clean, un-splintered ends. See if you can scrounge a broken fiberglass rod section, for the splice sleeve, from a local rod shop. (It's important to use fiberglass, as it's more flexible than graphite, and will impede the rods' action less.) You'll want the sleeve on the outside of the blank, with 3" of overlap on each end (6" o/all length) Sand a bevel on each end of the splice section to make the transition less abrupt. Depending on how much you have to trim off the blank ends, the lower section may be loose inside the sleeve. You can take up the slack by spiraling a strand of thread up this section before epoxying. I would use Rod-bond epoxy, as it's more flexible (and less brittle) than regular epoxy. Once the splice epoxy has set, I would wrap thread up and onto the join, then coat with Flexcoat or Threadmaster. The splice will either work, or it won't...but the attempt will be good experience, and inexpensive.
 

Rob Allen

Active Member
I have repaired several broken rods. This one looks like you'll need to trim each end to get clean, un-splintered ends. See if you can scrounge a broken fiberglass rod section, for the splice sleeve, from a local rod shop. (It's important to use fiberglass, as it's more flexible than graphite, and will impede the rods' action less.) You'll want the sleeve on the outside of the blank, with 3" of overlap on each end (6" o/all length) Sand a bevel on each end of the splice section to make the transition less abrupt. Depending on how much you have to trim off the blank ends, the lower section may be loose inside the sleeve. You can take up the slack by spiraling a strand of thread up this section before epoxying. I would use Rod-bond epoxy, as it's more flexible (and less brittle) than regular epoxy. Once the splice epoxy has set, I would wrap thread up and onto the join, then coat with Flexcoat or Threadmaster. The splice will either work, or it won't...but the attempt will be good experience, and inexpensive.

I concur with the 6" overall length..

As SalmoG said. Youre essentially creating a ferrule.
It is vital that the wrap on the outside be a transverse fiber to create the needed hoop strength for a durable repair.

Also important is sanding the parts. Then cleaning them, acetone works best, clean the inside of the blank too. This will give the best adhesion for the epoxy..

Never tried the kevlar thread seems like it might work but i think I'd stick with fiberglass twine if you can find it.
 

Bake

Member
Check out MSC Industrial Supply, I've found that they carry a lot of misc. prefab fiberglass parts and components. Look under the heading "Plastic Rods". A little luck, sandpaper, and 5-minute epoxy. You will "Be Good to Go"!

MSC IND.SUPPLY

The 1/4" dia. fiberglass rod is what I used to add a Spey rod type lower handle to one of my single hand rods...
 
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wetswinger

Active Member
My son in law had an old rod he gave me, I gave him a 6er for thanks. Found some flexible made for vibration, epoxy at McClendons. Made a double thick dowel, like suggested and over the length of the day got it all put together. Letting it set tonight. Tomorrow I’ll thread wrap it and give it the first coat of polyethylene. I’m not buy epoxy clear coat for one wrap, so it’s poly. Thank you all so much for the guidance. I’ll go lawn cast it in a few days and report back. Thanks again...
 

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