SFR - Bird Dumper

SHD

Active Member
Went to the park after work today and found this pile of feathers in the brush off a rarely used trail.
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The same feathers were strewn around a good 20 foot area or so. Most likely a coyote kill as this park has a handful.
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Silver Pheasant. Never used these before, I need a pattern recommendation.
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My friend sent these pics to a local park regular who monitors the wildlife there. She sent back a pic she took last week of a golden on the trail.
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Why would anyone dump such cool birds off in the park? I mean they have to be worth some money I would think. Illegal breeder?
 

Jim Darden

Active Member
Wow...that's incredible, when I saw your silver pheasant feathers I thought you were pulling my leg but the golden pheasant shot really hooked me....unless you are really good at doctoring pictures. I'd take my bird dog and a shotgun next time you go to the park!!........;)
 

Gary Thompson

dirty dog
Somebody could not take care of their birds any more, could not find a buyer so released in the park.
The birds are not wild enough to survive for long.
China pheasants released at game sites do last long, coyote and hawks eatem' right up'.
 

Gyrfalcon2015

Wild Trout
Somebody could not take care of their birds any more, could not find a buyer so released in the park.
The birds are not wild enough to survive for long.
China pheasants released at game sites do last long, coyote and hawks eatem' right up'.
Actually, I am 1 mile from a pheasant release site and on our coastal farm, we get multiple survivors yearly. Infact, the past week or so I have seen and heard a few males calling and wing thumping. We almost always get a brood or two from breeding pairs that make it. The pheasants go from really dumb when they are first planted (what sport is shooting a tame bird, I say?) to where they actually get smart and act like a wild bird.
The predators do get a majority for sure-I've witnessed chases and found piles of feathers, but I always enjoy seeing ones that have a made a real life for the rest of their time as opposed to previously being a pen raised unit : )
 
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Gary Thompson

dirty dog
Actually, I am 1 mile from a pheasant release site and on our coastal farm, we get multiple survivors yearly. Infact, the past week or so I have seen and heard a few males calling and wing thumping. We almost always get a brood or two from breeding pairs that make it. The pheasants go from really dumb when they are first planted (what sport is shooting a tame bird, I say?) to where they actually get smart and act like a wild bird.
The predators do get a majority for sure-I've witnessed chases and found piles of feathers, but I always enjoy seeing ones that have a made a real life for the rest of their time as opposed to previously being a pen raised unit : )
My experience is with the East side sites.
I killed a rooster at the end of the season one year that was starving to death,
Another experience was. My good friend, myself and our sons went one morning after the release the evening before.
We got our limits and never fired a shot, our Goldens were catching the birds before they would fly.
It was the craziest bird hunt I had been on.
 

longputt

Active Member
Somehow some survived years ago to create the population of wild birds we have, so some must survive. I went to planted pheasant area with my son for youth hunt and we found 20 birds with their heads removed. I wondered if it was an owl that did that? I can't imagine what else would do that.
 

Gyrfalcon2015

Wild Trout
Somehow some survived years ago to create the population of wild birds we have, so some must survive. I went to planted pheasant area with my son for youth hunt and we found 20 birds with their heads removed. I wondered if it was an owl that did that? I can't imagine what else would do that.
A lot do starve, so many times we find animals after a scavenger has worked on them, and not killed.

Bald Eagles do that a lot. Lazy birds, they'd as soon pick off an easy meal, dead critters move slow.
 

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