temporary way to hold guides and cast

Tobe Hagge

Active Member
I'm building an 11' 7 weight switch rod, my first two handed rod. I've got the parts, a reel and line, a statewide stay-in-place order that might last a while, a river within walking distance, and a hankering to practice some spey casting. What I don't have is thread epoxy; my order (from Angler's Workshop) seems to have run afoul of Illinois' stay-in-place order. There are other places to buy it, but I'm disinclined to make more work for the local delivery people at this particular time.

I often read that it's not the epoxy that holds the guides on, but the threads. If I wrap the guides, is there a way to hold the wraps in place that's good enough for a few sessions of spey casting practice and can be undone eventually once my order arrives? I don't mind rewrapping. Is there a way to tie the wraps so that they don't tend to slide along the rod and come loose? I've seen how thread epoxy is removed but have not done it myself; I'm hesitant to try this process to remove guides attached with other adhesive. Can I just gorilla tape the wraps on, or something? More generally, this is something I'd like to be able to do in the future to play with guide spacings and test how they affect the way the rod casts, without having to add and remove thread epoxy or leave permanent marks on the rod in places that won't ultimately have guides.
 

rawalker

Active Member
What Lue said. Tape is great so you can adjust the guides right there and make sure you like the spacing.
I've used Sally Hansen's hard as nails for temporary repairs that somehow never got redone permanently and a few years later are still holding up well.
 

Tobe Hagge

Active Member
Thanks all. I'm going to try nail polish, and take some mineral spirits/rubbing alcohol to it later. I'll also try a few dry test casts with the tape before I wrap but I'm not convinced I won't figure out a way to toss one of my guides into the river.
 

Scudley Do Right

Active Member
I use surgical tubing to make small rubber bands, just roll them down from the tip. I know people who used the small rubber bands that they used to put braces on with but I don't even know if those are still a thing.
 

Mike Monsos

AKA flyman219
WFF Supporter
I use Teflon plumbers tape to hold my guides in place. If you take a strip about four inches long and split it lengthwise you have two 1/4" wide pieces. Wrap your guide and pull it tight as you wrap. It will not leave any residue and hold well. If you are using single foot guides you might use a bit longer piece and put a wrap or three behind the guide foot.
Mike
 

Chucker

Chucking a dead parrot on a piece of string!
I use Teflon plumbers tape to hold my guides in place. If you take a strip about four inches long and split it lengthwise you have two 1/4" wide pieces. Wrap your guide and pull it tight as you wrap. It will not leave any residue and hold well. If you are using single foot guides you might use a bit longer piece and put a wrap or three behind the guide foot.
Mike
That’s a new one for me. I will have to try it the next time I am working on a rod.
 

Rob Allen

Active Member
I have cast and even fished with hundreds of rods that just had the guides masking taped in place.

One thing I'd say however is make sure the guide feet have no burrs as they can damage the blank's finish and given enough time and movement can even cut into the graphite.

Just something to be careful of.
 

2kayaker

Active Member
That’s a new one for me. I will have to try it the next time I am working on a rod.
Try the smallest zip ties from the auto parts store. They are about 3" long and leave enough guide foot exposed that I use them to wrap the first half of each foot, then snip them off .
 

Tom Bowden

Active Member
Here's a blank I just finished, set up for lawn test casting before I go to the trouble and expense of finishing it. The guides are the wrong size and taped on, the grip is a wash cloth, and the reel seat is an up-lock which I inverted and jammed on the butt section over tape to hold a reel. As you can see, cosmetics aren't important at this stage.

The rod is a hollow-built 9' bonefish / salmon rod that I converted to 4-piece with slip-over fiberglass ferrules, so that it will fit in a travel case. It cast a WF7 and Rio Outbound Short 6-weight with authority. I tried it with an 8-weight tropical line and it cast short range OK, but wimped out on long casts into the wind. I'll call it a 7-weight, which was actually the intent. I decided to refinish it. I have some concerns about the ferrules holding up, but this is a "rod maker's rod" that is intended for testing, fishing, and keeping me occupied during the pandemic.

Bonefish Rod.jpg
 

Support WFF | Remove the Ads

Support WFF by upgrading your account. Site supporters benefits include no ads and access to some additional features, few now, more in the works. Info

Latest posts

Top