Garden Thread 2020

Smalma

Active Member
Bought most of garden needs a month ago, one raised bed (of 5) weeded and the main garden has been tilled and ready for planting. The onion sets and potatoes are in the ground and hope to plant the peas tomorrow.

curt
 

Gary Knowels

Active Member
Bought most of garden needs a month ago, one raised bed (of 5) weeded and the main garden has been tilled and ready for planting. The onion sets and potatoes are in the ground and hope to plant the peas tomorrow.

curt
People keep telling me it's too early to plant. Can I sow peas and carrots and cruciferous seeds now or do I need to start them indoors first? I'm in central Tacoma
 

wetswinger

Active Member
People keep telling me it's too early to plant. Can I sow peas and carrots and cruciferous seeds now or do I need to start them indoors first? I'm in central Tacoma
Peas two weeks ago. Carrot, 60 degree soil. A couple weeks yet. Onions from seed or sets now. Radish and turnips today along with greens. Lettuce and beets three weeks yet. Don’t plant potatoes until May or they’ll stunt. Cabbage, et al, now.
 

wetswinger

Active Member
Peas two plus weeks ago. Carrot, 60 degree soil. A few weeks yet. Onions from seed or sets now. Radish and turnips today along with greens. Lettuce and beets three weeks yet. Don’t plant potatoes until May or they’ll stunt. Cabbage, et al, soon. This is assuming you get at least 6 hrs. of Sun on your plot.
 

Smalma

Active Member
Gary -
Wetswinger has nailed the timing for planting many of our crops. I will be planting my corn in early May and beans a couple week later. The best time to plant may of our crops is driven by the type of plant, the soils and how it drains, soil temperature and night time temperatures. I'm located in the Marysville area. I have noticed that I' planting things a couple earlier than 50 years ago. Every year I try to tinker with a couple variables for something - planting time, crop variety, etc.

I know that there a number of excellent gardeners on this site that can/will provide more insights assuring that we have our best home gardens.
Curt
 

wetswinger

Active Member
If you want to learn about gardening locally, get the book Growing Vegetables West of the Cascades 6th edition, by Steve Solomon. It made an immediate difference in my success. It’s available in PDF or can be found at used book websites for as little as 5 bucks. He was the founder of Territorial Seed Co. Can’t recommend it highly enough...The planning and planting section is my savior..
 

tallguy

Active Member
With my kid home from school, I have been planting and weeding as an activity to keep him busy. Planted peas, lettuce, beets carrots, spinach, (wish I had read the wetswinger advice a little earlier), and onions so far. Garlic and some onions and overwintered greens etc from last year perking up a bit.

My advice: it's easy to buy too many onion sets, those little clumps hold alot and planting them all will take up way too much space. 1.5 clumps is too much, i learned this lesson yesterday.
 

kmudgn

Active Member
Where I live in NH I am edge of Zone 5 into 4. Way too early for outside plants. Pic shows seedlings growing on hot table. Left to right-Impatiens/Peppers/Broccoli&Dill/Lettuce/Spinach/Leeks &Shallots
Tomatoes/herbs and other hot season plants will be started in about a week. Planting date here for sensitive is Memorial Day. Hopefully, in about 2 weeks I can direct plant pea & radish seeds, put spinach in cold frame and lettuce plants in ground. Additional flats of lettuce planted next week as well

starting.jpg
 

wadin' boot

Donny, you're out of your element...
WFF Supporter
Had a 9 inch wide birch log I decided to turn into birdhouse(s), cut the log in three places, two end caps, one core. Hollowed out the core with a bunch of perimeter 3/8 inch drill holes and some chisel work. if you do this, don't drill straight, angle them a little, then flip the core over, drill another perimeter ring on the same angle, that way you will cross the drill paths. Helps minimize the chisel work. The cap hole is a 1-inch one, carefully done with a spade bit. Probably should have done that first, before cutting the cap, but lucked out and the hole didn't ruin the coin/cap

This himalaya birch was laid low with boring beetle, summer 2014. The wood had some black staining in it which I am presuming was from the bore beetle. It was sorta soft and spongy, which I wasn't expecting, clearly the beetle had screwed up the wood's integrity. Anyway, made a cylinder of wood, glued the caps all together with a liberal amount of clear silicone, clamped it, and hung it when dry. 90 minutes later a black capped chickadee was checking it out. Decided to make another one today, this time it took about 15 minutes before the birds were checking it out. I want to get my garden/yard wildlife certified...

This btw would be a fun project with a kid...from learning over time, the chickadees like the hole a little high up, they don't need a perch to grab onto at the house entry and the entry cap should be like 3/8 of a inch wide or so...they take it from there, peck away inside to make it good. Put a few 1/8 inch drill holes along the body of the cylinder, angled towards the roof, for a little air venting...

1585528159230.png
I chiseled the hole so the rim was about 3/8 around, the pic below was not as wide as it would ultimately become. A second house I was more generous in drilling closer to the perimeter to save time
1585528192567.png
There's my new friend checking out the hood!
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Also had this piece of shit CD rack lying around, decided to make a mason bee hive out of my garden refuse of bamboo and hollow tubes. Who knows if it will work, but was fun to do.

1585528230193.png
 
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Shawn Seeger

(aka. wabowhunter)
WFF Supporter
Well I turned the top over last fall, got a small section composted, the wife started putting chips down while I was fishing. I plan on putting in a serious post and hog wire fence (we have deer and elk!).

Gonna do tomato, beans, broccoli (again in wine barrels). Got blueberries in adding more, and started wild evergreen huckleberries. Once the fencing is up we will add a bunch of stuff.

My nightly serenade is getting louder, the soil is still pretty wet in the field.

View attachment VID_20200329_194402971.mp4
 

Salmo_g

Well-Known Member
WFF Supporter
I turned the soil in one of my raised beds. It's still pretty wet, but I planted some lettuce and radishes anyway.
 

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